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Junipero Serra

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NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Frank Sotomayor
Besides being a man of faith, Junipero Serra, the Franciscan friar who founded nine California missions, is a tourist draw -- and perhaps not just in California. The resort isles of Mallorca and Ibiza are already tourist magnets among Spain's many destinations. Now, Spanish tourist officials are giving an extra push to promoting the attractions of those two Mediterranean isles, along with Menorca and Formentera , two of the smaller Balearic Islands. The promotion coincides with Serra's 300 th   birthday on Sunday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
To live in Southern California is to feel unmoored from history. Throughout the 20th century, assorted city and state officials and developers routinely destroyed and obliterated landmarks and old neighborhoods, creating the illusion of Los Angeles and its suburbs as a perpetually new place. But the writing of Southern California history has entered a kind of golden age in recent years. My own personal favorites include William Estrada's excellent and often enthralling 2008 “The Los Angeles Plaza,” and William Deverell's ground-breaking 2005 “Whitewashed Adobe: The Rise of Los Angeles and the Remaking of its Mexican Past.” As 2013 rounds to a close, three more books of L.A. history have reached my desk.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The 21 Spanish missions stretching from San Diego to Sonoma have been emblematic of early California for centuries -- and have been the subject of reports for generations of grade schoolers. The Huntington Library announced Tuesday it will host an expansive exhibition of mission-related artifacts, featuring nearly 250 objects from 60 lenders across the United States, Mexico and Spain. "Junípero Serra and the Legacies of the California Missions," which will run Aug. 17 to Jan. 6, coincides with the 300th anniversary of Serra's birth.
NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Frank Sotomayor
Besides being a man of faith, Junipero Serra, the Franciscan friar who founded nine California missions, is a tourist draw -- and perhaps not just in California. The resort isles of Mallorca and Ibiza are already tourist magnets among Spain's many destinations. Now, Spanish tourist officials are giving an extra push to promoting the attractions of those two Mediterranean isles, along with Menorca and Formentera , two of the smaller Balearic Islands. The promotion coincides with Serra's 300 th   birthday on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
It's a scholastic rite of passage for every California fourth-grader: studying the history of the Spanish Catholic missions and the life of Father Junípero Serra. Steven W. Hackel remembers the drill. "We were taught that Father Serra was a good, gentle padre who built missions every one-day's horseback ride apart for tired travelers, as sort of like Motel 6's of the day," says Hackel, a UC Riverside associate professor of history and author of a new biography of Serra. "And there was nothing about Indians in those missions at all. " Finding the complex man of God wrapped inside the saintly myth and putting the missing indigenous Americans back into the picture, are lead objectives of an exhibition scheduled to open Aug. 17 at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens and run through Jan. 6. PHOTOS: Junipero Serra exhibition Titled "Junípero Serra and the Legacies of the California Missions" and co-curated by Hackel and Catherine Gudis, also a UC Riverside associate professor of history, it's perhaps the most comprehensive exhibition ever assembled about the devout Franciscan friar who established nine of the 21 missions in present-day California and is sometimes called the state's "founding father.
MAGAZINE
March 18, 2001 | Patt Morrison
Whatever the reviews of his work in California--and they run from "saintly" to "genocidal"--in his hometown of Petra on the Spanish island of Majorca, Junipero Serra is the local boy who left home and made very, very good. Here Father Serra began the odyssey that has put him in line for Catholic sainthood. The plaque at the church where he was baptized boasts broadly of the native son as "explorer, missionary, hero, civilizer of the lands of California."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2009 | Steve Chawkins
In a basement at Old Mission Santa Barbara, a filing cabinet is thick with claims of miracles that didn't make the grade. A man falls off his horse and, thanks to Junipero Serra, he gets up unscathed. A woman visits Serra's tomb in Carmel and something stirs her deeply, changing the course of her life. An alcoholic gives up drinking and credits Serra for seeing him through. They all believed their experiences to be miraculous -- but none was deemed the miracle needed to lift Serra into sainthood, a goal church officials announced 75 years ago Thursday, the 225th anniversary of his death.
NEWS
September 26, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
As spiritual pageantry blended with pilgrims' prayers, Pope John Paul II welcomed an 18th-Century Spanish friar known as "the Apostle of California" to the blessed inner circle of the Roman Catholic Church on Sunday. The Pope solemnly beatified Franciscan Father Junipero Serra, founder of the California mission system, hailing him as "a shining example of Christian virtue and the missionary spirit." To the applause of several hundred Californians among 30,000 worshipers in St.
BOOKS
June 6, 1993 | David Kipen
Father Junipero Serra's bid for canonization has been languishing in the Vatican for almost 60 years now. He remains a controversial figure in California history, but if his sponsors need any additional miracles, they could do worse than to look at his namesake library on Figueroa St. in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. While everybody else in town was boarding up their windows in anticipation of a second round of riots, the Junipero Serra branch of the L.A. Public Library (L.A.P.L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1987 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
When Father Junipero Serra died at the Carmel Mission in 1784, his reputation for saintliness was so great that guards had to be posted at his open casket to keep people from cutting locks of his hair and pieces of his Franciscan habit to use as religious relics. The physician who cared for Serra in his last hours, Dr. Juan Garcia, asked Serra's good friend and biographer, Father Francisco Palou, for a square of material from the dead priest's robe.
