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NEWS
June 13, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court warned judges Monday about second-guessing verdicts in discrimination cases and said that juries usually should decide whether workers have been subjected to illegal bias. The unanimous ruling restores a verdict awarding $100,000 in damages won by a 57-year-old factory supervisor in Mississippi who was fired after his boss told him he was "too damn old to do [his] job." Experts in employment law said that the ruling could have a broad impact.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2001 | MONTE MORIN and JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attempts to win a conviction in Orange County's oldest cold case failed Wednesday when jurors deadlocked over whether Larry Donnell Paige murdered a Santa Ana man 25 years ago as the victim's stepson watched. The case, which relied on cutting-edge technology that sharpened blurry fingerprint images, is the oldest of dozens of unsolved murders that detectives now claim to have solved. In many of those cases, forensic advances have provided authorities with remarkable breakthroughs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imploring a jury to spare his client's life, a defense attorney portrayed Mary Ellen Samuels, who masterminded the murders of her husband and another man, as a cookie-baking jailhouse "den mother" who should not be sentenced to death. To the prosecutor, though, Samuels is a remorseless, money-grubbing killer who deserves to be executed. Now, the decision whether Samuels lives or dies is in a jury's hands.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recorded on videotape for all of San Diego to see, there was La Jolla socialite Elisabeth Anne (Betty) Broderick in green underwear and a gray jail sweat shirt, perched on an upper bunk in her jail cell. No, she said to inquiring deputies, she was not about to move. So here came a swarm of guards, scrambling into the cell and onto the bed, determined to move Betty Broderick to another cell whether she liked it or not. She didn't, and a wrestling match ensued. The guards grabbed for her limbs.
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-profile murder proceeding ended in an uproar Friday after a judge issued a surprise ruling that his own jury instructions were inadequate and that the defendant--charged with killing a teenager over a stolen Halloween pumpkin display--deserves a new trial. The decision in the case of Buena Park homeowner Peter Solomona prompted an angry exchange between the families of the suspect and the victim, Brandon Ketsdever, who was 17.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1993 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Selection of the jury is to begin today for the first trial of Shiley Inc., maker of the potentially defective Bjork-Shiley heart valve. The jury will hear a lawsuit filed last year in Orange County Superior Court by heart-valve recipient Ruth Barillas of San Diego. About 300 people have died because of the valve's failure. The trial is the first of at least six to be heard in Orange County. It is expected to cover a wide range of issues, including whether Shiley--a subsidiary of Pfizer Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1993
The juries have spoken and what they have said to law enforcement is: "Do your job, go to jail. Use a brick, it's a misdemeanor." JOHN J. VALENCIA San Dimas
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2003 | Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writer
Max Weisberg, an unrepentant bookmaker with a savant's knack for numerals who twice persuaded Minnesota juries that he was too simple-minded to understand the nature of his crimes, died Thursday in a nursing home in St. Paul, Minn. He was 79. Weisberg had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and treated at Regions Hospital in St. Paul before he was transferred to the nursing home, said his longtime defense attorney, Ron Meshbesher. An endearing, familiar pear-shaped figure on St.
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