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Jurgen Habermas

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MAGAZINE
October 23, 1994 | Mitchell Stephens, Mitchell Stephens, who has also profiled Jacques Derrida for the magazine, heads the journalism and mass communication program at New York University
A debate has been raging in the world of scholars and intellectuals. On one side are the "postmodernists"--the thinkers whose ideas inspired the playful, hybrid buildings, outfits and artworks that now grace the American landscape; the thinkers who encouraged a generation of graduate students to "deconstruct" such long-treasured notions as "reason" and "justice." The major figure on the other side of this debate is Jurgen Habermas.
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MAGAZINE
October 23, 1994 | Mitchell Stephens, Mitchell Stephens, who has also profiled Jacques Derrida for the magazine, heads the journalism and mass communication program at New York University
A debate has been raging in the world of scholars and intellectuals. On one side are the "postmodernists"--the thinkers whose ideas inspired the playful, hybrid buildings, outfits and artworks that now grace the American landscape; the thinkers who encouraged a generation of graduate students to "deconstruct" such long-treasured notions as "reason" and "justice." The major figure on the other side of this debate is Jurgen Habermas.
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MAGAZINE
November 27, 1994
The question of whether justice exists and reason can benefit society is all a matter of values, commitment and belief. Jurgen Habermas ("The Theologian of Talk," by Mitchell Stephens, Oct. 23) is not being idealistic when he argues that open, rational dialogue can lead to profound change in attitude and conduct. Look to education for the best example of this. Whatever happened to Camus' point that man's only hope is to gain insight for a better life in spite of all the darkness around him?
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
For about three years, investment cognoscenti have been deviled by snarky comments on Twitter purporting to come from inside the elevator at Goldman Sachs, the investment banking firm that has long been a paragon of capitalism. The disdainful, pointed comments often portrayed the modern economic elite as wildly out of touch and full of contempt for the masses. Now, the New York Times has done the world a service by uncovering the author of the tweets, and it turns out the person doesn't even work at Goldman Sachs and never did. He even lives in Texas and not Manhattan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO -- California Gov. Jerry Brown has been keeping a low public profile this summer, jetting off to Ireland and Germany for a two-week vacation and spending most of his time in his hometown of Oakland, where he's been managing the affairs of state. While staying out of the public eye, the governor did take some time earlier this month to attend a three-day conference on the late author and social critic Ivan Illich, a former friend of the 75-year-old governor, held at one of the Oakland charter schools Brown helped establish while he was mayor of that city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1988 | RUDY KOSHAR, Rudy Koshar, associate professor of history at USC and the author of "Social Life, Local Politics and Nazism" (University of North Carolina, 1986), is a 1988-89 Guggenheim Fellow
Observers of West German public life have been fascinated lately by the so-called battle of the historians (Historikerstreit) , a vitriolic debate over the moral-historical meaning and uniqueness of Nazism and its extermination policies. This barrage of opinions has included harsh public exchanges between the eminent Frankfurt philosopher Jurgen Habermas and the West Berlin historian Ernst Nolte, as well as a stream of articles in newspapers and academic journals.
OPINION
February 9, 2003 | Alan L. Isenberg, Alan L. Isenberg is contributing editor of the world affairs journal Orbis and an affiliated scholar at the Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law at Stanford University. E-mail: ai5@stanford.edu
The interests of the United States and its closest ally, Israel, demand that Saddam Hussein be removed from Iraq before he develops nuclear weapons and his designs become unstoppable. Yet, a policy halfheartedly seeking to democratize the Arab world has no bearing on this imperative. Few systems of government are less natural or appropriate for that region than Western democracy.
OPINION
April 24, 2005 | Victor Navasky, Victor Navasky is the publisher of the Nation and a professor of journalism at Columbia. His book, "A Matter of Opinion" (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), will be published in early May.
It used to be that taking potshots at the media was a right-left thing. From Agnew/Safire we got "nattering nabobs of negativism," and from Chomsky/Herman we got a "propaganda model" manufacturing mass consent. On the right, Accuracy in Media and on the left, Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting. These days it's a little more complicated. The right complains about the liberal media (and Eric Alterman denies it even exists in his book "What Liberal Media?").
OPINION
June 16, 2010 | Tim Rutten
"History is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake." Wednesday, people around the world will gather in libraries and theaters, pubs and restaurants, streets and squares to commemorate a precise set of events that included the preceding snatch of conversation and that occurred between daybreak and midnight in a provincial European city on June 16, 1904 — events they know full well never happened. This, of course, is Bloomsday, the annual celebration of the 20th century's greatest novel, "Ulysses," and of the genius of its author, the Irishman James Joyce.
BOOKS
July 10, 2005 | James D. Squires, James D. Squires is the former editor of the Chicago Tribune and the author of "Read All About It! The Corporate Takeover of America's Newspapers."
Having lived nearly three-quarters of a century, Victor S. Navasky has held strong opinions for a long time. More significant, having begun his editing career in college with the Phoenix at Swarthmore and the Monocle at Yale, he has been perpetually in a position to express them in a voice that resonated in high places. He has worked for the New York Times, written for virtually every important American publication and taught at Princeton, Harvard and Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2009 | Tim Rutten
When an author with Christopher Caldwell's impeccable conservative credentials glosses Edmund Burke in his book's title, it's a safe bet that he's engaged a question whose implications he believes are absolutely fundamental. Burke's great masterpiece of political criticism -- "Reflections on the Revolution in France" -- is, after all, both the foundational text of contemporary conservatism and a continuing inspiration to classical liberals. Caldwell's closely argued thesis in "Reflections on the Revolution in Europe: Immigration, Islam, and the West" is that the massive migration of Muslim immigrants into Western Europe now represents as much of a consequential break with Europe's cultural traditions as the utopian rationalism of revolutionary France did for Burke.
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