Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJurors
IN THE NEWS

Jurors

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1989 | LOIS TIMNICK, Times Staff Writer
In Hollywood anything is possible, and so it was that a Superior Court jury toured the McMartin Pre-School on Wednesday after a set-building company "reconstructed" it to approximate the way it looked in the late 1970s and early '80s when children were allegedly molested there. Bused to Manhattan Beach along with Los Angeles Superior Court Judge William Pounders in a Sheriff's Department van, jurors got their first and only look at the nursery school they have been hearing testimony about for nearly two years in the trial of Raymond Buckey and his mother, Peggy McMartin Buckey.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Ryan Menezes
A mistrial was declared Tuesday in the trial of a father accused of killing his 6-month-old son in East Compton. Jurors failed to reach a unanimous verdict on two counts against David Gomez, 26. The jury was split 8-4 on the charge of second-degree murder and 10-2 on child abuse causing death, the prosecutor on the case said. On Oct. 4, 2012, Abel Gomez was admitted to Miller Children's Hospital in Long Beach with skull fractures and brain injuries. Earlier that night, David Gomez knocked on a neighbor's door holding an injured Abel, who was short of breath.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 26, 1989
Jurors in the trial of former White House aide Oliver L. North completed another day of deliberation without a recurrence of medical complaints that had marked their previous day's work. A Public Health Service nurse examined juror Jean Johnson, 53, who had complained of high blood pressure Monday, and no further difficulties were reported from the jury room. Two other jurors with heavy colds were reported still at work. Having finished 21 hours of deliberation over four days, jurors were transported to their hotel for the night with instructions to resume their sessions this morning.
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Oscar Pistorius on Tuesday told a South African courtroom - and the world - his version of what happened the night he shot and killed his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp last year. It was quite an emotional tale . But was it the truth? Sure, he cried and cried. Just as he did on Monday. But he didn't throw up, as he did during earlier testimony in the case. Nevertheless, the judge adjourned the trial to give Pistorius time to compose himself. So clearly Pistorius is upset.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2008 | Scott Glover
The jury in the MySpace cyber-bullying case has reached verdicts on three of four counts against a Missouri woman accused of perpetrating a hoax on a teenage girl who later committed suicide. Jurors deliberated all day Monday before telling the judge just before 5 p.m. that they had reached verdicts on three counts but were split on the fourth. U.S. District Judge George H. Wu sent the jurors home and asked them to return this morning for further deliberations on the final count. He did not ask jurors which counts they had reached verdicts on. Lori Drew, 49, is charged with three counts of violating federal computer statutes and one count of conspiracy for allegedly creating a MySpace account in the name of a fictitious 16-year-old boy and using it to engage in an online relationship with 13-year-old Megan Meier.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
The case against fired White House aide Oliver L. North went to a federal court jury late Thursday after the judge told the panel that North's superiors did not have the right to "order anyone to violate the law" and that he could not be found innocent merely on those grounds. The instructions from U.S. District Judge Gerhard A. Gesell, before jurors were sequestered for the night, partly undercut North's principal line of defense. One of North's attorneys objected to the instructions.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2013 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The jury that will decide the fate of Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, accused of gunning down fellow soldiers at this central Texas military base, is an elite group of Army officers operating under a military legal system that must strike a delicate balance. Military law and courtroom rules strive to promote fairness to the defendant and free inquiry among jurors of varying ranks, despite constant reminders of the importance of rank, right down to the jurors' seating arrangements. Military law also guarantees that there will not be a hung jury.
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | ANN W. O'NEILL and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A jury Wednesday spared the lives of Lyle and Erik Menendez, who shotgunned their millionaire parents to death in Beverly Hills in 1989 and now will spend the rest of their days in state prison with no hope of parole. As the verdicts were read in the tension-filled Van Nuys courtroom, a wave of relief seemed to sweep over the brothers and their defense attorneys when they realized that the jury had rejected the death penalty. The defense lawyers reacted with grins, tears and hugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1993 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON
With one of the two juries in the Menendez brothers murder trial listening again to snatches of testimony, another day passed without a verdict. Lyle Menendez's jury, in a 10th day of deliberations, requested the rereading of testimony about his hairpiece and about the origins of a tape-recorded session between the brothers and their Beverly Hills psychologist, L. Jerome Oziel, on Dec. 11, 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1994 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Erik Menendez's jury was read back testimony Friday about his "confused" sexual orientation, an issue that emerged late in the Menendez brothers' murder trial as prosecutors suggested that it might provide a motive to kill. The jury, in its 15th day of deliberations, sent a note asking to hear "all testimony about or allusions to Erik's homosexuality."
