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Jungle Fever Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1991
When he left here two years ago, Spike Lee was as angry as "Do the Right Thing," the movie he had brought with him. The young New York filmmaker proved an ungracious loser, criticizing the Cannes Film Festival jury for overlooking his picture, and for having given the coveted Golden Palm award to Steven Soderbergh's "sex, lies, and videotape." Thursday, he returned with another angry film, "Jungle Fever," but he said his own anger is behind him.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1991 | ITABARI NJERI, Itabari Njeri, a staff writer for The Times, is the winner of the 1990 American Book Award for her family memoir, "Every Good-bye Ain't Gone." Her next book, "The Last Plantation," explores ethnic identity and conflict in America and will be published by Random House next year
Once, I was an infantile black nationalist like Spike Lee. It was the early '70s, and I was a very angry teen-ager. My father had been a classical scholar whose life was circumscribed by race. He died from the cumulative effects of white rejection and alcoholism--the bills from the neighborhood liquor store stuck between the pages of the book he'd spent his life writing: "The Tolono Station and Beyond," an examination of liberty in the United States.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1991 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic.
She's gone black-boy crazy I've gone white-girl hazy We're each other's baby We're in love Yes, it's Stevie Wonder singing Spike Lee. No, the filmmaker isn't writing songs, but "Jungle Fever," Lee's provocative new film about an interracial love affair and the tensions surrounding it, inspired Wonder to record his first album in four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1991 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic.
She's gone black-boy crazy I've gone white-girl hazy We're each other's baby We're in love Yes, it's Stevie Wonder singing Spike Lee. No, the filmmaker isn't writing songs, but "Jungle Fever," Lee's provocative new film about an interracial love affair and the tensions surrounding it, inspired Wonder to record his first album in four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1991 | ITABARI NJERI, Itabari Njeri, a staff writer for The Times, is the winner of the 1990 American Book Award for her family memoir, "Every Good-bye Ain't Gone." Her next book, "The Last Plantation," explores ethnic identity and conflict in America and will be published by Random House next year
Once, I was an infantile black nationalist like Spike Lee. It was the early '70s, and I was a very angry teen-ager. My father had been a classical scholar whose life was circumscribed by race. He died from the cumulative effects of white rejection and alcoholism--the bills from the neighborhood liquor store stuck between the pages of the book he'd spent his life writing: "The Tolono Station and Beyond," an examination of liberty in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Jungle' Threats: Extra security measures were taken Thursday at video stores across Rhode Island because of a letter threatening violence if the outlets rented or displayed Spike Lee's "Jungle Fever," a movie about a romance between a white woman and a black man. The video version of the 1991 film became available Thursday for the first time. While state and federal authorities have been unable to locate the self-professed "skinhead" who sent the letter on Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1991
When he left here two years ago, Spike Lee was as angry as "Do the Right Thing," the movie he had brought with him. The young New York filmmaker proved an ungracious loser, criticizing the Cannes Film Festival jury for overlooking his picture, and for having given the coveted Golden Palm award to Steven Soderbergh's "sex, lies, and videotape." Thursday, he returned with another angry film, "Jungle Fever," but he said his own anger is behind him.
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