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Junichiro Koizumi

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BUSINESS
April 27, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new economic team appointed Thursday by incoming Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi sends a strong message through its inclusion of outsiders that reform will be more than a campaign pledge. Somewhat less heartening, however, is the lack of hard-nosed experience needed to bring about Koizumi's rather vaguely outlined reforms and tackle Japan's deep-seated problems, economists and market watchers say.
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WORLD
September 17, 2006 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
"Junichiro Koizumi here." For five years, that simple salutation has greeted subscribers to the "Koizumi Cabinet E-Mail Magazine," an experiment in digital politics that saw the prime minister of Japan knocking on 1.6 million inboxes every Thursday morning. Scrawled by Koizumi himself, and typed into a computer by his staff, the e-mails let everyone know what he'd been up to and what was on his mind. They also offered plenty of unsolicited advice on how people might improve their lives.
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NEWS
April 24, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Quixotic reformer Junichiro Koizumi is virtually certain to become Japan's next prime minister after a groundswell of grass-roots support over the weekend ensured his election today as ruling-party president. Normally obedient rank-and-file members of the Liberal Democratic Party, which has ruled Japan for most of the last five decades, defied power brokers and slammed home the message that without a new way of doing things, the LDP can't survive.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2006 | Peter Wallsten, Times Staff Writer
President Bush doesn't get a lot of tender love these days on the world stage. But Friday, taking his Japanese counterpart on a private tour of Graceland, Bush received a hunk of burning love. Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi -- calling it a "dream" to see the home of his longtime idol, Elvis Presley -- was reduced to almost uncontrollably giddy giggling as he broke into a serenade for Bush and First Lady Laura Bush and for Presley's ex-wife, Priscilla, and their daughter, Lisa Marie.
WORLD
January 1, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi started the New Year by visiting a shrine honoring Japan's war dead, a decision that is certain to rile countries in Asia that Japan invaded and brutally occupied last century. The prime minister has insisted on making annual trips to Tokyo's Yasukuni shrine, which honors about 2.5 million war dead, including executed criminals such as war-era Prime Minister Hideki Tojo. Japan's neighbors say the shrine glorifies Japan's militaristic past.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | Associated Press
Japan's bruising battle for a new leader gained momentum after a renegade Cabinet minister joined two veteran politicians in the contest to replace resigning Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto. Junichiro Koizumi, the 55-year-old health and welfare minister who entered the race Saturday, is promising big tax cuts to boost the economy and a radical streamlining of government.
WORLD
June 14, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Japan's Supreme Court will rule next week on a suit challenging the constitutionality of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's visits to a Tokyo war shrine, court officials said. The ruling on a lawsuit filed by relatives of Japanese, Chinese and South Korean war dead would be the first time that Japan's top court has weighed in on whether the visits violate the division between religion and the state, a court official said.
WORLD
April 7, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A regional court ruled that a visit by Prime Minster Junichiro Koizumi to a Tokyo war shrine violated Japan's Constitution, media reported. The visit to Yasukuni shrine was religious in nature and violated the division between religion and state, said Kiyonaga Kamegawa, chief justice of Fukuoka District Court. The ruling came in a lawsuit by 211 activists, who were denied their request for $200,000 in damages.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi had only one request when Richard Gere visited his office Tuesday: "Shall we dance?" Gere, who is in Japan to promote his latest film, the Hollywood remake of the Japanese box-office hit "Shall We Dance," accepted Koizumi's invitation but insisted that he would lead. It's not the first time the media-savvy Koizumi has put on a performance with a Hollywood star.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | Associated Press
New Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi sought Friday to allay fears in Asia about his hawkish views, saying his nation must learn the lessons of its imperialist past. In his first news conference since being elected prime minister, Koizumi reached out to neighbors who have expressed anger over his support for official visits to a controversial war shrine and calls for a wider military role for Japan.
WORLD
June 27, 2006 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Junichiro Koizumi is about to leave the building. After five years as Japan's prime minister, the curtain is coming down on the leader who alternately charmed and bullied his country into overhauling atrophied political and economic systems, while casting its lot more deeply with Washington. Japan is already on the cusp of the post-Koizumi era. The race to succeed him is underway, lending a victory-lap aura to the prime minister's visit to Washington, which begins Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2006 | From the Associated Press
When Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi tours Graceland later this month with President Bush, he will be representing a big constituency -- Japan has droves of Elvis Presley fans, and the biggest Elvis fan club in east Asia. Koizumi, of course, is the most famous. He notes with pride that he shares a Jan. 8 birthday with Elvis. Last year he serenaded Bush with "I Want You, I Need You, I Love You" at a birthday party for the president.
WORLD
June 14, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Japan's Supreme Court will rule next week on a suit challenging the constitutionality of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's visits to a Tokyo war shrine, court officials said. The ruling on a lawsuit filed by relatives of Japanese, Chinese and South Korean war dead would be the first time that Japan's top court has weighed in on whether the visits violate the division between religion and the state, a court official said.
WORLD
February 8, 2006 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
You don't mess with 1,500 years of tradition and a link to the Sun Goddess without provoking a fight, so perhaps it should be no surprise that a backlash has materialized against Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's plan to allow women to ascend to Japan's imperial throne. But the gathering tempest over what seemed to be just another of Koizumi's modernizing steps is a measure of how his iron grip on Japanese politics has weakened in recent weeks.
WORLD
September 17, 2005 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
It has been a strange postelection week in Japan. When they went to the polls Sunday in greater numbers than at any time since the Cold War, voters handed Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi one of the most decisive victories in Japan's political history. Then they went back to work Monday morning wondering what they'd done, like the sedate businessman who wakes up after drinking too much sake, trying to recall what songs he sang at karaoke the night before.
OPINION
September 10, 2005
JAPAN'S LIBERAL DEMOCRATIC PARTY has governed the country for half a century almost without interruption; its current leader, Junichiro Koizumi, has been prime minister for more than four years, an unusually long time in Japan. Now Koizumi is risking his record and the party's tenure by dissolving Parliament and calling new elections, ostensibly over the obscure topic of post office savings accounts. It's a gamble he deserves to win.
WORLD
September 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's political future at home is uncertain ahead of parliamentary elections. But in Honduras, his image is really worth something. The government of Honduras will issue commemorative coins bearing an image of Koizumi to mark the 70th anniversary of diplomatic relations between the two countries, Japan's Foreign Ministry said. The 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2006 | From the Associated Press
When Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi tours Graceland later this month with President Bush, he will be representing a big constituency -- Japan has droves of Elvis Presley fans, and the biggest Elvis fan club in east Asia. Koizumi, of course, is the most famous. He notes with pride that he shares a Jan. 8 birthday with Elvis. Last year he serenaded Bush with "I Want You, I Need You, I Love You" at a birthday party for the president.
WORLD
September 6, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's political future at home is uncertain ahead of parliamentary elections. But in Honduras, his image is really worth something. The government of Honduras will issue commemorative coins bearing an image of Koizumi to mark the 70th anniversary of diplomatic relations between the two countries, Japan's Foreign Ministry said. The 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi had only one request when Richard Gere visited his office Tuesday: "Shall we dance?" Gere, who is in Japan to promote his latest film, the Hollywood remake of the Japanese box-office hit "Shall We Dance," accepted Koizumi's invitation but insisted that he would lead. It's not the first time the media-savvy Koizumi has put on a performance with a Hollywood star.
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