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Jupiter Spacecraft

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NEWS
April 27, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Just as the Galileo spacecraft nears the end of its 14-year-old struggle, its primary communications link to Earth has become so crippled that it may be necessary to mount the most distant rescue effort in the history of space exploration to salvage the $1-billion-plus mission to Jupiter.
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NEWS
April 27, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Just as the Galileo spacecraft nears the end of its 14-year-old struggle, its primary communications link to Earth has become so crippled that it may be necessary to mount the most distant rescue effort in the history of space exploration to salvage the $1-billion-plus mission to Jupiter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
One key scientist has died and several others have retired while waiting for the often-delayed Galileo spacecraft to blast off for Jupiter, but success moved a little closer Tuesday when a probe that will dash through the Jovian atmosphere was packaged for a trip across town. It was a small step perhaps. But for the men and women who have grown gray and weary while waiting for their mission to get off the ground, any progress is to be cherished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
One key scientist has died and several others have retired while waiting for the often-delayed Galileo spacecraft to blast off for Jupiter, but success moved a little closer Tuesday when a probe that will dash through the Jovian atmosphere was packaged for a trip across town. It was a small step perhaps. But for the men and women who have grown gray and weary while waiting for their mission to get off the ground, any progress is to be cherished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1991 | Information on Valley-area deaths is provided by cooperating mortuaries
Clayne Monson Yeates, a science and mission design manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena who worked on the Galileo unmanned spacecraft project, has died at a Pasadena hospital. He was 55. Yeates died Thursday of complications of a cerebral hemorrhage, said his wife, Laurie Yeates. Born in Logan, Utah, he studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and earned a bachelor's degree in science at Utah State University in Provo.
SCIENCE
September 18, 2003 | Usha Lee McFarling, Times Staff Writer
NASA engineers normally do everything they can to keep spacecraft up and running. On Sunday, they will intentionally send one of their most successful veteran explorers crashing into Jupiter's atmosphere in a dramatic suicide plunge. The aging Galileo spacecraft will plummet into Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere at speeds reaching 108,000 mph, NASA officials said at a briefing Wednesday to detail the hardy spacecraft's impending demise. Death will be swift. "Frictional forces will tear it apart.
OPINION
February 3, 2003 | William E. Burrows, William E. Burrows is an aerospace historian and the author of "By Any Means Necessary: America's Heroes Flying Secret Missions in a Hostile World" (Plume, 2002).
President Bush's remarks after Saturday's tragic loss of the orbiter Columbia and its crew of seven were comforting, but they ignore the fact that the space program has been the stepchild of successive administrations since the Apollo program aimed Americans at the moon. "The cause in which they died will continue," the president said, unaware of the bitter irony of that statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2011 | By Diane K. Fisher
The ancient Romans made up stories about gods and goddesses. These stories are called myths. According to one ancient Roman myth, Jupiter was the top god. He had two brothers and three sisters. The three boys got to divide up the world, with Jupiter getting the sky, Neptune getting the ocean and Pluto getting the underworld. Jupiter was powerful, and he really liked to throw his weight around. He hurled lightning bolts, created booming thunder and cloudbursts of rain, and generally made the other gods nervous.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The shuttle Atlantis roared into space Wednesday on the first leg of the most ambitious planetary mission to date. Galileo, the most sophisticated unmanned spacecraft ever built, was released from the shuttle's cargo bay six hours after the 9:53 a.m. PDT launching and is finally on its way to Jupiter. It was a launching that some scientists were beginning to think they might never see. The spectacular liftoff, which had been delayed several times, marked both a beginning and an end.
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