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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2013 | By Jack Leonard
Jurors said overwhelming evidence against a 16-year-old girl charged with killing her mother and stepfather left them with little choice but to find her guilty Friday of first degree-murder. Several members of the Compton jury said they were unconvinced by Cynthia Alvarez's testimony this week that she was helpless to stop her parents from being killed by her boyfriend. The jurors, who declined to give their names, said notes that Alvarez wrote to her boyfriend while he was hiding inside her Compton home shortly before the October 2011 killings showed she played an active role in the crimes.
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NATIONAL
March 3, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - A man whose friend died in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was among potential jurors excused Monday from serving on the trial of Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, Sulaiman abu Ghaith, an alleged Al Qaeda propagandist accused of conspiring to kill Americans. The opening day of jury selection shed light on the effects the 2001 attacks had on some New Yorkers, even those who did not know people wounded or killed. Some potential jurors said they were not sure they could be impartial, given their memories of Sept.
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NATIONAL
November 12, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
James "Whitey" Bulger will appear in court Wednesday to hear the families of his victims speak before he is sentenced, but one of the jurors who decided his fate said she wished she hadn't helped convict him of any murders. Janet Uhlar, juror No. 12, lives in the Cape Cod town of Eastham, where she writes books about figures from the Revolutionary War. In an interview, she said she had learned things since the trial that had made her question the verdict, including the deals Bulger accomplices got in order to testify.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court upheld a death sentence Monday for a man who was forced to wear a stun belt during his trial, rejecting arguments that the prospect of being electrically shocked adversely affected his demeanor before jurors. In a 6-1 decision, the majority noted that the prosecution had conceded the court erred in requiring the stun belt, but the justices concluded that it did not affect the outcome of the trial. The ruling came in an appeal by Jonathan Keith Jackson, who was convicted of murdering Monique Cleveland during an attempted drug-related robbery in Riverside County in 1996 and attempting to murder her husband, Robert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
A San Bernardino County judge ordered an inquiry Thursday into allegations that a member of the jury that rejected the "Zoloft defense" of a former Westminster police detective who was convicted of rape failed to disclose that she had used the antidepressant. The defendant, Anthony Orban, claimed to have been in a drug-induced blackout caused by Zoloft when he abducted and sexually assaulted an Ontario Mills mall waitress in 2010. Orban's attorney, James Blatt of Los Angeles, told Superior Court Judge Shahla Sabet that after the verdict in late June one of the jurors contacted his office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1999
Re "Juror Dismissed From Case for Using Legal Dictionary," Feb. 2. Why would a judge dismiss a juror for taking the initiative to understand his or her responsibilities better? It appears to be a case of dumbing down our legal process. Only unsophisticated jurors need apply, to be at the mercy of the trial lawyers. To have some understanding of our legal system is grounds for immediate dismissal. DONALD E. BING, Moorpark
NEWS
April 12, 1986 | Associated Press
A juror in Gov. Edwin W. Edwards' second federal trial on racketeering charges was dismissed Friday after authorities discovered that he had been arrested on a charge of criminal neglect of family. He was replaced by an alternate.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Maybe a book by a juror in the Trayvon Martin murder trial isn't such a good idea after all. On Monday it was announced that one of the jurors who had found George Zimmerman not guilty had landed a literary agent , Sharlene Martin of Martin Literary Management. Juror B37 -- who told CNN's Anderson Cooper that she had "no doubt" that Zimmerman feared for his life in the moments before he shot and killed Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teenager -- planned to write a book about the trial with her husband, an attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2013 | Robin Abcarian
When the jury first began deliberations in the George Zimmerman murder trial last week, half of the six-woman panel thought he was guilty. Of those leaning toward conviction, two thought he had committed manslaughter and one thought he was guilty of second-degree murder. I find that tidbit - revealed by the only juror who has spoken publicly about the case so far  - immensely comforting. Even if their minds were eventually changed by the arguments of their peers, three jurors on the all-woman, mostly white panel believed that Zimmerman had committed a crime.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
