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Junk Food

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NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Disney says it's taking ads for junk food off its children's programming. The Walt Disney Co. on Tuesday announced new guidelines for TV, radio and website programming at an appearance in Washington with First Lady Michelle Obama. Critics who have for years complained about fatty, sugary food and beverage ads aimed at kids praised the move. And, they said, it's smart: As a company that positions itself as family-friendly, Disney can be seen as looking out for kids' health.
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SCIENCE
April 7, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
You know an unhealthy diet can make you fat, but new research suggests it can sap your motivation too. In a study published in the journal Physiology & Behavior, researchers at UCLA found that rats fed a diet low in fat but high in simple sugars and refined flour were not only more obese than rats that had a better diet, but also less willing to work for a reward.  MORE: Medicines and machines, inspired by nature "The obese rats...
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OPINION
February 25, 1990
If Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. would have sold junk food instead of bonds, it would still be in business today. RON LANCASTER North Hollywood
OPINION
April 6, 2014
Re "Nutritious but uneaten," April 2 The Los Angeles Unified School District serves 650,000 meals a day, with $100,000 worth of food thrown away each day by students. That adds up to $18 million wasted every year. Our society needs a renaissance of responsibility - and to resolve not to waste food. What better places to start than in homes and schools? For decades, nutritionists and educators have taught that certain foods are junk, rather than focusing on the cardinal principles of variety and moderation.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter
Are farm subsidies making us fat? Billions in taxpayer dollars are going to support high fructose corn syrup and three other common food additives used in junk food, according to a report released this week by the California Public Interest Research Group and the U.S. PIRG Education Fund, both consumer advocacy groups. The report, "Apples to Twinkies: Comparing Federal Subsidies of Fresh Produce and Junk Food," makes the case that federal farm subsidies are helping feed the nation's obesity epidemic.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By James Rainey
Mitt Romney used a speech at a Chicago fundraiser Tuesday to make a point about individual initiative and entrepreneurship. To do it, he used the example of McDonald's, the family-owned burger stand that grew into a worldwide behemoth. What could be homier and more American than enjoying a little McDonald's and the company's success story? Politicians like cozying up to fast food because, well, they might actually like it, but it also gives them a chance to show they can be just regular folk.
OPINION
May 29, 2011
If only food were as simple as cigarettes. There are no ambiguities about the evils of smoking. It sickens people who do it and endangers those around them. Despite remarkable progress in persuading people not to take up the habit in recent decades, smoking is still the No. 1 preventable cause of death in this country, and it has no known health benefits. Overeating, especially of low-nutrition junk food, is a bad habit too. Obesity is a fast-rising threat to American health. Yet, unlike with cigarettes, we can't "quit" food.
SCIENCE
August 23, 2009 | Karen Kaplan
"Sin taxes" on cigarettes have turned out to be the most effective weapon in the campaign to reduce smoking. Why not try it on Flamin' Hot Cheetos, vanilla Coke and Twinkies? With increasing vigor, public health experts and think tanks are calling for extra taxes on foods and drinks that are heavy in calories and light on nutrition. New York Gov. David Paterson proposed an 18% soda tax last year as a budget-balancing measure, only to abandon it three months later in the face of stiff public opposition.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Grabbing a burger and a doughnut may seem cheaper than downing a daily dose of fruits and vegetables, but that may not always be true, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Price depends on how you measure it, according to a new USDA report . When factored by calorie, a cookie will more often than not cost less than a red bell pepper. Most previous studies have calculated cost by measuring food energy - or the price per 100 grams divided by the number of calories present.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
Ronda Storms is a Republican state senator from Florida. She is also a mom who buys the groceries for her family of four. A few months ago, Storms, 46, started noticing that some fellow shoppers were using federal food stamp money to purchase a lot of unhealthful junk. And it galled her - at a time when Florida was cutting Medicaid reimbursement rates, public school funding and jobs - that people were indulging in sugary, fatty, highly-processed treats on the public dime. "If we're going to be cutting services across the board," she said, "then people can live without potato chips, without store-bought cookies, without their sodas.
