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June Wayne

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By David Pagel
June Wayne (1918-2011) is best known for starting and running the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, a world-renowned institution that has been going strong for 53 years. She is also known as an innovative printmaker, her own lithographs outstanding examples of what the medium can deliver. As a painter, Wayne is not so well known. At Louis Stern Fine Arts, an introductory survey goes a long way to change that. “June Wayne: Eloquent Visionary” displays paintings alongside prints to reveal that Wayne moved freely between the media, gleaning insights from each and enhancing our understanding of both.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By David Pagel
June Wayne (1918-2011) is best known for starting and running the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, a world-renowned institution that has been going strong for 53 years. She is also known as an innovative printmaker, her own lithographs outstanding examples of what the medium can deliver. As a painter, Wayne is not so well known. At Louis Stern Fine Arts, an introductory survey goes a long way to change that. “June Wayne: Eloquent Visionary” displays paintings alongside prints to reveal that Wayne moved freely between the media, gleaning insights from each and enhancing our understanding of both.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Pure light and space became a serious aesthetic vehicle in '60s Southern California. Such phenomenon-based art flowered here in the work of chaps like Larry Bell and Robert Irwin, but they had artistic ancestors. Painter John McLaughlin is frequently noted. Another less obvious precursor is June Wayne. At 80, she's something of a phenomenon herself. Her work is reviewed at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in "June Wayne: A Retrospective." About time, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2012 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At the Norton Simon Museum, an exhibition examining the L.A. area's postwar printmaking boom begins with a different sort of graphic. It's not a Richard Diebenkorn lithograph, an Ed Ruscha screenprint or any of the 150 or so other works in "Proof: The Rise of Printmaking in Southern California. " Gracing the title wall is a six-foot-wide bubble diagram - what "Proof" curator Leah Lehmbeck calls "a map of all the complexities, crossovers, key institutions and people covered in the show," which runs at the Pasadena museum through April 2. PHOTOS: Richard Diebenkorn The exhibition delves into an important chapter in American art history: the L.A.-based renaissance in the '60s and '70s, during which printmaking was embraced as a contemporary art form.
OPINION
July 1, 1990 | Christopher Knight, Christopher Knight is an art critic for The Times. He interviewed the artist in her Hollywood studio
Earlier this year, June Wayne walked to the podium at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and delivered the keynote address to the annual meeting of the College Art Assn. The assembly of artists, art historians and museum administrators repeatedly interrupted her speech with bursts of applause, culminating in a standing ovation. Her topic: politics and the right of artistic free expression, at a moment when the future of the National Endowment for the Arts is in doubt.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"I think I run on indignation," June Wayne says. Well, that's a relief. The artist known for reviving lithography, pushing aesthetic boundaries in a large body of prints, paintings and tapestries -- and speaking her mind on politics, feminism and art world issues -- has not mellowed with age. And age is a sore point. Wayne doesn't deny that she will turn 90 on Friday. But she's so full of energy and ideas that getting old is "a terrible handicap," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1998 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Working on a new lithograph a few years ago, June Wayne recalled a production illustration she'd made in 1943 detailing the internal structure of an airplane. She recycled the drawing, making it the central image of her 1996 print "Nacelle." "It amuses me to take ideas that were more than 50 years apart and combine them," says Wayne. "I find there's a continuity in my work, and its parts all live very happily with one another." All those parts go on view Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1991
"The arts are the rain forests of society. They produce the oxygen of freedom and they are the early warning system when freedom is in danger."--Multimedia artist June Wayne
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1987 | CATHY CURTIS
Los Angeles printer Lynton Kistler was influential in introducing color offset lithography to the fine art world and worked with numerous prominent artists based in Southern California. June Wayne studied with him before she formed the Tamarind Lithography workshop in 1960. But most of the 57 artists represented in an exhibit of 88 lithographs pulled under Kistler's supervision are long forgotten. Their work in this medium suggests, alas, that their oblivion is not undeserved.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Broadcasting its new position as a socially and politically concerned organization, the College Art Assn. capped its 1990 conference with a provocative speech by Los Angeles artist June Wayne and granted all but one of its annual awards to women and minorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2011 | By Mary Rourke, Special to the Los Angeles Times
