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Junot Diaz

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July 25, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Rap Genius is a deceptively simple idea started by three friends from Yale: a website where users could make their own pop-up annotations to the lyrics of their favorite rap songs, with the most popular crowd-sourced explanations rising to the top. For example, when Kendrick Lamar says " Poetic justice, put it in a song " he's referring to the 1993 film "Poetic Justice" with rapper Tupac Shakur and Janet Jackson (who's sampled on the track),...
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Kelly Clarkson is currently out $235,000, is not able to take possession of the Jane Austen ring she bought last year, and faces British Austen fans who want to buy the ring back. Clarkson, an avowed Austen fan who has also purchased a first edition of the author's novel "Persuasion," set off a battle with her purchase at auction of Austen's gold and turquoise ring . The British government stepped in, declaring the object a national treasure and placing a temporary export ban on the item on Aug. 1, meaning it can't leave the country.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Stephen Colbert had author Junot Diaz on his show Monday night to talk about immigration. He introduced Diaz by saying, "My guest tonight won a Nobel Prize and a MacArthur Genius grant. " Sure, Diaz has been racking up awards like nobody's business. He got his MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship in 2012. Last week he won the British Sunday Times EFG Private Bank short story prize -- worth more than $45,000 for a single short story -- with "Miss Lora," one of the stories in his latest collection, "This Is How You Lose Her. "  But he doesn't have a Nobel Prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
In a wide-ranging interview (in Spanish) with the Mexico City literary magazine Letras Libres, Junot Díaz talks candidly about his relationship with women, and discusses his plans for “Yunior,” the alter ego who appears in two of his story collections, “Drown,” and last year's “This Is How You Lose Her.” (The latter comes out in paperback next month, while a deluxe slipcased edition illustrated by "Love and Rockets" co-creator Jaime...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
In a wide-ranging interview (in Spanish) with the Mexico City literary magazine Letras Libres, Junot Díaz talks candidly about his relationship with women, and discusses his plans for “Yunior,” the alter ego who appears in two of his story collections, “Drown,” and last year's “This Is How You Lose Her.” (The latter comes out in paperback next month, while a deluxe slipcased edition illustrated by "Love and Rockets" co-creator Jaime...
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been corrected. See note below.
The National Book Foundation announced the finalists for the National Book Awards on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" show Wednesday. Junot Diaz, who was recently named a MacArthur “Genius” Fellow, is among the fiction finalists for his short-story collection, “This Is How You Lose Her.” Two other fiction finalists -- Ben Fountain's “Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk” and “The Yellow Birds” by Kevin Powers -- deal with America's long military...
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
On Monday, news of who would be named the 2012 MacArthur Fellows leaked out early in reports by the Associated Press and elsewhere. Two writers are among the 23 artists, scientists and thinkers on the list: Junot Diaz and Dinaw Mengestu. Diaz is the author of, most recently, the short story collection "This Is How You Lose Her," published in September. Mengestu's most recent work is the 2010 novel "How to Read the Air. " Both are published by Riverhead. Each author will receive a no-strings-attached "genius grant" of $500,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
New York's 92nd Street Y will webcast a conversation with Junot Diaz live on Monday at 5 p.m. Pacific (8 p.m. Eastern). Diaz was in Los Angeles in September to read from his short story collection "This Is How You Lose Her. " The book has spent 10 weeks on the L.A. Times bestseller list. The Times' Hector Tobar praised the book in his review : "Reading the stories in Díaz's new collection, 'This Is How You Lose Her,' is often a three-dimensional, laugh-out-loud experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Dominican American writer Junot Diaz is on the shortlist for the Sunday Times EFG Private Bank short story award. The British prize is said to be the world's largest for a single short story: The winner will receive more than $45,000. It's Diaz's story " Miss Lora " that made the list. The story is in his 2012 collection "This Is How You Lose Her. " There are five other authors in contention for the prize: Sarah Hall, Toby Litt, Ali Smith, Mark Haddon, and Cynan Jones. Smith is Scottish, Jones was born in Wales and the others are English.
