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December 3, 1987 | Associated Press
Presidential candidate Sylvio Claude today called for a nationwide strike until the military-dominated junta resigns, and a Roman Catholic priest was quoted as endorsing a revolution to oust the government. "We are calling for a strike for Friday to continue until the departure of the junta," Claude told reporters.
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WORLD
March 25, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Andres D'Alessandro
Los Angeles Times BUENOS AIRES - Mercedes Alvarez is among the many here who will never believe that Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the Argentine chosen to be pope, did anything unsavory during the dark days of this country's "dirty war. " She is aware of the allegations against him. And she has written them off as political gamesmanship. "What's happening," the homemaker said the day before Pope Francis was inaugurated in Rome last week, "is that our president had been fighting with him, and she is trying to hurt his reputation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2009 | Andres D'Alessandro and Chris Kraul
Former Argentine President Raul Alfonsin, who was given credit for restoring democracy to his country after years of coups, dictators and "dirty war," died of lung cancer Tuesday at his home in Buenos Aires. He was 82. A human rights attorney before entering politics, Alfonsin took a courageous stand by criticizing the junta that ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1983. In the so-called dirty war against dissidents, military officers ordered the torture and murder of thousands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2012 | By Lisa Girion, Los Angeles Times
Burmese expatriates in Southern California love to talk about their homeland - its natural beauty, its people, its history. But, even after they leave Myanmar, many fear talking about the politics of the country also known as Burma. The election to parliament Sunday of Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi may begin to change that, some said. The election that resulted in a claimed victory for Suu Kyi and at least 10 other members of her party, the National League for Democracy, was the ruling junta's latest step to try to persuade the international community to ease crippling economic sanctions imposed in protest of the military's brutal grip on the Southeast Asian country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2009 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nikolaos Makarezos, 90, one of the leaders of the military dictatorship that ruled Greece from 1967 to 1974, died Monday, Greek media reported. Makarezos, the junta's chief economic policymaker, served as deputy prime minister and minister for coordination under dictator George Papadopoulos. Makarezos was arrested after the fall of the right-wing dictatorship in 1974 and sentenced to death for treason -- a sentence later commuted to life imprisonment. He was released in 1990 because of poor health.
WORLD
August 12, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Mauritania's ousted prime minister was freed from house arrest and defiantly refused to recognize the African country's ruling military junta. Prime Minister Yahya Ould Ahmed Waghef told a rally of several thousand people that the country would not accept last week's bloodless coup that forced President Sidi Ould Cheikh Abdallahi from power. Abdallahi remains under arrest. Waghef said the president was in good health and encouraged the crowd to keep pushing to restore the government to power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989
A mystifying phenomenon of our national scene is the continuing prominence of Jeane Kirkpatrick as a foreign policy guru despite her demonstrated deficiencies of experience and judgment. What entitles a person who has never served outside the U.S. to pontificate about the incredibly sensitive situation in the Middle East ("Baker's Inappropriate Role As an Evenhanded Broker," Op-Ed Page, May 28)? Let's face it: This academic Amazon has long been the darling of an influential sector of the far right.
NEWS
April 23, 1986 | Associated Press
Col. Moammar Kadafi is no longer in sole charge of Libya but is a member of a five-man junta of military officers governing the country after last week's U.S. air raids, the London Times reported today. The report by Robert Fisk from Tripoli said, "Col. Kadafi now performs the tasks of a figurehead rather than the sole political and military leader." Fisk said the four other members of the junta are Kadafi's deputy, Maj.
BOOKS
August 23, 1987 | Carolyn Meyer, Meyer writes the Young Adult Book column for Saturday View.
The charming Greek fishing village near Delphi that author Edward Fenton brings to life in "The Morning of the Gods" is not, he insists, the same charming Greek fishing village in which he lives. Nevertheless, he obviously knows and loves his subject deeply, and from that knowledge and affection he creates a striking group portrait. Carla arrives in the village after her Greek-born mother died in an accident.
OPINION
March 22, 2010
The Obama administration's strategy of engaging with rogue regimes may have paid off in a small way in Myanmar. The release from prison of a pro-democracy activist doesn't signal that democracy is coming to that oppressed nation, but it does argue for continued contact to keep pressing for desperately needed change. Naturalized American citizen Nyi Nyi Aung was arrested on spurious charges, sentenced after an unfair trial and mistreated in prison, according to Human Rights Watch.
WORLD
November 5, 2010 | By a Times Staff Writer
At the Nandawun market on the outskirts of Yangon, independent candidate Kaung Myint Htut and a dozen campaign workers in T-shirts distribute photocopied pamphlets. The ragged band moves about in a pair of battered, 2-decade-old jeeps that list and belch smoke, dented speakers on the roofs playing popular nationalist tunes. Most onlookers appear bemused. Several times in a 90-minute period Thursday, the motley contingent passed entourages from the main pro-government Union Solidarity and Development Party.
