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September 25, 2011 | By Diane K. Fisher
The ancient Romans made up stories about gods and goddesses. These stories are called myths. According to one ancient Roman myth, Jupiter was the top god. He had two brothers and three sisters. The three boys got to divide up the world, with Jupiter getting the sky, Neptune getting the ocean and Pluto getting the underworld. Jupiter was powerful, and he really liked to throw his weight around. He hurled lightning bolts, created booming thunder and cloudbursts of rain, and generally made the other gods nervous.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
"The Matrix" creators Andy and Lana Wachowski have a new chosen one: Mila Kunis, star of the upcoming sci-fi spectacle "Jupiter Ascending. " The latest trailer for the movie, which you can watch above, introduces Kunis' character, Jupiter Jones, who like Keanu Reeves' Neo in "The Matrix" trilogy is an ordinary person who gets caught up in a battle for the fate of humanity. Though Jupiter toils her days away cleaning other people's houses, her genetic signature in fact marks her as intergalactic royalty.
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SCIENCE
November 19, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
An international team of astrophysicists has discovered an enormous gaseous planet that is 13 times more massive than Jupiter, earning it the designation "super-Jupiter. " The finding, which is set to be published in an upcoming issue of the journal Astrophysical Journal Letters, marks the first new exoplanet system to be directly observed in over four years, according to the researchers. A pre-print of the study is available here . The planet is named "Kappa And b," because it is revolving around the parent star Kappa Andromedae.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2013 | By Amina Khan, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Jupiter's icy moon Europa squirts water like a squishy bath toy when it's squeezed by the gas giant's gravity, scientists say. Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, they caught two 124-mile-tall geysers of water vapor spewing out over seven hours from near its south pole. The discovery, described in the journal Science and at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco, shows that Europa is still geophysically active - and that this world in our own solar system could hold an environment friendly to life.
SCIENCE
September 15, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Jupiter is back. After hiding in the glare of the sun for much of the summer, the gas giant is highly visible once again, and you can get a closer look at it online, live, right here. On Sunday evening, beginning at 10:30 p.m. PDT, the team at the online astronomy site Slooh.com will turn their telescope on Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system, and stream the results for the world to see. You can watch the show live in the video box above. Over the course of the broadcast viewers should get to see Jupiter's four  largest moons -- Ganymede, Europa, Io and Callisto -- and watch them slowly dance around the planet.
SCIENCE
August 30, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Looking for a Labor Day sky-watching plan? Keep your eye out for Jupiter.  The giant gaseous planet will be the second-brightest body in the sky, after the moon, this weekend, and you won't be able to miss it, according to EarthSky.org. The bummer for late-night partiers is that the best view of the planet will be early in the morning, some time around dawn. But early risers will have a front-row seat to the show. At 6 a.m. on Saturday morning, look low in the sky to the East to find Jupiter right next to a thin crescent moon.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Laura E. Davis
Scientists may have figured out why Jupiter's Great Red Spot -- the massive storm that's two to three times the size of Earth -- has stuck around for so long, and the finding may give us more insight into similar vortices on Earth and the formation of stars and planets. The Red Spot has been around for centuries, and scientists didn't know why. Their theories led them to believe the vortex should have disappeared after decades, not stuck around for hundreds of years. So Pedram Hassanzadeh, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard, and Philip Marcus, a professor of fluid dynamics at UC Berkeley, decided to try to figure out why the Red Spot had endured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2011 | By Scott Gold, Los Angeles Times
NASA's spacecraft Juno lifted off Friday in an incandescent arc over the Atlantic Ocean, the start of a five-year, 1.7-billion mile trip to Jupiter that scientists believe will unlock some of the secrets behind the origin of the solar system. NASA's spacecraft Juno lifted off Friday in an incandescent arc over the Atlantic Ocean, the start of a five-year, 1.7-billion mile trip to Jupiter that scientists believe will unlock some of the secrets behind the origin of the solar system.
SCIENCE
May 27, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
As you head home from the barbecue or the beach Monday evening, take a moment for a little planet gazing. Jupiter, Mercury and Venus form a close triangle in the night sky Monday, and they shine brightly enough that even light pollution from a city like Los Angeles won't get in the way of their visibility. To find the planetary trio, wait 45 minutes after the sun has set. You will need an unobstructed view of the Western night sky. Look for the planets low in the sky, just above where the sun has set. You can find a map of where the planets will be in the sky here . PHOTOS: Awesome images from space Jupiter and Venus will be shining brightly, respectively making up the left- and right-hand points of the base of this planetary triangle.