For those who condemned Richard Ramirez to die, the most difficult moment in their long ordeal came on a muggy morning in mid-August, when the judge ordered them to resume deliberations. It was only two days after fellow juror Phyllis Singletary had been murdered by her boyfriend and only a day after a distraught alternate was picked as her replacement. Inside the jury room, there was total silence. "It was traumatic. We were all in shock," recalled juror Donald G. McGee.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A jury in Florida returned a split verdict in the case of Michael Dunn, accused of killing an unarmed teenager in a dispute over loud music - a decision that will put the software engineer in prison for the rest of his life but leaves unanswered lingering questions about race, guns and self-defense law. In its fourth day of deliberation Saturday, the jury convicted Dunn, 47, of four charges. But the jury, which included two African American women, one Latino man, an Asian American woman and eight white people, couldn't reach a decision on the charge of first-degree murder in the killing of Jordan Davis, who would have celebrated his 19th birthday Sunday.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The Florida jury weighing the fate of Michael Dunn, accused of shooting an unarmed teenager to death during a dispute over loud music, told officials Friday that it had hit a wall in its deliberations and then broken for the night. Deliberations were to resume Saturday morning. Jurors have deliberated for more than 181/2 hours since receiving the case Wednesday afternoon. On Friday, the jury asked the judge whether it could hand in a verdict on some charges even if it could not reach a unanimous agreement on one charge.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Jurors on Wednesday received the murder case of Michael Dunn, the Florida man accused of shooting an unarmed black teenager during a dispute over loudly played music. The sequestered jury began its work by choosing a foreperson before beginning to consider the case. In the prosecution's closing argument Wednesday, Assistant State Atty. Erin Wolfson told jurors that Jordan Davis, 17, was unarmed when Dunn, 47, fired 10 shots at an SUV in which Davis was sitting. Wolfson said no witnesses saw any of the four teenagers in the vehicle with a weapon and that police searches turned up none.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | By Richard Winton
Federal jurors deliberating an excessive-force and civil rights case of a former Hollywood executive against the LAPD on Friday asked to inspect the baton of an officer he says severely beat him. The request from the eight-person jury came before the lunch break on the first day of deliberations. Brian Mulligan, a former co-chairman of Universal Pictures and onetime  Deutsche Bank  vice chairman, suffered multiple nose fractures, a broken shoulder blade and a bloody scalp after two Los Angeles police officers took him into custody in Highland Park in May 2012, he says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | By Richard Winton
A federal jury found Friday that two Los Angeles police officers had not used excessive force when arresting a onetime bank and Hollywood executive whom they believed to be under the influence of drugs known as bath salts. Brian Mulligan, 54, a former Deutsche Bank vice chairman, sued the Los Angeles Police Department and two of its officers, claiming that James Nichols and John Miller had used batons to break his nose and shoulder during the May 16, 2012, encounter. After hearing three days of testimony, jurors took less than three hours to reach a verdict, finding that the officers had not violated Mulligan's federal or state civil rights or battered him. Much of the trial focused on Mulligan's mental state that night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A federal appeals court became the first in the nation to rule that prospective jurors may not be excluded because of their sexual orientation, a decision that expands juror protections beyond race and gender and provides legal ammunition to challenge laws that limit gay rights. The sweeping, unanimous decision Tuesday by a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a mixed jury verdict in an antitrust case involving an AIDS drug. The 9th Circuit said the case would have to be retried because an obviously gay juror was unjustifiably excluded from the jury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2013 | By Corina Knoll and Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
After nearly five days of deliberations, jurors in the Bell corruption trial were ordered Thursday to begin anew after a member of the panel was dismissed for misconduct and replaced by an alternate. The original juror, a white-haired woman identified only as Juror No. 3, told Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kennedy she had gone onto a legal website to look up jury instructions and then asked her daughter to help find a definition for the word "coercion. " Although all but one defense attorney requested that the woman stay, Kennedy said the juror needed to be removed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1993 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A question from the jury in the Reginald O. Denny beating trial indicates that a conflict has arisen between at least two members of the panel. The question sent to Superior Court Judge John W. Ouderkirk in two different versions Friday suggests that one juror has accused another of not deliberating. The panel wanted to know if a juror can be accused of not deliberating after he or she has reached a decision based on jury instructions and stated a reason for that decision "numerous times."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
At the heart of the Kelly Thomas murder case is a grainy black-and-white video that covers, almost in its entirety, the struggle between the homeless man and police officers at a bustling Fullerton bus depot on a summer night in 2011. As jurors in Orange County now deliberate the fate of the officers, they must determine what that video actually shows. Prosecutors say the tape clearly presents a confused and vulnerable Thomas who died because one bully cop picked a fight and another lost control and slammed Thomas in the face repeatedly with his stun gun. In the defense's telling, the video captures a violent and errant street person who gave police the fight of their lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
Orange County Dist. Atty. Tony Rackauckas told jurors Tuesday that they will be the conscience of the county when they decide whether a pair of former street cops should be convicted of beating a homeless man to death at a busy Fullerton bus station in 2011. “You're going to send a message to the defendants, to the police and to the public as to whether or not the conduct depicted in this case … is acceptable,” Rackauckas said. Rackauckas presented his closing argument Tuesday morning in the case of former Officer Manuel Ramos and former Cpl. Jay Cicinelli.
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