Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJuni Dahr
IN THE NEWS

Juni Dahr

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Everyone, it seems, is fascinated by Joan of Arc. We've had Maxwell Anderson's Joan. We've had Jean Anouilh's. We've had Shaw's and others. None, arguably, work very well on stage, mostly because Joan is approached with such reverence . A lot of people, especially actors, would strongly dispute this. Joan, they would tell you, was a peasant. They would quibble over the definition of reverence. But playing Joan with reverence doesn't always mean playing her as a saint.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
The struggle of women for recognition and equality seems as contemporary as the ERA but is, in truth, as old as gender itself, and Sappho, Boadicea and Joan of Arc. Down the decades the desires and the frustrations have been observed and enunciated by men as well as women. In modern times, Ingmar Bergman's "Scenes From a Marriage" caught poignantly the tugs and pride of rising consciousness and the thrust to liberation.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
The struggle of women for recognition and equality seems as contemporary as the ERA but is, in truth, as old as gender itself, and Sappho, Boadicea and Joan of Arc. Down the decades the desires and the frustrations have been observed and enunciated by men as well as women. In modern times, Ingmar Bergman's "Scenes From a Marriage" caught poignantly the tugs and pride of rising consciousness and the thrust to liberation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Everyone, it seems, is fascinated by Joan of Arc. We've had Maxwell Anderson's Joan. We've had Jean Anouilh's. We've had Shaw's and others. None, arguably, work very well on stage, mostly because Joan is approached with such reverence . A lot of people, especially actors, would strongly dispute this. Joan, they would tell you, was a peasant. They would quibble over the definition of reverence. But playing Joan with reverence doesn't always mean playing her as a saint.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1991 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Ibsen Women" emblazoned on a theater marquee on the Sunset Strip may not stop traffic. But Juni Dahr, the Norwegian actress performing solo inside the Tiffany Theatre, does cast a spell that animates the quest of some of the most powerful female characters written for the stage. There's something primal about Dahr's inspiration. She says it came from playing Hjordis in Henrik Ibsen's saga "Vikings of Helgeland."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1991 | JANICE ARKATOV, Janice Arkatov writes about theater for The Times
Gay teen-agers are the subjects--and authors--of "People Who Live in Glass Houses," which is playing Nov. 10 and 11 at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica. The work is a dramatic exploration of contemporary social and sexual identification. The show's director, Norma Bowles, works with troubled youths as part of a local social services group.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Don't tell Juni Dahr that Joan of Arc is a heroine. "She's not heroic," the gorgeously cheekboned Norwegian actress said firmly. "She was not a saint (although canonized in 1920). She was not an angel. She had doubts. She's real . It's important that people know that. She was flesh and blood, a peasant girl who lived close to nature, walked in the fields with her cows. She cut her hair short, was one of the first women to put on men's clothes. I find her remarkable--but very human."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Tough to tell the hour when fame and fortune, like lightning, strikes. The oatmeal advocate Wilford Brimley made it to Hollywood with a measured amount of maturity. Another advocate of a sort, Ruth Westheimer, did the same. And not to be forgotten, Clara Peller, who found late-in-life acclaim asking about the organic structure of hamburger.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Hot off the presses: Simon Callow, who translated and directed last year's classy production of Milan Kundera's "Jacques and His Master," will come back to the Los Angeles Theatre Center next fall to stage Lope de Vega's "Fuente Ovejuna" ("Sheep's Well") and Schiller's "Don Carlos," back to back. The mega-object: to try to create a resident company.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1991 | LISBET NILSON, Nilson writes regularly about art for Westside/Valley Calendar
Nobody has actually come right out and told Bess Cutler she is crazy to open a Los Angeles branch of her New York gallery at a time when contemporary art galleries everywhere--and in New York's SoHo particularly--are either just hanging on, scaling back or even closing down entirely.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|