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June Osborn

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NEWS
September 18, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
In the fall of 1985, when there were about 14,000 diagnosed cases of AIDS in the nation and most Americans were just beginning to grasp the implications of the growing and deadly scourge, a woman little known outside the public health community delivered a speech that moved many in her audience to the brink of tears. "We're in serious trouble," she said. "We have a world-class epidemic on our hands." She went on to talk about the individuals afflicted with AIDS.
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NEWS
September 18, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
In the fall of 1985, when there were about 14,000 diagnosed cases of AIDS in the nation and most Americans were just beginning to grasp the implications of the growing and deadly scourge, a woman little known outside the public health community delivered a speech that moved many in her audience to the brink of tears. "We're in serious trouble," she said. "We have a world-class epidemic on our hands." She went on to talk about the individuals afflicted with AIDS.
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NEWS
September 20, 1989
The national AIDS commission, concerned that President Bush's anti-drug strategy makes too little mention of AIDS, agreed to draft a statement calling for treatment of drug addicts in preventing the spread of AIDS. The statement will reaffirm a call by the previous AIDS commission formed by President Ronald Reagan for drug treatment on demand as a national goal, said Dr. June Osborn, chairwoman of the new panel. The AIDS virus can be spread through sharing of needles by drug users.
NEWS
September 10, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Belinda Mason, a mother who used her position on a presidential commission to dramatize the plight of AIDS victims far different from herself, died Monday of AIDS-related pneumonia. Mrs. Mason, the only AIDS-infected member of the National Commission on AIDS and an outspoken critic of President Bush's AIDS research policy, was 33. Mrs. Mason, who contracted the disease through a blood transfusion, died at Vanderbilt University Medical Center here, said hospital spokesman Doug Williams.
NEWS
August 21, 1990 | From United Press International
Many parts of rural America soon may be "blind-sided" by the deadly AIDS epidemic, the National AIDS Commission warned today. In its third report, the commission, formed by Congress to oversee the nation's fight against AIDS, said the number of new AIDS cases diagnosed in rural communities is growing at an "alarming rate."
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | from Associated Press
Government spending on AIDS research is almost adequate, but the Bush Administration has devoted far too little effort to AIDS prevention and care for AIDS victims, the chairwoman of the National AIDS Commission said. "People are literally dying in the streets," said Dr. June Osborn, chairwoman of the panel that was appointed to be the government's conscience for the epidemic that already has claimed more than 152,000 American lives. "This is going to get very, very big," Osborn said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1989
The new National AIDS Commission has made a propitious start on its work, demonstrating both the wisdom of Congress in creating the commission and the strength of its members, appointed by Congress and President Bush. At its initial meeting, the commission moved quickly into the critical problem of drug abuse, expressing its disappointment at the failure of President Bush to address the AIDS problem in conjunction with his massive anti-drug campaign. That stand was important in several ways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1989
President Bush's failure to name the last two members of the National Commission on AIDS is delaying activation of the commission, and that, in turn, is handicapping national efforts to spur programs to control the spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS. The White House has explained the delay as inevitable, given the heavy burden of new appointments required of a new administration, but it may also reflect a struggle by persons on the radical right to impose their choice on the President.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Equipment used during routine visits to the dentist can harbor and possibly transmit the AIDS virus if rigorous sterilization procedures are not followed, according to a study released Friday by researchers at the University of Georgia.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Up to 110 million of the world's adults likely will be infected with the AIDS virus by the turn of the century, a prediction nearly three times that of a recent projection by the World Health Organization, according to a new study released Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1989
With two excellent if belated appointments by President Bush, the new national AIDS Commission is complete and ready to get to work. There is optimism that it will be an effective new force in facing the growing problem just at the moment when the total of AIDS cases in the United States has reached 100,000. The optimism has two sources. First of all, Bush has shown a concern and a commitment that former President Ronald Reagan failed to provide.
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