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NEWS
August 18, 1994 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nestled at the foot of majestic mountains along Alaska's famed inland waterway, Juneau was a great place to build a fishing community and tourist center. But as most Alaskans will tell you, it was a lousy place to build the capital. Nonetheless, this is where the seat of government is, much to the consternation of many of the state's half-million residents.
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NEWS
August 18, 1994 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nestled at the foot of majestic mountains along Alaska's famed inland waterway, Juneau was a great place to build a fishing community and tourist center. But as most Alaskans will tell you, it was a lousy place to build the capital. Nonetheless, this is where the seat of government is, much to the consternation of many of the state's half-million residents.
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TRAVEL
March 12, 1995 | LEE DYE, Dye, a free-lance writer and former science writer for The Times, lives in Juneau
The front-page story told of a local hunter who'd shot and killed two charging brown bears in less than a minute--only to have his legs crushed when the second 1,000-pound beast fell on him. I had just arrived in Juneau, a Coast Guard officer starting a yearlong assignment in the Last Frontier. Glancing up from my newspaper at the drizzling skies and bleak little clapboard houses in bare, muddy yards, I couldn't help but wonder: "Why was I here? Why was anybody here?"
TRAVEL
May 19, 1996
When planning your trip and requesting travel literature, be as specific as possible. ALABAMA: Alabama Bureau of Tourism and Travel, 401 Adams Ave., Suite 126, Montgomery, AL 36104; (800) 252-2262 or (334) 242-4169.6 ALASKA: Alaska Division of Tourism, P.O. Box 110801, Juneau, AK 99811-0801; 907-465-2010. ARIZONA: Arizona Office of Tourism, 2702 N. 3rd St. Suite 4015, Phoenix, AZ 85004; (602) 230-7733. ARKANSAS: Arkansas Tourism Office, One Capitol Mall, Dept.
TRAVEL
July 19, 1998 | LORNA H. PFLUKE, Pfluke is a freelance writer who lives in Placentia
Somewhere outside the train window, Mt. McKinley stood tall on the horizon, North America's highest mountain and the second-biggest tourist attraction in Alaska. It's what we were hoping to see on this two-day rail tour, and we were sorely disappointed by cloud cover far below the 20,320-foot summit. Imagine our disappointment if we'd made this 233-mile trip as most people do--by car on a highway where the speed limit is whatever the bumper-to-bumper RV traffic will allow.
TRAVEL
March 29, 1998
Most states and U.S. territories have tourism offices to provide assistance to visitors. If requesting travel literature, be as specific as possible. ALABAMA: Alabama Bureau of Tourism and Travel, 401 Adams Ave., Suite 126, Montgomery, AL 36104; telephone (800) 252-2262 or (334) 242-4169, fax (334) 242-4554, Internet http://www.touralabama.org. ALASKA: Alaska Division of Tourism, P.O. Box 110801, Juneau, AK 99811-0801; tel. (907) 465-2010, fax (907) 465-2287, Internet http://www.travelalaska.
TRAVEL
June 21, 1998 | BILL SHERWONIT
On a Friday evening in late spring, the sun was still high, promising enough daylight hours for me to unwind in Chugach State Park, the "accessible wilderness" that borders the east side of this city. After only a 30-minute drive from my home downtown and a 45-minute hike up the park's Flattop Mountain, I gazed out across hundreds of square miles of south-central Alaska, from the 20,320-foot Denali (also known as Mt. McKinley) to the north to the Cook Inlet at my feet.
TRAVEL
May 18, 1997 | GERALD RENNER, HARTFORD COURANT; Renner is religion writer for the Courant, a Times Mirror newspaper based in Connecticut
It sounded like the ultimate macho trip: sea kayaking among the icebergs of Alaska from a wilderness base near a glacier. But the reality was quite different. It turned out to be one of the most family-friendly trips I had ever experienced, one in which we toured some of the world's greatest natural ice sculpture gardens and where bald eagles were as common as crows.
TRAVEL
March 3, 1996 | JON K. TILLINGHAST, Tillinghast is a freelance writer who lives in Juneau, Alaska
To my mind, the brown bear defines Alaska's wilderness. Maybe it's because humans aren't the boss here. There is still a towering predator patrolling this landscape, and that cold reality electrifies every foray into the Alaska back country. Last summer was my 21st in Alaska. The joy of each has been the time spent on a stream bank, watching a 1,000-pound bear stumble after salmon. I do this for the soul, mainly, but also for the serenity. Bear watching is a lonely undertaking.
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