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Jungle Cruise

BUSINESS
February 25, 1999 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It looks like someone may finally get the Swiss Family Robinson off that deserted island paradise. Disneyland is nearing final approval for a make-over of its venerable Swiss Family Treehouse, themed to this summer's release of Walt Disney Co.'s movie version of Tarzan, a park official said Wednesday. "We always do something to complement our animated features," the official noted.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 2000 | E. Scott Reckard, E. Scott Reckard covers tourism for The Times. He can be reached at (714) 966-7407 and at scott.reckard@latimes.com
As the days get longer, fine-tuning is underway for the busy summer season at the Magic Kingdom. Park workers expect that the musical theme from the "Believe" fireworks also will be used in the new "45 Years of Magic" parade, replacing the graduation march "Pomp and Circumstance." "It's not happening overnight. They have to work out the choreography. But by Memorial Day, it should be entirely different," one source at the park said.
OPINION
May 5, 2005
My 7-year-old daughter, my wife and I have just returned home to Vancouver after a week at Disneyland and the California Adventure park in Anaheim. After reading the "Walt's Kingdom" editorial in the L.A. Times April 30 on the flight back, I felt compelled to respond with a letter of thanks to everyone involved with continuing the magic that has always resided there since Disney opened the gates. I don't think the Disneyland trustees have to worry about the future of this great park. Even if you were to remove all the rides, you'd still have a beautifully landscaped park with its old-style architecture and waterfront restaurants.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald
The princess predicament is a problem as old as Disneyland. Moms want a picture of their little girls with a Disney princess while Dads and their bored boys squirm at the very notion of waiting 45 minutes for a photo op. Disneyland seems to have found a happy medium with the new Fantasy Faire , ushering the ladies through a conga line of princess meet-and-greets while the guys pass the time with a slapstick comedy designed to entertain the...
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The blurry, fuzzy concept art of a Shanghai Disneyland , filled with fireworks, spotlights and a great big castle, paints a picture short on details and vague on specifics about the planned project in China. So why all the secrecy on Disney's part? Three reasons: * To prevent knockoff rides by rival Asian theme parks, which happened before Hong Kong Disneyland's 2005 opening. * To preserve creative flexibility for Disney's Imagineers during the ongoing "Blue Sky" development phase, when rides, shows and even entire lands appear or disappear.
OPINION
January 12, 1997
No one should be surprised that the officials at Disneyland have courageously succumbed to political correctness in deciding to alter the venerable and venerated Pirates of the Caribbean (Jan. 4). After all, this is the same group that painted the gray submarines yellow (gray was too warlike) and instructed the Jungle Cruise skippers to stop shooting at the charging hippos. (Don't want to offend the animal-rights crowd.) As a former "cast member," I'm saddened to see Disneyland stoop to measures like this in a misguided effort to avoid offending anyone.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
Disneyland management and union representatives for 2,400 employees on Friday reported some progress in contract negotiations, with the amusement park raising its earlier offer of a 2% annual pay increase. The employees, whose jobs range from candy makers to Jungle Cruise operators, are scheduled to vote today on the three-year contract offer. Their contract expired at midnight Thursday. Employees will vote to accept or reject Disneyland's offer.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Walt Disney Co. on Wednesday unveiled details of a new Disneyland ride that it promises will be its creepiest yet. The Indiana Jones Adventure, being constructed between the main parking lot and Adventureland at a cost of more than $50 million, will feature a temple intentionally filled with fake bats, spiders, snakes and rats. When it opens next year, Disney officials said, the attraction will feature technology designed to give visitors a different experience every time they ride.
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