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Jung Chang

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NEWS
October 10, 1991 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jung Chang's 16th birthday is seared into her memory. There had been no celebration. It was March 25, 1968, and her hometown of Chengdu, in southwest China, was engulfed in Mao Tse-tung's Cultural Revolution. Red Guards raided her apartment repeatedly, searching for contraband books or other evidence of political incorrectness. Her parents, branded "capitalist roaders," had been tortured, beaten and thrown into detention.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2005 | Seth Faison, Special to The Times
Mao The Unknown Story Jung Chang and Jon Halliday Alfred A. Knopf: 704 pp., $35 * MAO TSE-TUNG still is worshipped widely in China as the greatest leader of modern times, admired as a powerful ruler who stood up to Confucian tradition and foreign domination, and heralded as a champion of the poor farmers who remain the majority of the nation's 1.3 billion people.
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BOOKS
September 15, 1991 | Edward Behr, Behr is the author of "The Last Emperor" and "Hirohito: Behind the Myth." His latest book is "Kiss the Hand You Cannot Bite: The Rise and Fall of the Ceausescus."
This real-life saga of a Chinese family over three generations contains more domestic drama than "Dynasty," more violence than any film noir, more heart-rending tragedy than "Little Dorrit" and more ironic twists and turns and villains on the make than any Balzacian fresco.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jung Chang's 16th birthday is seared into her memory. There had been no celebration. It was March 25, 1968, and her hometown of Chengdu, in southwest China, was engulfed in Mao Tse-tung's Cultural Revolution. Red Guards raided her apartment repeatedly, searching for contraband books or other evidence of political incorrectness. Her parents, branded "capitalist roaders," had been tortured, beaten and thrown into detention.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2005 | Seth Faison, Special to The Times
Mao The Unknown Story Jung Chang and Jon Halliday Alfred A. Knopf: 704 pp., $35 * MAO TSE-TUNG still is worshipped widely in China as the greatest leader of modern times, admired as a powerful ruler who stood up to Confucian tradition and foreign domination, and heralded as a champion of the poor farmers who remain the majority of the nation's 1.3 billion people.
NEWS
September 20, 1990
Alarge Glendale apartment complex located on land owned by the Glendale Unified School District is changing owners, but the transfer will not affect the revenues schools receive from the lease, district officials said Tuesday.
BOOKS
September 5, 1999
Valerie Gilbert, manicurist: "Memoirs of a Geisha" by Arthur Golden (Vintage). "This is an incredible book. I love the way Golden sets this book up, sharing with us the story of a geisha from her own perspective. So far, it's a gripping read. " *** Lisa Bowman, cabaret artist: "The Long Gray Line" by Rick Atkinson (Houghton Mifflin). "Atkinson really lets readers experience West Point in this beautifully researched book.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | Times Wire Services
A corner goal by Eun-jung Chang earned South Korea a 1-0 victory over Germany on Tuesday morning, but the Koreans had to wait all day to learn if their narrow victory was enough to get into the women's field hockey final. It was. Jenny Morris flicked in a corner shot to put Australia ahead in the 45th minute, and Danni Roche, Michelle Andrews and Alyson Annan added goals in a 4-0 victory over the Netherlands. The Dutch women had to beat Australia by five goals to qualify for the finals.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Bolt, the British playwright who turned to screenwriting and won Academy Awards for the scripts of "Dr. Zhivago" and "A Man for All Seasons," has died. He was 70. Bolt, who garnered a third Oscar nomination for his screenplay of "Lawrence of Arabia," died Monday night at his home near Petersfield, 70 miles southwest of London. The writer had a history of heart problems and had been partially disabled since a heart attack and stroke in 1983.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2000 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
To whatever lame financial extent, we pay our theatermakers to create visions for themselves and, depending on who "us" is, for us. Most paying customers prefer those visions neat and comforting. But in the hands of an artist such as Richard Foreman, founder of the Ontological-Hysteric Theatre in New York, we're happily plunged headlong into darker, dreamlike brain waves--a sea of anxiety, murky but bracing.
BOOKS
September 15, 1991 | Edward Behr, Behr is the author of "The Last Emperor" and "Hirohito: Behind the Myth." His latest book is "Kiss the Hand You Cannot Bite: The Rise and Fall of the Ceausescus."
This real-life saga of a Chinese family over three generations contains more domestic drama than "Dynasty," more violence than any film noir, more heart-rending tragedy than "Little Dorrit" and more ironic twists and turns and villains on the make than any Balzacian fresco.
SPORTS
June 4, 1990 | ALLAN MALAMUD
Humberto (Chiquita) Gonzalez of Mexico City will make his U.S. debut tonight when he defends his World Boxing Council junior-flyweight title against Luis Monzote of Miami at the Forum. The unbeaten Gonzalez, who has knocked out 20 of his 26 opponents, is being called a miniature Pipino Cuevas. However, unlike the former welterweight champion, he also plays some defense.
NEWS
May 9, 1991
"Clean up your room!" "Don't fight with your sister!" "Take out the trash!" "Be home by your curfew!" "Do as I say, not as I do!" Ahhhh, parents. . . . Can't live with them, can't live without them. With Mother's Day coming up Sunday and Father's Day on June 16, Hot Topics wonders, "What would you like to tell your parents?" "Thanks for being the best that you can be."
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