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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1997
Re "Disney Not Amused by Jungle Skippers' Unscripted Jokes," Oct. 13: This summer our 11-year-old grandson from Pennsylvania visited us and of course we went to Disneyland with his two California cousins and their mother. One of the highlights of the day was supposed to be the Jungle Cruise ride, which our out-of-town grandson was anxious to experience because his father had been a tour guide during the late '70s. (It was a plum job, much sought after at the time.) Our guide not only did not stick to the script, but was obnoxious and rude.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 29, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
With a reputation for squeaky-clean, family entertainment, Disneyland and neighboring Disney California Adventure have zero tolerance for misbehavior among workers. So when a theme park worker is accused of misconduct, the story usually makes headlines. The latest example came Wednesday when Christian Barnes, 22, an "outdoor vendor," was arrested in connection with a "dry-ice bomb" in the park . "We take matters like this very seriously and are working closely with local authorities," Disney spokeswoman Suzi Brown said of the latest incident.
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BUSINESS
May 2, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
When the last Jungle Cruise boat docks for the night and lights fade to black on Sleeping Beauty's Castle, the real work begins. At lush Pixie Hollow, gardeners don miner's headlamps as they begin uprooting stubborn weeds. On Main Street, custodians scrape chewing gum off the sidewalk. And over at Mickey's Toontown, painters sand and recoat chipped handrails. Few see it happen, except perhaps for the dozens of feral cats that emerge from their hiding places to prowl the park after hours, stalking rodents.
HOME & GARDEN
December 1, 2012 | Chris Erskine
The looping line at the Jungle Cruise is almost Euclidean in its use of space. Hundreds of us shuffle across that cramped boathouse entrance - standing, shuffling, standing. We snake upstairs and down, then back across one another, like capillaries in an old woman's leg. That we ever reach anyplace is something of a geometric miracle. Disneyland is full of miracles this holiday season, hyper-lighted and even more festive than usual. To me, D-Land never quite fulfills its promise as the Happiest Place on Earth.
NEWS
May 12, 1995 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disneyland, where for 40 years the Jungle Cruise operators have resembled rugged outdoorsmen and the Snow White character has looked like, well, Snow White, has begun tearing down sex barriers for many jobs. In the past month, women have begun taking guests on the circuitous Jungle Cruise past water-squirting elephants and stalking tigers, where only male guides had ventured before. And next month, men will begin relating the same fables as their female counterparts on the Storybook Land ride.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the fierce Disney jungle, where jokes rain down on tourists like an evening at the Improv, only the strong--and the really corny--survive. Taking advantage of a recent Jungle Cruise remodeling project, Disney comedy writers embarked on a major revision of its famed boat ride spiel, burying nearly one-fifth of the shtick that has been drawing guffaws and groans for decades. Gone are old knee-slappers like the one about the crocodile and the gorilla, written in 1980.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disneyland's famed Jungle Cruise has hit rough seas, and several of the ride's "skippers" have lost their jobs for veering from the company's official script and telling their own jokes to park guests. At least eight workers on the maritime attraction have been fired over the last few months after a "crackdown" by Disneyland on the unauthorized jokes, said Chad Gordon, who lost his job in August after refusing to stick with the script.
OPINION
October 21, 2004
I took my two kids to Disneyland for the first time two years ago, and they loved it. The Jungle Cruise was one of their favorites, and we were looking forward to a return voyage. But now I read that the Jungle Cruise captains are once again pretending to shoot the hippos ("Minor Disneyland Changes Make It More of a Jungle Out There," Oct. 18), and I guess we'll be skipping that ride next time, or perhaps the whole park. It's important that my kids learn kindness to animals, and even pretending to shoot wildlife makes them cringe, not smile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2001
Re "Disneyland Hanging Up Its Gun Belt," Sept. 3: I read where Disneyland is caving in to the politically correct crowd--again--this time by removing guns from skippers on the Jungle Cruise. I say we find out who these measly few, weak-kneed, lily-livered, scalawag PC types are, and after making them walk the plank, use them for alligator bait, then string them up from the highest yardarm. Bob Franz Placentia
OPINION
October 26, 2004
As director of park operations at the Disneyland Resort, I oversee the attractions throughout the resort, including the Jungle Cruise. After reading a letter (Oct. 21), I feel compelled to correct misinformation about the return of guns to the attraction. The guns, which are modified to shoot only blanks, are used in a fun and entertaining way to scare away mechanical hippos. At all times, the boat skippers are required to point their guns in the air, not at the hippos as the letter incorrectly stated.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
When the last Jungle Cruise boat docks for the night and lights fade to black on Sleeping Beauty's Castle, the real work begins. At lush Pixie Hollow, gardeners don miner's headlamps as they begin uprooting stubborn weeds. On Main Street, custodians scrape chewing gum off the sidewalk. And over at Mickey's Toontown, painters sand and recoat chipped handrails. Few see it happen, except perhaps for the dozens of feral cats that emerge from their hiding places to prowl the park after hours, stalking rodents.
