Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJune O Neill
IN THE NEWS

June O Neill

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 11, 1995 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the titanic battle over the federal budget, a brawl in which words and numbers careen through the air like heat-seeking weapons, there might seem little room for a soft-spoken, onetime piano student from the Bronx named June O'Neill. Yet in a twist of fate, the scholarly, bespectacled O'Neill occupies a pivotal role in the stormy political contest: She is the referee, the scorekeeper, the guardian of the clock.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 11, 1995 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the titanic battle over the federal budget, a brawl in which words and numbers careen through the air like heat-seeking weapons, there might seem little room for a soft-spoken, onetime piano student from the Bronx named June O'Neill. Yet in a twist of fate, the scholarly, bespectacled O'Neill occupies a pivotal role in the stormy political contest: She is the referee, the scorekeeper, the guardian of the clock.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 11, 1995 | Associated Press
Congressional Republicans named New York economist June O'Neill on Friday to be director of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. O'Neill, 60, is director of the Center for the Study of Business and Government at Bernard Baruch College in New York, where she is also an economics professor. A registered Republican, she is also adjunct scholar at the conservative American Enterprise Institute in Washington.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | DREX HEIKES and JAMES RISEN
TOP PENCIL: Republican congressional leaders have selected June O'Neill, a conservative labor economist at Baruch College in New York, as director of the Congressional Budget Office, sources say. She will succeed Robert D. Reischauer, who angered Republicans by dismissing their supply-side economic theories. O'Neill's selection could be announced by the end of the week, ending a search in which several high-profile conservative economists spurned the job.
SPORTS
June 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Ken Griffey Jr. hit his 30th homer of the season Friday night, Edgar Martinez added a three-run shot and Dave Fleming ended a personal five-game losing streak as the Seattle Mariners defeated the Kansas City Royals, 5-1, at Kansas City. Griffey's homer enabled him to match Babe Ruth's mark for most home runs before June 30. Ruth hit 30 by that date in both 1928 and 1930, finishing with 54 in 1928 and 49 two years later.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | HELAINE OLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Are "comparable worth" programs working? The programs, established during the 1980s, were intended to overcome practices in which employers often paid women and members of minority groups less than they paid men for virtually the same sort of jobs. But progress so far has been slow. Census Bureau figures show that in 1989 full-time female workers made 68.6 cents for every $1 that full-time male employees earned, up from about 59.
NEWS
February 18, 1992 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
Frankly, I think they should have thrown the entire library at Rori O'Neill. The cities are crumbling, the gangs are driving law-abiding citizens off the streets and now this: Someone who thinks she can just help herself to property belonging to the city of Long Beach. Not so fast, Ms. O'Neill. And would it be too much for the citizens of Long Beach to expect a little repentance? After all, you might think that someone caught red-handed-- in fido delicto, as it were--would 'fess up.
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Congressional Budget Office declared Monday that President Clinton's budget, if enacted, would fail to achieve the stated White House goal of balancing the budget in five years and instead would leave a deficit of $69 billion in 2002. The report prompted some Republicans in Congress to demand that the White House submit a new budget that would make good on its promise to eliminate the deficit.
NEWS
September 3, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Republican congressional leaders poised to begin the toughest part of this year's budget battle, some of the world's leading economists and economic policy-makers have some bad news: The GOP's plan to balance the budget over the next seven years will barely make a dent in America's long-term budget problems.
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The White House disclosed plans Tuesday to offer Republicans a new budget proposal later this week, in one of several signs that the negotiations may break free of their recent impasse. Officials said that the White House and congressional Democrats have been jointly crafting a plan that would cut discretionary spending more than President Clinton's earlier spending blueprint to balance the budget in seven years.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Remember the annual budget deficit--the fiscal scourge that politicians have warned would bankrupt our children, the flash point for endless partisan squabbling, the all-purpose symbol of a nation living beyond its means? It's getting smaller. To the surprise of many budget watchers, the government's red ink is now projected to total $144 billion next year. That's a tidy sum to be sure, but--relative to the size of the economy--it is the smallest gap since the 1970s.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|