OPINION
November 3, 2013 | By Steven W. Hackel
Many powerful Californians have left their mark on the state. But I'd argue that the most lasting legacy, for better and for worse, belongs to a controversial man of the cloth born 300 years ago this year: Father Junipero Serra. The trail of missions he began building in 1769 would eventually stretch from San Diego to Sonoma, creating a foundation for Catholicism in California that remains solid today. But Serra's influence extended well beyond the realm of religion. More than Spanish names on a map, the missions, presidios and pueblos of Serra's day, as well as the roads between them and the resources their inhabitants organized and developed, formed the spine of what would become the nation's 31st state.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
It's a scholastic rite of passage for every California fourth-grader: studying the history of the Spanish Catholic missions and the life of Father Junípero Serra. Steven W. Hackel remembers the drill. "We were taught that Father Serra was a good, gentle padre who built missions every one-day's horseback ride apart for tired travelers, as sort of like Motel 6's of the day," says Hackel, a UC Riverside associate professor of history and author of a new biography of Serra. "And there was nothing about Indians in those missions at all. " Finding the complex man of God wrapped inside the saintly myth and putting the missing indigenous Americans back into the picture, are lead objectives of an exhibition scheduled to open Aug. 17 at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens and run through Jan. 6. PHOTOS: Junipero Serra exhibition Titled "Junípero Serra and the Legacies of the California Missions" and co-curated by Hackel and Catherine Gudis, also a UC Riverside associate professor of history, it's perhaps the most comprehensive exhibition ever assembled about the devout Franciscan friar who established nine of the 21 missions in present-day California and is sometimes called the state's "founding father.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The 21 Spanish missions stretching from San Diego to Sonoma have been emblematic of early California for centuries -- and have been the subject of reports for generations of grade schoolers. The Huntington Library announced Tuesday it will host an expansive exhibition of mission-related artifacts, featuring nearly 250 objects from 60 lenders across the United States, Mexico and Spain. "Junípero Serra and the Legacies of the California Missions," which will run Aug. 17 to Jan. 6, coincides with the 300th anniversary of Serra's birth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
For 95 years, Grant Park loomed over downtown Ventura without drawing much notice. Now, with the help of a city government willing to lease the park's 107 acres for $1 a year and a group of residents willing to raise millions for a botanical garden, it's sprung to life. On Saturday, hundreds of residents, their dogs and their kids trooped up a new mile-long trail with seed-filled Dixie cups, dumping them in spots where California bluebells, golden lupine, white yarrow, mission red monkey flowers and a host of other plants might bloom in the spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2009 | Steve Chawkins
In a basement at Old Mission Santa Barbara, a filing cabinet is thick with claims of miracles that didn't make the grade. A man falls off his horse and, thanks to Junipero Serra, he gets up unscathed. A woman visits Serra's tomb in Carmel and something stirs her deeply, changing the course of her life. An alcoholic gives up drinking and credits Serra for seeing him through. They all believed their experiences to be miraculous -- but none was deemed the miracle needed to lift Serra into sainthood, a goal church officials announced 75 years ago Thursday, the 225th anniversary of his death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2009 | Duke Helfand
The morning sun has barely crept above the horizon when 13 beginning seminarians emerge from dormitory rooms and wander into the chapel of their religious compound. "God our Father . . . let not temptation ever quench the fire that your love has kindled within us," they recite from liturgy books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The carved wooden statue of the city's patron saint, Father Junipero Serra, presides nobly over City Hall's atrium. The bronze replica stands proudly in front of City Hall, looking down California Street out to the Pacific. But where is the original 9-foot, 4-inch concrete version, from which the wood and the bronze were copied and which kept watch over Ventura for 52 years before the ravages of time and the elements began to eat away at it?
TRAVEL
September 27, 1998
The article on Molokai ("Low Rise Hawaii," Aug. 23) has nothing about Father Damien and the leper colony. The saintly Damien, thanks to Robert Louis Stevenson and others, became famous as one of the great men of Hawaiian history. Molokai without Damien is like California without Junipero Serra. MIKE MURNANE Tujunga
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2004 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
A group attempting to block a $75-million athletic and arts complex at Junipero Serra High School failed to gather enough signatures to put the issue on the ballot, clearing the way for construction to begin as early as next week. The Orange County registrar of voters' announcement Wednesday that two petitions failed to meet the threshold of 1,752 signatures ends a prolonged feud over a vacant 29-acre plot on the north side of town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2004 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
Opponents of Junipero Serra High School's plans to build athletic fields and a performing arts center in San Juan Capistrano have begun circulating petitions to force the City Council to rescind its approval of the $75-million project or put it before voters. The council approved the complex in northwest San Juan Capistrano this month over the objections of Native Americans, environmentalists and neighbors.
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