OPINION
October 26, 2004
As director of park operations at the Disneyland Resort, I oversee the attractions throughout the resort, including the Jungle Cruise. After reading a letter (Oct. 21), I feel compelled to correct misinformation about the return of guns to the attraction. The guns, which are modified to shoot only blanks, are used in a fun and entertaining way to scare away mechanical hippos. At all times, the boat skippers are required to point their guns in the air, not at the hippos as the letter incorrectly stated.
OPINION
October 21, 2004
I took my two kids to Disneyland for the first time two years ago, and they loved it. The Jungle Cruise was one of their favorites, and we were looking forward to a return voyage. But now I read that the Jungle Cruise captains are once again pretending to shoot the hippos ("Minor Disneyland Changes Make It More of a Jungle Out There," Oct. 18), and I guess we'll be skipping that ride next time, or perhaps the whole park. It's important that my kids learn kindness to animals, and even pretending to shoot wildlife makes them cringe, not smile.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2004 | Kimi Yoshino, Times Staff Writer
Hippos beware: The Jungle Cruise skippers are packing heat again. And a caution to humans: Disneyland engineers are devising a safe way to return the stomach-churning spins to the teacups in the Mad Tea Party ride.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2001
Re "Disneyland Hanging Up Its Gun Belt," Sept. 3: I read where Disneyland is caving in to the politically correct crowd--again--this time by removing guns from skippers on the Jungle Cruise. I say we find out who these measly few, weak-kneed, lily-livered, scalawag PC types are, and after making them walk the plank, use them for alligator bait, then string them up from the highest yardarm. Bob Franz Placentia
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2001
Re "Disneyland Is Now Safe for Hippos," Sept. 3: What happened to imagination and a little fun? Back in the mid-'60s, though not nearly as high-tech as it is today, the Disney park was a land all its own. I have vivid memories of some of the shows the Disney performers put on at the park. Shows that would be impossible today. I will never forget the attack of Fort Wilderness on Tom Sawyer's Island. I watched in awe as actors dressed in Native American costume raided the fort as guests were taking a few minutes to drink something cool.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2004 | Kimi Yoshino, Times Staff Writer
Hippos beware: The Jungle Cruise skippers are packing heat again. And a caution to humans: Disneyland engineers are devising a safe way to return the stomach-churning spins to the teacups in the Mad Tea Party ride.
NEWS
October 13, 1997 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disneyland's famed Jungle Cruise has hit rough seas, and several of the ride's skippers have lost their jobs for veering from the company's official script and telling their own jokes to park guests. At least eight workers on the maritime attraction have been fired over the last few months after a crackdown by Disneyland on the unauthorized jokes, said Chad Gordon, who said he lost the job in August after refusing to stick with the script.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They took away the wench-chasing pirates. Now, they've stopped shooting the hippos. Disneyland officials, who say they're only keeping up with today's sensibilities, have quietly disarmed the skippers of the Jungle Cruise, raising eyebrows among fans of one of the park's oldest, most cherished attractions. No more do the wisecracking skippers reach for their Smith & Wessons and fire a few blanks at hippopotamuses emerging from the river bottom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1997
Re "Disney Not Amused by Jungle Skippers' Unscripted Jokes," Oct. 13: This summer our 11-year-old grandson from Pennsylvania visited us and of course we went to Disneyland with his two California cousins and their mother. One of the highlights of the day was supposed to be the Jungle Cruise ride, which our out-of-town grandson was anxious to experience because his father had been a tour guide during the late '70s. (It was a plum job, much sought after at the time.) Our guide not only did not stick to the script, but was obnoxious and rude.
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