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Junior Brown

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD
The trip from Hank to Hendrix is a short one with Junior Brown at the wheel. The guitarist from Austin, Tex., plays traditional honky-tonk that is flawlessly authentic, but with enough accents of Jimi, surf and other styles to keep his music, and his audience, a little off-balance. He brought that sly mixture to Jacks Sugar Shack over the weekend, serenading Friday's crowd with his warm baritone on witty and heartbroken odes to Ernest Tubb, the Highway Patrol and a singing janitor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2001
SANTA ANA 8pm Pop Music Junior Brown remains in a universe of his own, one where vintage country music coexists peacefully, albeit often raucously, with blues, rock and surf music, all fired out through his unique guitar/steel-guitar hybrid called a guit-steel. His live shows are consistently jaw-dropping affairs. * Junior Brown, Galaxy Concert Theatre, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana. With Todd Steadman & the Fat Tones, Uncle Jake. 8 p.m. $8 to $10. (714) 957-0600.
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NEWS
January 6, 1994 | RANDY LEWIS
This singer-songwriter-guitarist from Austin is two-thirds of a real find. With a booming bass-baritone that recalls the likes of Johnny Cash and Tennessee Ernie Ford and an extraordinary facility on the "guit-steel," his own double-necked hybrid of an electric guitar and a lap steel, Brown creates an instantly definable presence on his major-label debut album. In the best of its dozen songs--10 of which Brown wrote--he sings with the authority of country music's founding fathers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1999 | ROBYN LOEWENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the uninitiated television viewer, country guitar picker Junior Brown is that guy in commercials who wears a seriously Texan-style dip-and-roll brim cowboy hat while playing a double-necked guitar. But devotees of the performing songwriter admire Brown for his musical wizardry on his self-made "guit steel" (guitar). The baritone's style evokes the influences of Chet Atkins, Elvis, Bob Wills and rock music's best "shredders" rolled into one.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Junior Brown apparently started out from the same point--basic surf-guitar licks--as many a typical rock 'n' roll kid of the 1960s. This may or may not be of some comfort to all of the celebrated electric-guitar heroes (i.e., virtually every one of them) who today can't touch him. Brown capped his set Saturday night at the Galaxy Concert Theatre with a medley of surf instrumentals, songs he has been playing since his Indiana boyhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2001
SANTA ANA 8pm Pop Music Junior Brown remains in a universe of his own, one where vintage country music coexists peacefully, albeit often raucously, with blues, rock and surf music, all fired out through his unique guitar/steel-guitar hybrid called a guit-steel. His live shows are consistently jaw-dropping affairs. * Junior Brown, Galaxy Concert Theatre, 3503 S. Harbor Blvd., Santa Ana. With Todd Steadman & the Fat Tones, Uncle Jake. 8 p.m. $8 to $10. (714) 957-0600.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1995 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
His voice is as vast and deep as a back-country well in the piney woods of Texas, like Ernest Tubb with a moonshine hangover. The twanging strings of his guitar cut like a newly honed scythe, bubbling and speeding with a graceful precision that recalls the halcyon days of Jimmy Bryant and Speedy West.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1998 | ROBERT HILBURN
Part of what makes Brown such a delight in the staid world of '90s country music is his aggressively eccentric path. He may wear a cowboy hat like so many of today's colorless country stars, but it seems to really belong there--it's not just a prop that comes off at the end of the show. In albums and on stage, Brown performs engagingly in a '40s-minded, honky-tonk style that merges the passionate but formal country tradition of Ernest Tubb with the looser, good-time spirit of Hank Thompson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1999 | ROBYN LOEWENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the uninitiated television viewer, country guitar picker Junior Brown is that guy in commercials who wears a seriously Texan-style dip-and-roll brim cowboy hat while playing a double-necked guitar. But devotees of the performing songwriter admire Brown for his musical wizardry on his self-made "guit steel" (guitar). The baritone's style evokes the influences of Chet Atkins, Elvis, Bob Wills and rock music's best "shredders" rolled into one.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
