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Jurors Blacks

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February 6, 1998 | From Associated Press
Lawyers defending the Army's former top soldier on sexual misconduct charges complained Thursday that the dismissal of the only black enlisted man from the jury pool risks making the government look racist. "How is it going to appear?" defense lawyer Lt. Col. V. Montgomery Forrester said on the second day of jury selection. "It's not going to appear good at all that the government has removed the only [enlisted] African American member of the panel." A black officer was left in the jury pool.
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NEWS
February 6, 1998 | From Associated Press
Lawyers defending the Army's former top soldier on sexual misconduct charges complained Thursday that the dismissal of the only black enlisted man from the jury pool risks making the government look racist. "How is it going to appear?" defense lawyer Lt. Col. V. Montgomery Forrester said on the second day of jury selection. "It's not going to appear good at all that the government has removed the only [enlisted] African American member of the panel." A black officer was left in the jury pool.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
O.J. Simpson's top lawyer Wednesday accused his legal foes of ousting an African American juror solely because of her race, but a judge ruled that the plaintiffs had valid reasons for dismissing the panelist in question. The accusation--raised during a closed-door conference with the judge--came in the middle of a fast-paced day in which the plaintiffs bumped five blacks off the panel and the defense dismissed three whites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
O.J. Simpson's top lawyer Wednesday accused his legal foes of ousting an African American juror solely because of her race, but a judge ruled that the plaintiffs had valid reasons for dismissing the panelist in question. The accusation--raised during a closed-door conference with the judge--came in the middle of a fast-paced day in which the plaintiffs bumped five blacks off the panel and the defense dismissed three whites.
NEWS
April 8, 1986
A jury was seated in New Orleans for the second trial of Louisiana Gov. Edwin W. Edwards on charges that he schemed illegally to use his influence to obtain state certification for hospital and nursing home projects in which he held interests. The selection of nine men and three women jurors--eight blacks and four whites--cleared the way for opening arguments in the trial of Edwards and four co-defendants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1985
Police combed Linda Vista late Monday for a 3-year-old Laotian boy who disappeared from his home in the early afternoon. Santi Khanthomg, who also is known by the nickname "Ole," apparently wandered away from the Ulric Street apartment building where he lives with his mother, a San Diego Police Department spokesmen said. The boy was last seen at 1:30 p.m. wearing a light green sweater over a red and black striped long-sleeved T-shirt, blue pants and sandals, Bill Robinson said.
NEWS
October 8, 1995 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Echoing the views of people nationwide, most Los Angeles County residents disagreed with the acquittal of O.J. Simpson and only a quarter of those questioned in a new Los Angeles Times Poll believe he was innocent in the slayings of his former wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald Lyle Goldman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
A favorite editor often told me that when you don't know anything about the story you're writing, the best thing to do is talk to lots of people and ask them plenty of questions. I thought of that advice from Ed Guthman, now a USC journalism professor, as I tried to figure out how to write about race and the O.J. Simpson murder case. It's been part of the case from the beginning, and for understandable reasons.
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | TIM RUTTEN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It's Monday morning. One year and six days ago, you turned up for jury duty and--without realizing quite what was happening--checked your real life at the door. You're a juror in O.J. Simpson's double murder case and, now, "the Trial of the Century" is in your lap. So how do you do it? You have listened for months. You have taken notes that even you may no longer be able to read.
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