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Jurors Finances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2001 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The juror had nothing against doing his civic duty. But he hadn't planned on digging into his own pocket to pay for it. The Delta Air Lines worker had hit the company's limit for paid jury leave after 15 days on the Rampart police corruption trial. But the case would take two weeks more. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Jacqueline Connor felt she could not let the juror go in mid-trial. Connor phoned Delta repeatedly to plead for more paid days off.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2001 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The juror had nothing against doing his civic duty. But he hadn't planned on digging into his own pocket to pay for it. The Delta Air Lines worker had hit the company's limit for paid jury leave after 15 days on the Rampart police corruption trial. But the case would take two weeks more. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Jacqueline Connor felt she could not let the juror go in mid-trial. Connor phoned Delta repeatedly to plead for more paid days off.
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NEWS
September 15, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Give the juror a few thousand dollars and save the county millions. That's the advice McMartin case judge William R. Pounders would give his colleague in the trial of O.J. Simpson. And that's what may have been done late yesterday, when Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito apparently resolved a plea from a juror who said her public service had put her into financial distress and that unless she got some help she would have to bail out.
NEWS
July 30, 1998 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pity the poor juror. It's bad enough to be tied to the courthouse with nothing but an old paperback and a wilting checkerboard. Now it turns out that the state has been holding back on the five bucks a day that jurors make for their trouble. In Los Angeles County courthouses and others throughout the state, thousands of jurors have gone without pay since July 1, when the state budget impasse choked off funding for all court services but salaried employees and court reporters.
NEWS
July 30, 1998 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pity the poor juror. It's bad enough to be tied to the courthouse with nothing but an old paperback and a wilting checkerboard. Now it turns out that the state has been holding back on the five bucks a day that jurors make for their trouble. In Los Angeles County courthouses and others throughout the state, thousands of jurors have gone without pay since July 1, when the state budget impasse choked off funding for all court services but salaried employees and court reporters.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Give the juror a few thousand dollars and save the county millions. That's the advice McMartin case judge William R. Pounders would give his colleague in the trial of O.J. Simpson. And that's what may have been done late yesterday, when Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito apparently resolved a plea from a juror who said her public service had put her into financial distress and that unless she got some help she would have to bail out.
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