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December 13, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA plans to dispatch a hulking nuclear-powered spacecraft to determine whether three of Jupiter's icy, planet-sized moons have the potential to harbor life. The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, or JIMO, would spend monthlong stints circling the moons Callisto, Europa and Ganymede, which are believed to have vast oceans tucked beneath thick covers of ice.
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SCIENCE
May 19, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The Milky Way galaxy may be filled with millions upon millions of Jupiter-sized planets that have escaped their solar systems and are wandering freely in space, researchers said Wednesday in a finding that seems certain to make astronomers rethink their ideas about planetary formation. Scientists had previously thought that about 20% of stars had massive planets attached to them, but the new results reported in the journal Nature suggest that there are at least twice as many planets as stars, and perhaps several times as many.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1997 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
It's raining on Jupiter, according to the latest results from the Galileo spacecraft. Although the probe that plunged into the giant planet's atmosphere two years ago found no trace of water, researchers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena are now convinced that the miniature weather station merely hit a patch of unusually clear, dry weather--the Death Valley of Jupiter.
SCIENCE
November 19, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Astronomers have discovered an unusual planet that challenges several widely held assumptions about the way solar systems work. The planet, about 2,000 light-years away from us, is orbiting an unlikely star at an unlikely distance. The find, reported Thursday in the online edition of the journal Science, also indicates that planets may be more common outside our own Milky Way galaxy than had been thought. When astronomer Rainer Klement of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany, began observing the planet, his expectations were low. "To be honest, it started as kind of a fun project," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Galileo spacecraft will pass one of the most critical milestones on its long journey to Jupiter late tonight when it loops around Venus and uses that planet's gravity to fling itself back toward Earth. The sophisticated robot will make a series of observations as it passes 10,000 miles above the dense clouds of Venus. But scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena will have to wait until October to find out what Galileo learned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2000 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A spacecraft that was supposed to die a natural death in 1997 is now being joined near Jupiter by a newer craft, unexpectedly giving scientists the chance to "double team" the giant gas planet, officials at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena said Saturday.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
After almost 20 years of nail-biting, a half-dozen pale Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientists finally realized their dream Thursday: Their intrepid Galileo spacecraft successfully delivered its long-awaited one-two punch to Jupiter, jabbing the giant planet's midsection with a precisely parachuted probe and then powering its mother ship into Jovian orbit. At precisely 3:10 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1998
The Galileo spacecraft has produced new evidence showing there may be liquid oceans beneath the icy crusts of two of Jupiter's moons, raising the possibility of life beyond Earth. Scientists said the spacecraft that has been orbiting Jupiter since 1995 has picked up data showing Europa and Callisto, two of the planet's moons, perturb its magnetic fields.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
Galileo's camera shutter snapped uncontrollably for five hours Saturday after the spacecraft zipped around Venus, but officials said it should not endanger the $1.35-billion, eight-year mission to Jupiter. Engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory shut off the television camera while they diagnosed the problem, which apparently involved faulty software that made Galileo's computer send incorrect commands to the camera, mission director Neal Ausman said.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Worried engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory revealed Friday that the 16-foot main antenna on NASA's $1.5-billion Galileo Jupiter probe may have failed to unfold properly as planned Thursday. Failure of the umbrella-like 16-foot "high-gain" antenna to open fully would severely limit the speed at which data about Jupiter could be transmitted to Earth and sharply reduce the number of photographs that could be beamed back to the inner solar system.
SCIENCE
July 14, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For the first time, astronomers have spotted water on a planet beyond the solar system. The planet, a gas giant similar to Jupiter known as HD 189733b, orbits a star 63 light-years from Earth in the constellation Vulpecula, according to a study published Thursday in Nature. European astronomers studied its outer atmosphere while it passed in front of its star. As light pierced the atmosphere, it revealed characteristics suggesting the presence of water molecules, the study said.
SCIENCE
January 20, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is zooming toward a close encounter with Jupiter to study its atmosphere, ring system and four of its moons before dashing off to see Pluto in 2015, scientists said Thursday. It will be the seventh probe to visit the solar system's largest planet. After 12 months of flight, the probe is due to make its closest pass by Jupiter on Feb. 28, flying within 1.4 million miles.
SCIENCE
August 5, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jupiter's Great Red Spot -- a high-pressure storm on the big planet's surface -- has been around for centuries, but on Monday, astronomers released images of a young, smaller Jovian storm they call Red Spot Jr. Using the Keck II telescope on Hawaii's Mauna Kea, scientists from UC Berkeley and the W.M. Keck Observatory captured a high-resolution picture of both spots on July 20. Red Spot Jr. is about as wide as Earth and formed between 1998 and 2000. It turned red in December 2005.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2004 | From Associated Press
Northrop Grumman Space Technology has been selected to help NASA design a nuclear-powered spacecraft to orbit and explore three moons of Jupiter that may have oceans beneath their icy surfaces. The $400-million contract with the Redondo Beach-based unit of Northrop Grumman Corp. covers work through mid-2008, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory said.
SCIENCE
December 13, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
NASA plans to dispatch a hulking nuclear-powered spacecraft to determine whether three of Jupiter's icy, planet-sized moons have the potential to harbor life. The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, or JIMO, would spend monthlong stints circling the moons Callisto, Europa and Ganymede, which are believed to have vast oceans tucked beneath thick covers of ice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2000 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A spacecraft that was supposed to die a natural death in 1997 is now being joined near Jupiter by a newer craft, unexpectedly giving scientists the chance to "double team" the giant gas planet, officials at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena said Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1988 | From Associated Press
This year, Mars makes its closest approach to Earth in a generation, and astronomers say the Red Planet's appearance in the night sky may be the astronomical event of 1988. When Mars is closest on Sept. 21--just over 36 million miles away--it will rival Jupiter as the brightest object in the night sky after the moon and Venus. "It won't be this close again until 2003," said Jack Horkheimer, executive director of the Space Transit Planetarium in Miami.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
One key scientist has died and several others have retired while waiting for the often-delayed Galileo spacecraft to blast off for Jupiter, but success moved a little closer Tuesday when a probe that will dash through the Jovian atmosphere was packaged for a trip across town. It was a small step perhaps. But for the men and women who have grown gray and weary while waiting for their mission to get off the ground, any progress is to be cherished.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New evidence from a fly-by of Jupiter's moon Europa has yielded the most compelling evidence yet that a vast ocean of water lies beneath the moon's ice-covered surface, UCLA researchers report today. Using data from the Galileo space probe, the scientists detected a strong magnetic field under the moon's surface, which they said can be accounted for only by the presence of salt water.
NEWS
July 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
Astronomers say they have found a 17th moon orbiting Jupiter. If confirmed, the 3-mile-diameter moon would be the smallest-known satellite of a major planet and the first Jovian moon discovered in 21 years. "When you realize that you were the first person to lay eyes on something that had not been seen before, that's kind of a good feeling," University of Arizona astronomer Jeff Larsen, who made the first observations of the moon in October, said in Saturday's Arizona Daily Star.
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