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | MERI NANA-AMA DANQUAH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the age of 7 when Junot Diaz immigrated to America, he resisted speaking English because he did not like it. Twenty years later, with "Drown" (Riverhead, 1996), his collection of short stories, he has become the first Dominican American male to publish fiction in the very language he initially refused to utter. Already, he is being touted as a literary sensation. Newsweek selected him as one of its noteworthy young "New Faces of 1996."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Near the end of Reza Aslan's strange, 10-minute television exchange with Fox News, the author of "Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth," gives voice to a thought that's entered the mind of many an author while being interviewed: “I'm afraid it seems like you haven't read my book.” The interview, now circulating widely on social media sites, has helped propel the book to No. 1 on the Amazon bestseller list Monday. Aslan is a Muslim scholar of religion and a one-time Christian convert who's just published a popular book about the life of Jesus.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Rap Genius is a deceptively simple idea started by three friends from Yale: a website where users could make their own pop-up annotations to the lyrics of their favorite rap songs, with the most popular crowd-sourced explanations rising to the top. For example, when Kendrick Lamar says " Poetic justice, put it in a song " he's referring to the 1993 film "Poetic Justice" with rapper Tupac Shakur and Janet Jackson (who's sampled on the track),...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat is back -- despite dying in 1988 at age 27. On the first day it was open, more than 4,000 people turned out to see a show of his work at Gagosian Gallery in New York in February. His notebooks will be exhibited at Paris' Musee D'Art Moderne next year. And in January, Sotheby's auctioned some of his paintings; the one above, "Untitled (Pecho/Oreja)," sold for $10.6 million. And now a Basquiat book is being planned by former girlfriend Alexis Adler, who is now a biologist, that will feature a trove of materials she has held onto for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Stephen Colbert had author Junot Diaz on his show Monday night to talk about immigration. He introduced Diaz by saying, "My guest tonight won a Nobel Prize and a MacArthur Genius grant. " Sure, Diaz has been racking up awards like nobody's business. He got his MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship in 2012. Last week he won the British Sunday Times EFG Private Bank short story prize -- worth more than $45,000 for a single short story -- with "Miss Lora," one of the stories in his latest collection, "This Is How You Lose Her. "  But he doesn't have a Nobel Prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
First-time novelist Ben Fountain won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction Thursday for “Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk,” a darkly comic send-up of the emotional and cultural aftermath of the Iraq War. The awards were announced in a ceremony in New York. Roberto Caro won the biography award for “The Passage of Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson,” the fourth installment in Caro's magisterial biography of the thirty-sixth president. The winner in the nonfiction category was Andrew Solomon, for “Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity,” a book which the critics' citation described as “a groundbreaking look at family relationships with children who are radically different from their parents' expectations in physical, mental, and behavioral ways.” Other winners included, in poetry, D.A. Powell for “Useless Landscape, or A Guide for Boys," and in criticism, Marina Warner for "Stranger Magic: Charmed States and the Arabian Nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Since 2010, the New York- and Venezuela-based Fundación Cisernos has published a series of critically acclaimed books in which several of Latin America's most renowned modern artists speak.   They're gorgeous, thoughtful books, in which creators such as the Argentine-born artist and industrial designer Tomás Maldonado speak at length and freely about the birth of their vision and their careers, often accompanied by illustrations of their work. Now, the Fundación Cisneros/Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros is making six of these works available for the first time in e-book format.
BOOKS
September 1, 1996 | RICHARD EDER
The empire always strikes back. Cromwell subjugated Ireland 350 years ago; today the British wrestle intractably with the Irish problem and an occasional bomb blast. The French exercised their power and culture in North Africa and prospered; today France's politics and urban urbanity are strained by millions of North African immigrants and also an occasional bomb.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
A book for children about the Sandy Hook shootings? Random House announced Monday that it will be publishing one this fall. And with an award-winning writer and illustrator at the helm, it just might work. Patricia MacLachlan, who will be writing the story, is best known for her children's book "Sally, Plain and Tall," which won the 1986 Newbery Medal. The art will be done by Steven Kellogg , who has written and/or illustrated about 100 books for children, garnering the New England Book Award and the Regina Medal for distringuished contribution to children's literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Dominican American writer Junot Diaz is on the shortlist for the Sunday Times EFG Private Bank short story award. The British prize is said to be the world's largest for a single short story: The winner will receive more than $45,000. It's Diaz's story " Miss Lora " that made the list. The story is in his 2012 collection "This Is How You Lose Her. " There are five other authors in contention for the prize: Sarah Hall, Toby Litt, Ali Smith, Mark Haddon, and Cynan Jones. Smith is Scottish, Jones was born in Wales and the others are English.
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