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Jungle Cruise

SPORTS
October 13, 2001
The last thing the Angels should be worrying about is trying to sign Troy Percival. A closer for Anaheim must feel like the Maytag repairman. Ralph S. Brax Lancaster Jim Edmonds is playing in his second consecutive postseason, while it is likely I will be collecting Social Security before the Angels ever get there again. I bring this point up because the Angels got very little for the alienated Edmonds when they traded him. The team is apparently bent on the same result, as the Angel front office devalues and angers Percival before putting him on the block.
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BUSINESS
February 25, 1999 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It looks like someone may finally get the Swiss Family Robinson off that deserted island paradise. Disneyland is nearing final approval for a make-over of its venerable Swiss Family Treehouse, themed to this summer's release of Walt Disney Co.'s movie version of Tarzan, a park official said Wednesday. "We always do something to complement our animated features," the official noted.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2006 | John Horn
JOHN LASSETER holds the keys to the kingdom. He really does. As part of the Disney-Pixar deal, the "Cars" director and Pixar executive vice president now has creative control not only over Disney's feature animation division but also its theme parks. Having worked on Disneyland's Jungle Cruise ride as a young man, the Magic Kingdom is familiar territory to Lasseter. Still, changes at the theme parks may take months to spot.
OPINION
May 5, 2005
My 7-year-old daughter, my wife and I have just returned home to Vancouver after a week at Disneyland and the California Adventure park in Anaheim. After reading the "Walt's Kingdom" editorial in the L.A. Times April 30 on the flight back, I felt compelled to respond with a letter of thanks to everyone involved with continuing the magic that has always resided there since Disney opened the gates. I don't think the Disneyland trustees have to worry about the future of this great park. Even if you were to remove all the rides, you'd still have a beautifully landscaped park with its old-style architecture and waterfront restaurants.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald
A 10,000-square-foot replica of the Disneyland Haunted Mansion attraction minus the 999 ghosts will go up for auction Wednesday on eBay for $873,000 or the next highest bid. Photos: A virtual tour of the Haunted Mansion replica home The ghostly retreat, custom-built in 1996, was designed to fit in with the New Orleans-style homes of the Sweet Bottom Plantation neighborhood, a private, gated community in Duluth, Ga., near Atlanta. The replica Haunted Mansion will be listed on eBay Auctions for 30 days starting Wednesday with a $873,000 Buy-It-Now price tag. The seller can accept or deny any lower bids.
OPINION
January 12, 1997
No one should be surprised that the officials at Disneyland have courageously succumbed to political correctness in deciding to alter the venerable and venerated Pirates of the Caribbean (Jan. 4). After all, this is the same group that painted the gray submarines yellow (gray was too warlike) and instructed the Jungle Cruise skippers to stop shooting at the charging hippos. (Don't want to offend the animal-rights crowd.) As a former "cast member," I'm saddened to see Disneyland stoop to measures like this in a misguided effort to avoid offending anyone.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
Disneyland management and union representatives for 2,400 employees on Friday reported some progress in contract negotiations, with the amusement park raising its earlier offer of a 2% annual pay increase. The employees, whose jobs range from candy makers to Jungle Cruise operators, are scheduled to vote today on the three-year contract offer. Their contract expired at midnight Thursday. Employees will vote to accept or reject Disneyland's offer.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Walt Disney Co. on Wednesday unveiled details of a new Disneyland ride that it promises will be its creepiest yet. The Indiana Jones Adventure, being constructed between the main parking lot and Adventureland at a cost of more than $50 million, will feature a temple intentionally filled with fake bats, spiders, snakes and rats. When it opens next year, Disney officials said, the attraction will feature technology designed to give visitors a different experience every time they ride.
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