June Wayne, who helped pioneer a revival of fine-art print making in the 1960s when she founded the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles, has died. She was 93. An accomplished artist in her own right, Wayne died Tuesday at her home in Los Angeles after a long illness, according to her assistant, Larry Workman. Wayne gained an international reputation starting in 1960 when she began to invite leading artists to collaborate with professional printers at Tamarind and create artist's prints.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"I think I run on indignation," June Wayne says. Well, that's a relief. The artist known for reviving lithography, pushing aesthetic boundaries in a large body of prints, paintings and tapestries -- and speaking her mind on politics, feminism and art world issues -- has not mellowed with age. And age is a sore point. Wayne doesn't deny that she will turn 90 on Friday. But she's so full of energy and ideas that getting old is "a terrible handicap," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Pure light and space became a serious aesthetic vehicle in '60s Southern California. Such phenomenon-based art flowered here in the work of chaps like Larry Bell and Robert Irwin, but they had artistic ancestors. Painter John McLaughlin is frequently noted. Another less obvious precursor is June Wayne. At 80, she's something of a phenomenon herself. Her work is reviewed at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in "June Wayne: A Retrospective." About time, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1998 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Working on a new lithograph a few years ago, June Wayne recalled a production illustration she'd made in 1943 detailing the internal structure of an airplane. She recycled the drawing, making it the central image of her 1996 print "Nacelle." "It amuses me to take ideas that were more than 50 years apart and combine them," says Wayne. "I find there's a continuity in my work, and its parts all live very happily with one another." All those parts go on view Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1991
"The arts are the rain forests of society. They produce the oxygen of freedom and they are the early warning system when freedom is in danger."--Multimedia artist June Wayne
OPINION
July 1, 1990 | Christopher Knight, Christopher Knight is an art critic for The Times. He interviewed the artist in her Hollywood studio
Earlier this year, June Wayne walked to the podium at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and delivered the keynote address to the annual meeting of the College Art Assn. The assembly of artists, art historians and museum administrators repeatedly interrupted her speech with bursts of applause, culminating in a standing ovation. Her topic: politics and the right of artistic free expression, at a moment when the future of the National Endowment for the Arts is in doubt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2011 | By Mary Rourke, Special to the Los Angeles Times
June Wayne, who helped pioneer a revival of fine-art print making in the 1960s when she founded the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles, has died. She was 93. An accomplished artist in her own right, Wayne died Tuesday at her home in Los Angeles after a long illness, according to her assistant, Larry Workman. Wayne gained an international reputation starting in 1960 when she began to invite leading artists to collaborate with professional printers at Tamarind and create artist's prints.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2012 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At the Norton Simon Museum, an exhibition examining the L.A. area's postwar printmaking boom begins with a different sort of graphic. It's not a Richard Diebenkorn lithograph, an Ed Ruscha screenprint or any of the 150 or so other works in "Proof: The Rise of Printmaking in Southern California. " Gracing the title wall is a six-foot-wide bubble diagram - what "Proof" curator Leah Lehmbeck calls "a map of all the complexities, crossovers, key institutions and people covered in the show," which runs at the Pasadena museum through April 2. PHOTOS: Richard Diebenkorn The exhibition delves into an important chapter in American art history: the L.A.-based renaissance in the '60s and '70s, during which printmaking was embraced as a contemporary art form.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1990 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Broadcasting its new position as a socially and politically concerned organization, the College Art Assn. capped its 1990 conference with a provocative speech by Los Angeles artist June Wayne and granted all but one of its annual awards to women and minorities.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1987 | CATHY CURTIS
Los Angeles printer Lynton Kistler was influential in introducing color offset lithography to the fine art world and worked with numerous prominent artists based in Southern California. June Wayne studied with him before she formed the Tamarind Lithography workshop in 1960. But most of the 57 artists represented in an exhibit of 88 lithographs pulled under Kistler's supervision are long forgotten. Their work in this medium suggests, alas, that their oblivion is not undeserved.
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