You get the feeling sometimes that the Mavericks and Junior Brown don't know whether they are coming or going. During their separate sets Friday night at the Greek Theatre, it was frequently hard to tell if you were watching two contemporary country acts or an oldies revue. Are we speaking 1996 or 1956? The Mavericks and Brown combine the impulses and sounds of those decades in ways that showcase both delectable charms and frustrating limitations.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A memorable production of Beauty and the Beast played the Coach House on Friday night, and no, this was not a first experiment in children's theater for the venerable San Juan Capistrano concert club. Beauty was Allison Moorer, a newcomer who may be the platonic ideal of a female country singer. Gorgeous in tight jeans and flowing red tresses, the 26-year-old singer-songwriter from rural Alabama is being deservedly heralded for her just-released debut album, "Alabama Song."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1998 | ROBERT HILBURN
Part of what makes Brown such a delight in the staid world of '90s country music is his aggressively eccentric path. He may wear a cowboy hat like so many of today's colorless country stars, but it seems to really belong there--it's not just a prop that comes off at the end of the show. In albums and on stage, Brown performs engagingly in a '40s-minded, honky-tonk style that merges the passionate but formal country tradition of Ernest Tubb with the looser, good-time spirit of Hank Thompson.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
You get the feeling sometimes that the Mavericks and Junior Brown don't know whether they are coming or going. During their separate sets Friday night at the Greek Theatre, it was frequently hard to tell if you were watching two contemporary country acts or an oldies revue. Are we speaking 1996 or 1956? The Mavericks and Brown combine the impulses and sounds of those decades in ways that showcase both delectable charms and frustrating limitations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1996 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
In his music and videos, Junior Brown exudes the sweet, simple feel of someone who would be right at home on a bus bench next to Forrest Gump. The singer and guitarist, 43, gazes at the world through slightly bugged eyes and dresses in the Western hats and suits favored by country singers in the '40s. He could fit right in, as himself, in a TV remake of Andy Griffith's old Mayberry show. It's as easy to smile at Brown's music as at his manner.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Junior Brown apparently started out from the same point--basic surf-guitar licks--as many a typical rock 'n' roll kid of the 1960s. This may or may not be of some comfort to all of the celebrated electric-guitar heroes (i.e., virtually every one of them) who today can't touch him. Brown capped his set Saturday night at the Galaxy Concert Theatre with a medley of surf instrumentals, songs he has been playing since his Indiana boyhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1995 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
His voice is as vast and deep as a back-country well in the piney woods of Texas, like Ernest Tubb with a moonshine hangover. The twanging strings of his guitar cut like a newly honed scythe, bubbling and speeding with a graceful precision that recalls the halcyon days of Jimmy Bryant and Speedy West.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A memorable production of Beauty and the Beast played the Coach House on Friday night, and no, this was not a first experiment in children's theater for the venerable San Juan Capistrano concert club. Beauty was Allison Moorer, a newcomer who may be the platonic ideal of a female country singer. Gorgeous in tight jeans and flowing red tresses, the 26-year-old singer-songwriter from rural Alabama is being deservedly heralded for her just-released debut album, "Alabama Song."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1996 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
In his music and videos, Junior Brown exudes the sweet, simple feel of someone who would be right at home on a bus bench next to Forrest Gump. The singer and guitarist, 43, gazes at the world through slightly bugged eyes and dresses in the Western hats and suits favored by country singers in the '40s. He could fit right in, as himself, in a TV remake of Andy Griffith's old Mayberry show. It's as easy to smile at Brown's music as at his manner.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1994 | STEVE APPLEFORD
The trip from Hank to Hendrix is a short one with Junior Brown at the wheel. The guitarist from Austin, Tex., plays traditional honky-tonk that is flawlessly authentic, but with enough accents of Jimi, surf and other styles to keep his music, and his audience, a little off-balance. He brought that sly mixture to Jacks Sugar Shack over the weekend, serenading Friday's crowd with his warm baritone on witty and heartbroken odes to Ernest Tubb, the Highway Patrol and a singing janitor.
NEWS
January 6, 1994 | RANDY LEWIS
This singer-songwriter-guitarist from Austin is two-thirds of a real find. With a booming bass-baritone that recalls the likes of Johnny Cash and Tennessee Ernie Ford and an extraordinary facility on the "guit-steel," his own double-necked hybrid of an electric guitar and a lap steel, Brown creates an instantly definable presence on his major-label debut album. In the best of its dozen songs--10 of which Brown wrote--he sings with the authority of country music's founding fathers.
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