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Junior High Schools Enrollment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 8,000 junior high school students in the Los Angeles Unified School District dropped out last year, offering troubling evidence that junior highs--as well as high schools--have a serious dropout problem. Many local educators say the new findings suggest that junior high--an institution often described as being caught in the middle, lacking direction and adequate resources--may be in sore need of an overhaul. A recent report from the district's dropout prevention office showed that 7.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 8,000 junior high school students in the Los Angeles Unified School District dropped out last year, offering troubling evidence that junior highs--as well as high schools--have a serious dropout problem. Many local educators say the new findings suggest that junior high--an institution often described as being caught in the middle, lacking direction and adequate resources--may be in sore need of an overhaul. A recent report from the district's dropout prevention office showed that 7.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1991 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite statistics showing that San Fernando Valley schools had fewer dropouts on average than schools citywide, district officials fear the rate will skyrocket next year if proposed budget cuts slash into programs designed to keep youths in school. Nearly 14% of high school students and 5.5% of junior high school students dropped out of Valley schools during the 1989-90 year, compared with 16.2% of all high school students and 7.
NEWS
February 24, 1985 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
Anthony Ford, a muscular student-athlete, was almost a statistic. Had he not changed his mind, he would have been one of an estimated 2,500 former Compton students who attend school, both legally and illegally, in neighboring cities. The students' departures, officials say, cost Compton Unified School District more than $5 million annually and reinforce the perception that schools here are not as good as others nearby.
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