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Juneteenth

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
"Strengthening the Family" is the theme of the 12th annual Juneteenth festivities on June 15. The public is invited to a day of gospel music, African arts and crafts, food and games. On June 19, 1865, Union soldiers landed in Galveston, Texas with news that the Civil War had ended and that the slaves had been freed, more than two years after the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1863. Juneteenth has since become an African American celebration of freedom from slavery.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2010 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
After spending months trying to convince Republican audiences that she is conservative to her core, GOP Senate nominee Carly Fiorina abruptly shifted strategy Saturday, campaigning in heavily Democratic South Los Angeles at a Juneteenth celebration where she was both warmly received and shouted down as a "two-faced liar" and a "turncoat." She strolled through Leimert Plaza Park with a traditional African scarf draped around her neck and a campaign photographer and videographer in tow — the visit grounded in political necessity as she looks ahead to a general election battle against Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer.
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NEWS
June 17, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Supporters of a national holiday for Juneteenth--the day when the last slaves in the United States learned they had been emancipated--will kick off a three-day lobbying effort today at the Lincoln Memorial, according to organizers. Juneteenth, a Texas, Oklahoma, Florida and Delaware state holiday, has its origins in Galveston, Texas, where, on June 19, 1865, Union Maj. Gen.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2008 | Chau Tu
WHEN IT comes to describing this year's Juneteenth festival in Long Beach, few songs are more appropriate than "Why Can't We Be Friends?" After all, the Saturday event in Martin Luther King Jr. Park celebrates Emancipation Day, also known as Juneteenth, the June 19 holiday commemorating the abolition of slavery in the U.S. Because of its historically large African American population, Long Beach has long been a setting for Juneteenth celebrations, says...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Keith Anderson chose to celebrate Juneteenth at the Autry Museum of Western Heritage in Griffith Park. Sometimes called the African-American Fourth of July, Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, the day an American general rode into Galveston, Texas, and announced the end of slavery. In fact, the Emancipation Proclamation freeing the slaves in the Confederate states had been signed by President Lincoln 2 1/2 years earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1998 | BRETT JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Stephen and Mika Williamson admitted to learning about Juneteenth only recently, the Agoura couple attended Saturday's celebration at Hansen Dam Park in Lake View Terrace to begin the cultural education of their two young children. "I want to try to teach my kids more African American history than my parents did to me," said Stephen Williamson, holding his 18-month-old daughter, Stephanie. His 2-year-old son, Tyler, giggled and tumbled between his mother's legs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1998 | BRETT JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Stephen and Mika Williamson learned about Juneteenth only recently, the Agoura couple attended Saturday's celebration at Hansen Dam Park for the first time to begin the cultural education of their two young children. "I want to try to teach my kids more African American history than my parents did to me," said Stephen Williamson, holding 18-month-old daughter Stephanie in his arms. His 2-year-old son, Tyler, giggled and tumbled between his mother's legs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2004 | Robert Hollis, Special to The Times
Black cowboys decked in traditional Old West regalia joined several hundred other marchers Saturday to commemorate Juneteenth, the day in 1865 that slaves in Texas belatedly learned that they were free. Among the marchers was James Hopkins, 38, a San Francisco truck driver and part-time bull-rider whose horse received cheers and applause as it pranced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2000 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That first celebration must have been joy in its purest form, so pure it traveled down through generations, until it reached those who had no memory of slavery; a joy shared with descendants, making sure they would always remember the moment their ancestors were freed. For those celebrating Juneteenth--the holiday marking the day when enslaved Africans in Texas learned they were free--the day is also becoming a time to reflect on what is needed for progress to continue.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2008 | Chau Tu
WHEN IT comes to describing this year's Juneteenth festival in Long Beach, few songs are more appropriate than "Why Can't We Be Friends?" After all, the Saturday event in Martin Luther King Jr. Park celebrates Emancipation Day, also known as Juneteenth, the June 19 holiday commemorating the abolition of slavery in the U.S. Because of its historically large African American population, Long Beach has long been a setting for Juneteenth celebrations, says...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2004 | Robert Hollis, Special to The Times
Black cowboys decked in traditional Old West regalia joined several hundred other marchers Saturday to commemorate Juneteenth, the day in 1865 that slaves in Texas belatedly learned that they were free. Among the marchers was James Hopkins, 38, a San Francisco truck driver and part-time bull-rider whose horse received cheers and applause as it pranced.
NEWS
June 17, 2004 | Duane Noriyuki
Retired librarian Barbara Clark remembers when a young boy came to her for a book about "Lincoln's constipation." What he meant, of course, was the Emancipation Proclamation. And there was the day her great-grandmother Winnie Carter Henderson, a slight woman with silver-gray hair and chestnut-brown skin, sat in a rocker and began her personal account of freedom with, "I must have been 4 or 5 years old the day the soldiers came."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
"Strengthening the Family" is the theme of the 12th annual Juneteenth festivities on June 15. The public is invited to a day of gospel music, African arts and crafts, food and games. On June 19, 1865, Union soldiers landed in Galveston, Texas with news that the Civil War had ended and that the slaves had been freed, more than two years after the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1863. Juneteenth has since become an African American celebration of freedom from slavery.
NEWS
June 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
For many blacks, Juneteenth is the real Independence Day. People across the country commemorated June 19, 1865, the day slaves in Texas learned of their freedom more than two years after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. The news came from Union troops who landed in Galveston. "It's a celebration of freedom that we finally got," said 48-year-old Austin resident Fennis Scott.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2001 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every June for the last decade, Ora Lincoln has come to Community Center Park West on Hobson Way in Oxnard, sat down with some barbecue and reflected on the day plantation slaves in Texas were set free. It happened June 15, 1865. Saturday, Lincoln and others remembered the plight of the Galveston, Texas, slaves at a Juneteenth festival at the park. "We need to keep our minds focused on where we really came from," Lincoln said as she sat on a picnic bench at the park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2001 | From Times staff reports
Oxnard's 11th annual festivities for Juneteenth, an African American holiday celebrating freedom from slavery, will take place Saturday. The public is invited to the day of gospel music by the Los Angeles Hope of Glory Christian Center Choir, African arts and crafts, games, a bike-a-thon, food and karaoke. Juneteenth marks the day slaves in Texas learned that slavery had ended--news that reached them 2 1/2 years late.
NEWS
June 17, 2004 | Duane Noriyuki
Retired librarian Barbara Clark remembers when a young boy came to her for a book about "Lincoln's constipation." What he meant, of course, was the Emancipation Proclamation. And there was the day her great-grandmother Winnie Carter Henderson, a slight woman with silver-gray hair and chestnut-brown skin, sat in a rocker and began her personal account of freedom with, "I must have been 4 or 5 years old the day the soldiers came."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Keith Anderson chose to celebrate Juneteenth at the Autry Museum of Western Heritage in Griffith Park. Sometimes called the African American Fourth of July, Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, the day an American general rode into Galveston, Texas, and announced the end of slavery. In fact, the Emancipation Proclamation freeing the slaves in the Confederate states had been issued by President Abraham Lincoln 2 1/2 years earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2000 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That first celebration must have been joy in its purest form, so pure it traveled down through generations, until it reached those who had no memory of slavery; a joy shared with descendants, making sure they would always remember the moment their ancestors were freed. For those celebrating Juneteenth--the holiday marking the day when enslaved Africans in Texas learned they were free--the day is also becoming a time to reflect on what is needed for progress to continue.
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