SPORTS
May 14, 1989
Jack Grout, 78, Jack Nicklaus' first and only golf teacher, died of cancer at his home in Jupiter, Fla.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Laura E. Davis
Scientists may have figured out why Jupiter's Great Red Spot -- the massive storm that's two to three times the size of Earth -- has stuck around for so long, and the finding may give us more insight into similar vortices on Earth and the formation of stars and planets. The Red Spot has been around for centuries, and scientists didn't know why. Their theories led them to believe the vortex should have disappeared after decades, not stuck around for hundreds of years. So Pedram Hassanzadeh, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard, and Philip Marcus, a professor of fluid dynamics at UC Berkeley, decided to try to figure out why the Red Spot had endured.
SCIENCE
October 10, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Diamonds are forever, unless you're on Saturn or Jupiter. Loads of the super-hard precious stones may be floating among the gas giants' fluid layers and melted into liquid further into their depths, say a pair of planetary scientists. The research, being presented at the Division for Planetary Sciences conference this week in Denver, sprang from very humble beginnings - soot in Saturn's atmosphere, said Kevin Baines, a planetary scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and one of the work's coauthors.
SCIENCE
September 15, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Jupiter is back. After hiding in the glare of the sun for much of the summer, the gas giant is highly visible once again, and you can get a closer look at it online, live, right here. On Sunday evening, beginning at 10:30 p.m. PDT, the team at the online astronomy site Slooh.com will turn their telescope on Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system, and stream the results for the world to see. You can watch the show live in the video box above. Over the course of the broadcast viewers should get to see Jupiter's four  largest moons -- Ganymede, Europa, Io and Callisto -- and watch them slowly dance around the planet.
SCIENCE
August 30, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Looking for a Labor Day sky-watching plan? Keep your eye out for Jupiter.  The giant gaseous planet will be the second-brightest body in the sky, after the moon, this weekend, and you won't be able to miss it, according to EarthSky.org. The bummer for late-night partiers is that the best view of the planet will be early in the morning, some time around dawn. But early risers will have a front-row seat to the show. At 6 a.m. on Saturday morning, look low in the sky to the East to find Jupiter right next to a thin crescent moon.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Europa Report" is a Grade A version of a B picture, a streamlined science fiction story that smartly tells a familiar tale without breaking the bank. Though modern moviemaking often mandates that science fiction be synonymous with multimillion-dollar expenditures, director Sebastian Cordero and a crack team including cinematographer Enrique Chediak and production designer Eugenio Caballero (who won an Oscar for Guillermo del Toro's "Pan's Labyrinth") have crafted a visually sophisticated film that elegantly involves audiences on a budget of less than $10 million.
SCIENCE
July 18, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
In the latest development in an ongoing dispute between Congress and the Obama administration, the House Appropriations Committee has passed a funding package that restores some funding to the planetary science budget, including money to help pay for the next rover mission to Mars and exploration of Jupiter's moon Europa. The new Commerce, Justice and Science appropriations package includes $1.315 billion for planetary science in NASA's budget, close to $100 million more than the $1.217 billion the Obama administration had requested.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1995
Venus and Jupiter are brilliant low in the southwest during evening twilight. Look for them about 5:30 p.m. Venus is 10 times brighter than Jupiter, and the two are separated by 13 degrees--a distance that is decreasing daily. Much fainter Mars is midway between then. Source: John Mosley, Griffith Observatory
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1994
Although not of the same cosmic significance as the Simpson trial, the comet that collided into Jupiter had to be the story of the week ("Jupiter Takes Huge Blow From Comet," July 19). Especially interesting--although, again, not quite as interesting as the O.J. Simpson trial--was the fact that one comet fragment created a plume with a width (9,600 miles) greater than the diameter of the Earth; I found this to be a precautionary item worth noting. Because, I feel, it would be particularly unpleasant to live through such a plume, I propose we not procrastinate, but immediately begin construction of three large baseball gloves to orbit above the Earth; attached to each glove would be a long rope for hauling, which would allow for easy fielding by a NASA Shuttle craft.
SCIENCE
May 27, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
As you head home from the barbecue or the beach Monday evening, take a moment for a little planet gazing. Jupiter, Mercury and Venus form a close triangle in the night sky Monday, and they shine brightly enough that even light pollution from a city like Los Angeles won't get in the way of their visibility. To find the planetary trio, wait 45 minutes after the sun has set. You will need an unobstructed view of the Western night sky. Look for the planets low in the sky, just above where the sun has set. You can find a map of where the planets will be in the sky here . PHOTOS: Awesome images from space Jupiter and Venus will be shining brightly, respectively making up the left- and right-hand points of the base of this planetary triangle.
SCIENCE
May 11, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
There will be no meteor showers this weekend, or ring-of-fire solar eclipses, but if you head outside around twilight, you'll get an excellent view of Jupiter and Venus around a slender crescent moon. As night begins to fall on Saturday and Sunday evenings, look to the sky to find Jupiter in the same vicinity as the new moon. Then look below the moon to find Venus. The planets will look like white points of light, not so different than stars, but they will be bright enough to be visible even in a light-polluted city like Los Angeles without the aid of a telescope.
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