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August 11, 1989
Seven frozen embryos at issue in an unprecedented divorce trial should be in their mother's womb, "not in the fridge," a doctor testified. Jerome Lejeune, director of research at the French National Center of Scientific Research, testified in the divorce trial of Junior Lewis Davis and Mary Sue Davis in Maryville, Tenn. The trial concluded after three days, with Judge W. Dale Young saying he would rule within 30 days.
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NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge's decision to give legal protection to seven frozen human embryos went far beyond his authority and should be overturned, a lawyer said in an appeal. The ruling was made last September in the divorce case of Junior Lewis Davis and Mary Sue Davis. The only issue was what to do with the eggs that resulted from in-vitro fertilization. Mrs. Davis testified she wanted the embryos in an attempt to have children. Davis said he did not want the embryos used in any fashion without his consent.
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NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge's decision to give legal protection to seven frozen human embryos went far beyond his authority and should be overturned, a lawyer said in an appeal. The ruling was made last September in the divorce case of Junior Lewis Davis and Mary Sue Davis. The only issue was what to do with the eggs that resulted from in-vitro fertilization. Mrs. Davis testified she wanted the embryos in an attempt to have children. Davis said he did not want the embryos used in any fashion without his consent.
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
In a decision that could have far-reaching ethical, medical and legal implications, a Tennessee judge Thursday awarded custody of seven frozen embryos to a wife embroiled in a divorce case, ruling that "human life begins at conception." Circuit Court Judge W. Dale Young ruled the fertilized eggs should go to Mary Sue Davis, who wants to implant them and carry them to term--against the wishes of her estranged husband, Junior Lewis Davis. At a news conference in Titusville, Fla.
NEWS
September 22, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
In a decision that could have far-reaching ethical, medical and legal implications, a Tennessee judge Thursday awarded custody of seven frozen embryos to a wife embroiled in a divorce case, ruling that "human life begins at conception." Circuit Court Judge W. Dale Young ruled the fertilized eggs should go to Mary Sue Davis, who wants to implant them and carry them to term--against the wishes of her estranged husband, Junior Lewis Davis. At a news conference in Titusville, Fla.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Tennessee Court of Appeals today granted joint custody of seven frozen embryos to a divorced couple, overturning a landmark ruling that had granted custody to the ex-wife. The intermediate-level appeals court ruled in the divorce case of Junior Lewis Davis of Maryville and his former wife, Mary Sue Davis Stowe, now of Titusville, Fla. "It would be repugnant and offensive to constitutional principals to order Mary Sue to implant these fertilized ova against her will," Judge Herschel P.
NEWS
March 3, 1989 | From Times wire service s
A couple in the midst of a divorce are fighting for custody of the fertilized eggs they put in frozen storage a few years ago. Junior Lewis Davis, 30, says he does not want his wife, Mary Sue Davis, 28, to become pregnant, and a judge has issued an order temporarily blocking her from having the embryos implanted. Despite Davis' divorce petition and his objection to becoming a father, his wife has said she eventually plans to have the eggs implanted, according to the complaint.
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
An estranged couple's fight over the fate of seven fertilized human eggs goes to court today. Junior Lewis Davis seeks to prevent his wife, Mary Sue Davis, from attempting to become pregnant with any of the eggs now that they are getting divorced. Davis says he no longer wants to have a child with her. The eggs were taken from Mrs. Davis and fertilized with Davis' sperm in an in-vitro fertilization program the couple entered six years ago in hopes of having a so-called "test-tube baby."
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | from Associated Press
A woman's decision to donate seven frozen embryos she won in a custody fight, rather than use them to become pregnant, does not end the battle, her ex-husband said Friday. "I am totally against it," Junior Lewis Davis, who produced the sperm for the embryos, said of his ex-wife's decision to donate them to another childless couple. "There is just no way I am going to donate them," Davis said. "I feel that's my right. If there was a child from them, then I would be a parent to it.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Tennessee Court of Appeals on Thursday granted joint custody of seven frozen embryos to a divorced couple, overturning a landmark ruling that had granted custody to the ex-wife. Charles Clifford, attorney for the ex-husband, fell to his knees at the courthouse on seeing the opinion and said: "All right, thank you. Justice is done."
NEWS
August 11, 1989
Seven frozen embryos at issue in an unprecedented divorce trial should be in their mother's womb, "not in the fridge," a doctor testified. Jerome Lejeune, director of research at the French National Center of Scientific Research, testified in the divorce trial of Junior Lewis Davis and Mary Sue Davis in Maryville, Tenn. The trial concluded after three days, with Judge W. Dale Young saying he would rule within 30 days.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | From Associated Press
A woman who won a bitter custody battle for seven frozen embryos says she no longer wants them and will donate them to her fertility clinic in the hope that someone else can use them. Mary Sue Stowe described her decision in papers filed with the Tennessee Court of Appeals. Her ex-husband, Junior Lewis Davis, has appealed a ruling in the couple's divorce case last September that granted her temporary custody over the embryos.
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