OPINION
March 27, 2014
Re “Welcome, Professor Bieber,” Opinion, March 25 Fortunately (or unfortunately) we live in a time and place of almost unlimited choices as to what we ingest in both mind and body. We have access to junk food and healthful food, Internet garbage and Internet gems, TV treasures and TV trash. “Reality” and “entertainment” shows fuel our fascination with stardom and almost anyone who is in the public eye. Our obsession with fame has no doubt contributed to the rise in narcissism (think Lance Armstrong and Lindsey Lohan)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
Public health officials Wednesday called a new survey that found 70% of stores in Los Angeles County market tobacco, alcohol and junk food to consumers troubling, especially given that many neighborhoods lack alternatives to make healthier choices. Meanwhile, just 12% of stores have exterior advertising for healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, researchers found. The statewide survey looked at the availability and marketing of tobacco products, alcohol and food in retail environments of more than 7,300 California stores.
OPINION
February 21, 2014
Re "Produce trucks feed a need," Column One, Feb. 19 Produce trucks traversing neighborhoods, providing fresh produce and other items: great idea. But readers should know that bringing food to neighborhoods was once common in Los Angeles. I lived in the Los Feliz district, and these trucks went all over the city. Before supermarkets and big-box stores, trucks had regular neighborhood routes and brought a variety of food. There must be some folks who recall deliveries of dairy items from Adohr Farms and bread and sweets from Helms Bakery.
OPINION
January 6, 2014 | By Deborah Cohen
At this time of year, a lot of Americans have vowed to develop more healthful habits. Unfortunately, most of those who have made weight loss resolutions will fail. But it won't be entirely their fault. Americans today live in a food swamp. We are constantly exposed to marketing and advertising designed to keep food on our minds and treats at our fingertips. If you go out to dinner, you will probably be served more food than you need and eat more than you should. At the market, you'll be encouraged to buy unhealthful foods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
The savory smell of nutmeg and cinnamon wafts through the Azusa bakery, where dozens of workers in blue gloves and hairnets cook up L.A. Unified's newest star product. The "Glorious Morning" muffin is chewy and moist, packed with whole wheat, raisins and carrots - along with flaxseed for heart health and brain development. The muffin is good for children but also for the bakery's business. The Los Angeles Unified School District's order with Buena Vista Food Products Inc. to bake 4 million servings of muffins, coffeecake and corn bread every month has doubled the firm's business and created 100 jobs this year.
WORLD
November 1, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Hardly had the ink dried on President Enrique Peña Nieto's contentious $14-billion tax plan when big business - especially the powerful maquiladora industry on Mexico's border with the U.S. - raised a loud voice of protest, vowing to fight a package that opponents say will cripple industry. Major business groups, after weeks of unsuccessful lobbying, said Friday they would mount legal challenges to block the plan, which won final congressional approval Thursday and would raise taxes on border enterprises including the thriving maquiladoras, as the export-centered assembly plants near the border are known.
OPINION
September 20, 2005
The governor has signed a ban on junk food in schools (Sept. 16) -- well done! During the several years I worked with the L.A. County nutrition task force, we were never able to come close to that. It will be a boon for education and a boost for test scores when corpulent kids no longer sit stupefied at their desks, their brains addled by the toxic concoctions pushed by the processed-foods industry. RICHARD P. HUEMER MD Palmdale
NEWS
September 3, 2010
For many students, “back to school” means back to a vending machine diet. As you might guess, this isn’t necessarily a good thing for student health. Vending machines are found in 16% of U.S. elementary schools, 52% of middle schools and 88% of high schools. About 22% of students in grades 1 through 12 buy food in vending machines each day – and those purchases added an average of 253 calories to their diets, according to a new study in the September issue of the Journal of School Health.
WORLD
October 18, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - It may soon cost more to get fat in Mexico. New taxes on high-calorie foods and sugary drinks were approved by Mexico's lower house of Congress in a marathon 18-hour session that ended Friday, and are likely to become law. They are part of a broader package of taxes and other fiscal changes proposed by President Enrique Peña Nieto aimed at generating nearly $20 billion for the national treasury. Mexico has one of the world's highest rates of obesity, recently surpassing the United States, and health experts applauded higher prices for chips, candy and other chatarra , or junk food.
WORLD
October 18, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - It may soon cost more to get fat in Mexico. New taxes on high-calorie junk food and sugary drinks were approved by Mexico's lower house of Congress in a marathon 18-hour session that ended Friday morning. They are part of a broader package of taxes and other fiscal changes proposed by President Enrique Peña Nieto aimed at generating nearly $20 billion for the national treasury. Mexico has one of the world's highest rates of obesity, recently surpassing the United States, and bigger price tags on chips, candy and other chatarra - or junk food - are being applauded by health experts.
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