WORLD
June 9, 2010 | By Andres D’Alessandro and Chris Kraul, Special to the Los Angeles Times
They were adopted by a wealthy media family at the height of Argentina's so-called dirty war. Now the two 34-year-olds find themselves, much against their will, at the center of a national obsession as their country awaits the results of court-ordered DNA tests. The question: Are they among the 400 children of victims of the military dictatorship who still remain unaccounted for? The intense emotions surrounding the case show that Argentina is still struggling to recover from the trauma of the internal conflict from 1976 to 1983, when 10,000 to 30,000 people disappeared and are presumed to have been killed by the military junta.
OPINION
March 22, 2010
The Obama administration's strategy of engaging with rogue regimes may have paid off in a small way in Myanmar. The release from prison of a pro-democracy activist doesn't signal that democracy is coming to that oppressed nation, but it does argue for continued contact to keep pressing for desperately needed change. Naturalized American citizen Nyi Nyi Aung was arrested on spurious charges, sentenced after an unfair trial and mistreated in prison, according to Human Rights Watch.
WORLD
November 5, 2009 | Charles McDermid
Senior U.S. officials were allowed to meet today with Aung San Suu Kyi, the leader of Myanmar's pro-democracy movement, in a further sign of thawing relations between Washington and the Asian nation's secretive military government. A high-ranking group led by Assistant Secretary of State Kurt Campbell, the top American diplomat for East Asia, met privately with the Nobel Peace Prize winner for two hours at a hotel in Yangon, the former capital, according to local media reports.
WORLD
August 31, 2009 | Mark Magnier
An uneasy calm settled over northern Myanmar today as Kokang fighters and refugees continued to cross the border into southern China in the wake of a military operation in the northern part of the country also known as Burma. U.N. and overseas Myanmar groups say upward of 10,000 refugees and hundreds of Kokang fighters are now in southern China, presenting a logistical headache for Beijing. Still unclear, analysts said, is whether this is only a lull in the fighting and how great an effect this human tide will have on Sino-Myanmar relations.
OPINION
August 31, 2009 | Robert White and Glenn Hurowitz, Robert White, former political section chief at the U.S. Embassy in Honduras and ambassador to El Salvador and Paraguay, is president of the Center for International Policy. Glenn Hurowitz, a senior fellow at the center, is the author of "Fear and Courage in the Democratic Party."
When Honduran soldiers entered democratically elected President Manuel Zelaya's bedroom and packed him off in his pajamas at gunpoint to exile this summer, the politicians and industrialists who backed the ouster had confidence that President Obama wouldn't touch them. Even though the United States maintains 600 troops in Honduras, they thought they could pull off the first successful military coup in Latin America since the end of the Cold War. So far, they're right: The Honduran junta's intransigence in negotiations to restore democracy has been rewarded with U.S. complacency, setting an extremely dangerous precedent for other areas of the world.
NEWS
July 25, 1987 | Associated Press
Eleven people were killed Friday in two towns during anti-government demonstrations demanding the resignation of the provisional junta, the official government television reported. Radio Haiti Inter, however, reported that the fighting was between members of the Tontons Macoutes, a disbanded special police force, and a rival peasant group. The radio also reported that the death toll may be higher than that reported by the government.
OPINION
May 14, 2002 | KAVITA MENON
When the military government in Myanmar announced the release from house arrest of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, an official statement made a tantalizing promise: "We shall recommit ourselves to allowing all of our citizens to participate freely in the life of our political process." What could the generals in charge possibly mean?
WORLD
August 16, 2009 | Charles McDermid, McDermid is a special correspondent.
Virginia Sen. Jim Webb has gained the release of an American prisoner on the fast-moving first day of a trip to Myanmar in which Webb held face-to-face talks with reclusive junta leader Senior Gen. Than Shwe and also a rare meeting with jailed pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Webb's two-day trip comes just days after a military court ruled Suu Kyi was guilty of violating the terms of her house arrest by harboring the uninvited American John...
WORLD
August 11, 2009 | Associated Press
A Myanmar court convicted pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi today of violating her house arrest, but the head of the military-ruled country said that she could serve a 1 1/2-year sentence under house arrest. The court initially sentenced Suu Kyi to three years in prison. But after a five-minute recess, the country's home minister entered the courtroom and read aloud a special order from junta chief Than Shwe. The order said that Than Shwe was cutting the sentence in half to 1 1/2 years and that it could be served under house arrest.
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