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Junk Food

WORLD
October 18, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - It may soon cost more to get fat in Mexico. New taxes on high-calorie junk food and sugary drinks were approved by Mexico's lower house of Congress in a marathon 18-hour session that ended Friday morning. They are part of a broader package of taxes and other fiscal changes proposed by President Enrique Peña Nieto aimed at generating nearly $20 billion for the national treasury. Mexico has one of the world's highest rates of obesity, recently surpassing the United States, and bigger price tags on chips, candy and other chatarra - or junk food - are being applauded by health experts.
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OPINION
September 20, 2005
The governor has signed a ban on junk food in schools (Sept. 16) -- well done! During the several years I worked with the L.A. County nutrition task force, we were never able to come close to that. It will be a boon for education and a boost for test scores when corpulent kids no longer sit stupefied at their desks, their brains addled by the toxic concoctions pushed by the processed-foods industry. RICHARD P. HUEMER MD Palmdale
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2008
I was delighted to see a feature on Josh Brolin's career advances and upcoming films ["Taking a Run at President," by Robert Abele, Oct. 12]. I am eagerly anticipating both "W." and "Milk." However, I was dismayed to see that the writer fell into the long-established trap of misrepresenting Dan White's attorneys' strategy as "the Twinkie defense," as it is nothing more than an urban legend. The fact is that the Twinkie defense was coined by the media and used by the public to express their anger and disbelief that White could be acquitted of the crime he so obviously and purposely committed.
NEWS
September 3, 2010
For many students, “back to school” means back to a vending machine diet. As you might guess, this isn’t necessarily a good thing for student health. Vending machines are found in 16% of U.S. elementary schools, 52% of middle schools and 88% of high schools. About 22% of students in grades 1 through 12 buy food in vending machines each day – and those purchases added an average of 253 calories to their diets, according to a new study in the September issue of the Journal of School Health.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2012 | By Joe Flint
In written testimony to Congress, Dish Network Chairman Charlie Ergen said the satellite broacaster's controversial new commercial-skipping feature will help protect children from the marketing efforts of the fast food and alcohol industries. Called the "AutoHop," the feature on Dish's digitial video recorders allows its subscribers to avoid commercials on recorded shows from broadcast networks ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox. Although consumers can already fast-forward through commercials on recorded shows, the AutoHop has caused concerns for the networks because it goes a step further.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Think your kid isn't tempted by junk food while at school? A study finds that about half of kids surveyed from public and private school had ready access to vending machines, snack bars, school stores and a la carte lines. And they're not just selling carrot sticks. The study, released Monday in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine , looked at the foods children had access to at various spots on campus during lunch time, in what they termed "competitive venues. " Researchers surveyed children at 2,647 public elementary schools and 1,205 public elementary schools from 2006 to 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2001
Senate Bill 19, introduced by Sen. Martha Escutia, D-Whittier, would limit the fat and sugar content in food served at schools. Student journalist Samantha MacLaren spoke to JOEL WARD, activities director at Lakewood High School in Long Beach. SB 19 is a good idea; it just has bad parts to it. And one of the bad parts is that it takes away authority that student associations have to sell food and beverage items.
FOOD
March 26, 1992 | CAROLE SUGARMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST
At my Washington supermarket recently, 10 Twinkies cost $2.89 and 10 oranges were $1.99. You would have saved 90 cents, 1,000 calories and 60 grams of fat if you made oranges rather than Twinkies your afternoon snack. On the other hand, a serving of crinkle-cut French fries cost 10 cents last week, while an Idaho potato was about 25 cents. In this case, you would have saved money but certainly not fat if you went the French-fry route. What price junk food?
NATIONAL
July 19, 2012 | By Tina Susman
Just as New Yorkers are adjusting to the idea of doing without super-sized sugary sodas, those on the hunt for fattening food and drink could be facing another hurdle. Shoppers in some markets will have to walk past -- gasp -- apples, bananas and other healthful items before they reach the junk. It's all part of Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg's drive to combat obesity in New York City, a fight that has the backing of many health and nutrition experts but is a thorn in the zaftig sides of people who say they should be able to eat and drink what they want.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2012 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
Ronda Storms is a Republican state senator from Florida. She is also a mom who buys the groceries for her family of four. A few months ago, Storms, 46, started noticing that some fellow shoppers were using federal food stamp money to purchase a lot of unhealthful junk. And it galled her - at a time when Florida was cutting Medicaid reimbursement rates, public school funding and jobs - that people were indulging in sugary, fatty, highly-processed treats on the public dime. "If we're going to be cutting services across the board," she said, "then people can live without potato chips, without store-bought cookies, without their sodas.
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