OPINION
April 7, 2014 | By Charis E. Kubrin and Erik Nielson
For 16 months, Bay Area rapper Deandre Mitchell - better known as Laz Tha Boy - has been sitting in a jail cell faced with a decision no artist should have to make: whether to defend his innocence at trial, knowing his music likely will be used as evidence against him, or take a plea bargain and admit to crimes he maintains he did not commit. Mitchell's case dates to October 2012, when he was indicted for his alleged role in two gang-related shootings that occurred that year. Prosecutors didn't present a single arrest or conviction to establish Mitchell's association with a criminal gang, and with conflicting eyewitness testimony - and no physical evidence connecting him to the shootings, according to defense attorney John Hamasaki - prosecutors elected to introduce something else: Mitchell's violent gangsta rap videos and lyrics, which were presented to the grand jury as evidence of his criminal behavior.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2014 | By Michael Muskal, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
It's a decorous shoe that a woman would wear for a night on the town: a size 9 navy pump. Even the 5-inch heel doesn't seem out of place. But then there is the blood, which carries a different message. Jurors in Houston on Tuesday got their first real look at what prosecutors say was a murder weapon and defense lawyers argue was Ana Trujillo's only way of defending herself from her on-again, off-again boyfriend. Trujillo, 45, is charged with using her stiletto heel 25 times to pound Alf Stefan Andersson, 59, to death.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK--The conviction of a former Al Qaeda spokesman Wednesday for crimes stemming from the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks could bolster calls for the movement of high-profile terror suspects out of Guantanamo Bay to civilian courts, but the defendant's attorney said the trial was unfair and promised an appeal. After a jury found Sulaiman Abu Ghaith guilty, defense attorney Stanley Cohen said his case had been hampered by the absence of certain witnesses whose testimony was not allowed; by the judge's instructions to the jury; and by U.S. District Judge Lewis A. Kaplan's own statements as jurors entered a second day of deliberations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- The California Supreme Court upheld a death sentence Monday for a man who was forced to wear a stun belt during his trial, rejecting arguments that the prospect of being electrically shocked adversely affected his demeanor before jurors. In a 6-1 decision ,  the majority noted that the prosecution had conceded the court erred in requiring the stun belt, but the justices concluded it did not affect the outcome of the trial. The ruling came in an appeal by Jonathan Keith Jackson,  who was convicted of murdering a woman during an attempted drug-related robbery in Riverside County and sentenced to death.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - A man whose friend died in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was among potential jurors excused Monday from serving on the trial of Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, Sulaiman abu Ghaith, an alleged Al Qaeda propagandist accused of conspiring to kill Americans. The opening day of jury selection shed light on the effects the 2001 attacks had on some New Yorkers, even those who did not know people wounded or killed. Some potential jurors said they were not sure they could be impartial, given their memories of Sept.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
A jury in Florida returned a split verdict in the case of Michael Dunn, accused of killing an unarmed teenager in a dispute over loud music - a decision that will put the software engineer in prison for the rest of his life but leaves unanswered lingering questions about race, guns and self-defense law. In its fourth day of deliberation Saturday, the jury convicted Dunn, 47, of four charges. But the jury, which included two African American women, one Latino man, an Asian American woman and eight white people, couldn't reach a decision on the charge of first-degree murder in the killing of Jordan Davis, who would have celebrated his 19th birthday Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1993
I read the comments of one of the jurors in the aftermath of the Rodney King federal trial with interest (April 18). To the reporter who attempted to interview him, he is quoted as saying, "Why should I talk to you when others will pay?" Who knows how high he is setting his sights? Movie deals . . . recording contracts . . . Geraldo? The morality of such actions is questionable, but there is a practical issue to consider as well. In the absence of laws restricting jurors from selling their stories, objective verdicts are endangered by the prospect of potential profits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2011 | By Jack Leonard, Los Angeles Times
When Compton jurors recently deliberated the fate of a man charged with possessing a concealed firearm, they thought the evidence was overwhelming - not that the man was guilty but that the Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies who testified against him had lied. Jurors said a video of the arrest and inconsistent testimony from deputies left them no choice earlier this month but to vote for acquittal. The five jurors who spoke to The Times said authorities should investigate the deputies from the sheriff's anti-gang-unit who were involved in the case.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The Florida jury weighing the fate of Michael Dunn, accused of shooting an unarmed teenager to death during a dispute over loud music, told officials Friday that it had hit a wall in its deliberations and then broken for the night. Deliberations were to resume Saturday morning. Jurors have deliberated for more than 181/2 hours since receiving the case Wednesday afternoon. On Friday, the jury asked the judge whether it could hand in a verdict on some charges even if it could not reach a unanimous agreement on one charge.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|