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June Watanabe

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October 6, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
San Francisco-area modern dancer June Watanabe impressed with amplitude, ease and integrity of movement in a solo recital Friday at El Camino College. She developed witty, mysterious connections between the fixed points provided by Remy Charlip's whimsical drawings of dancing figures in "Red Towel Dance" (to pianist Robert Haag's prosaic account of parts of Bach's "Goldberg Variations").
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1996 | Judy Coburn, Judy Coburn is a Bay Area freelance writer
"Noh is about what is unseen," says dancer and choreographer June Watanabe, whose "Noh Project" plays at the Japan America Theatre this week. What will actually transpire onstage is Watanabe's audacious mingling of the austere 600-year-old Japanese ritual of Noh, her own contemporary choreography and electroacoustic music by California composer Carl Stone. Produced jointly by L.A.'
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1996 | Judy Coburn, Judy Coburn is a Bay Area freelance writer
"Noh is about what is unseen," says dancer and choreographer June Watanabe, whose "Noh Project" plays at the Japan America Theatre this week. What will actually transpire onstage is Watanabe's audacious mingling of the austere 600-year-old Japanese ritual of Noh, her own contemporary choreography and electroacoustic music by California composer Carl Stone. Produced jointly by L.A.'
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
San Francisco-area modern dancer June Watanabe impressed with amplitude, ease and integrity of movement in a solo recital Friday at El Camino College. She developed witty, mysterious connections between the fixed points provided by Remy Charlip's whimsical drawings of dancing figures in "Red Towel Dance" (to pianist Robert Haag's prosaic account of parts of Bach's "Goldberg Variations").
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1996 | KELLY DAVID
In honor of the college's new dance major, Moorpark College will host a dance performance tonight featuring artists who helped create the program over the past 15 years. The dancers will include John Pennington of the Bella Lewitzky Company performing Scott Heinzerling's "Isaac Wanted"; L.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1985 | CHRIS PASLES
The first subscription dance series in the Japan America Theatre resumed Saturday with modern dance by two Asian-American choreographers: San Francisco-based June Watanabe and Heidi Ashley of Los Angeles. Set to a tape collage combining Joan LaBarbara's chirpy vocalizing with hyped-up Bach, Watanabe's "Bird Run" traversed birdlike movement patterns fluidly, comically--and tiringly. "E.O.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was far more than a trip down memory lane when 32 dancers spoke about their lives in "The Horse's Mouth Greets the New Millennium" Saturday at the Japan America Theatre. Sure, every 90-second anecdote in this "live documentary" created by Tina Croll and James Cunningham revealed an interesting part of the dancers' lives, sometimes hilariously, sometimes touchingly. We got to know, appreciate and embrace them more and in a different way than when they danced later.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1996
BANG IN CONCERT "Just Can't Stop It," by the English Beat, was one of the great albums of the '80s. Dave Wakeling, former frontman of the band, is back with a new band, Bang, doing new stuff, but also all those great Beat songs such as "Tears of a Clown," "Ranking Full Stop" and "Two Swords." Bang will be tearing up Nicholby's in Ventura with its brand of rockin' ska.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Keith Clark and his eight-year old Pacific Symphony face the trauma of moving to a new home this week. But the trauma can be borne, because the new home is the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. Thursday night, Clark & Co. launch their ninth season--Clark founded the ensemble at Cal State Fullerton in 1978--with a program of three showcase works: Brahms' Violin Concerto (with Henryk Szeryng as soloist), Respighi's "Pines of Rome" and Richard Strauss' "Don Juan."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2004 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
Her garden has wilted. The flowers Ruby Sharum tended so zealously outside her manila-colored stucco house in Orange have withered away. And she will never again know the prick of a thorn or feel dirt through her fingers. A month ago, Sharum, 91, was attacked by her great-grandson's pit bull while she put away groceries. She not only lost both arms, but also much of the independence that her friends and family say she has shown her entire life. Sharum now lies in a hospital bed at St.
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