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June Mccarroll

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2003 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Frontier doctor June McCarroll's legacy protects drivers even today, more than 80 years after her inspiration that center lines would improve highway safety. It took years for her idea to be accepted but she refused to quit, campaigning relentlessly with words and even a paintbrush. A five-mile stretch of Interstate 10 in Indio was named for her last year. The Riverside County physician from the early 20th century joins hundreds of notables honored along the car culture's arteries.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2003 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Frontier doctor June McCarroll's legacy protects drivers even today, more than 80 years after her inspiration that center lines would improve highway safety. It took years for her idea to be accepted but she refused to quit, campaigning relentlessly with words and even a paintbrush. A five-mile stretch of Interstate 10 in Indio was named for her last year. The Riverside County physician from the early 20th century joins hundreds of notables honored along the car culture's arteries.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2006
April 24, 2002: A five-mile section of Interstate 10 in Indio was dedicated to honor June McCarroll, a pioneering doctor who successfully campaigned to have center lines painted on roadways to improve safety. The Riverside County physician, who was known as Dr. June, was driving home one day in 1917 when a truck forced her car off the road.
MAGAZINE
July 8, 2001 | LISA LEFF
Given our status-conscious, auto-fixated image, you'd think Southern Californians would be lined up bumper to bumper to get their names on a freeway segment, bridge or overpass. But until recent years, traffic in memorial roadways has been, well, light. With 4,699 highway miles ripe for the picking south of the Santa Barbara County line, a mere 48 individuals have garnered this, er, moving tribute since 1895. Here, as on so many of life's byways, politicians seem to be hogging the road.
NEWS
July 10, 2002 | MARY McNAMARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even for those who believe in an afterlife, it is difficult to imagine the circumstances under which Christopher Columbus, Rosa Parks and Sonny Bono would find themselves hanging around together. After discussing the obvious--thank God Cher's on tour again--what on Earth would they talk about? Well, perhaps their mutual ownership of Interstate 10.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2006 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
The ladies did the heavy lifting 100 years ago. So it was fitting that their descendants in the California Federation of Women's Clubs and the Native Daughters of the Golden West on Tuesday helped ring in the El Camino Real bell's second century. Members of the two groups helped state officials unveil a replica of the 85-pound cast-iron bell that pioneering women's organizations erected Aug. 15, 1906, in downtown Los Angeles as the state's first road marker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2003 | Lisa Leff, Special to The Times
Who in the world is Edmund J. Russ? And why was an interchange on the Artesia Freeway named after him? How about Robert E. McClure? What noble deeds earned him the distinction of being identified with the tunnel that shoots motorists from the gloom of the Santa Monica Freeway to the glory of Pacific Coast Highway?
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