Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJurors Women
IN THE NEWS

Jurors Women

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
August 2, 1992 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The jurors are the stars of the show. There are eight of them, and they're all women. And they're most visible four times a day, when they enter and leave the courtroom. By order of presiding Judge David S. Doty, the women who are determining pro football's fate this summer march in from a rear door, moving briskly down the center aisle. And they leave the same way. After the fifth week of the antitrust suit filed against the league by eight players, Doty still has no other options, he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2008 | Christine Hanley, Hanley is a Times staff writer.
With tawdry moments that might play better to a Jerry Springer audience, jurors in Orange County are being introduced to the alleged sexual escapades and innuendoes that prosecutors say shape the corruption case against former Sheriff Michael S. Carona. With his trial hardly a week old, witnesses have been repeatedly asked about Carona's alleged extramarital affair with a local attorney, with tales of a love nest, a getaway trip to Las Vegas and a secret bank account.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2005 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
The eight alternate jurors for Michael Jackson's child-molestation trial were selected Thursday, and opening statements were scheduled for next week. Santa Barbara County Superior Court Judge Rodney S. Melville set the opening arguments -- in a trial expected to last as long as five months -- for Monday at 8:30 a.m. Melville told the alternate jurors that they had an elevated importance compared with other trials because high-profile cases offer greater temptations for jury misconduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2005 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
The eight alternate jurors for Michael Jackson's child-molestation trial were selected Thursday, and opening statements were scheduled for next week. Santa Barbara County Superior Court Judge Rodney S. Melville set the opening arguments -- in a trial expected to last as long as five months -- for Monday at 8:30 a.m. Melville told the alternate jurors that they had an elevated importance compared with other trials because high-profile cases offer greater temptations for jury misconduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2008 | Christine Hanley, Hanley is a Times staff writer.
With tawdry moments that might play better to a Jerry Springer audience, jurors in Orange County are being introduced to the alleged sexual escapades and innuendoes that prosecutors say shape the corruption case against former Sheriff Michael S. Carona. With his trial hardly a week old, witnesses have been repeatedly asked about Carona's alleged extramarital affair with a local attorney, with tales of a love nest, a getaway trip to Las Vegas and a secret bank account.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2005 | Claire Luna, Times Staff Writer
Torn between sympathy for an abused son and disgust that he would kill his mother to escape the abuse, a panel of Orange County jurors convicted a 22-year-old man of first-degree murder Friday. It took more than 15 hours of deliberations before jurors agreed that Jason Victor Bautista intended to beat and strangle his mentally ill mother in their Riverside apartment, before cutting off her head and hands and dumping the torso off Ortega Highway near San Juan Capistrano.
NEWS
September 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Andrea Yates' mental state is improving but she is not well enough to immediately go on trial in the drownings of her children, a defense psychologist testified in Houston. "She is rapidly getting better," Dr. Gerald Harris, a clinical psychologist, testified at a competence hearing. He has visited Yates four times since June 20, when she summoned police to her southeast Houston home and officers found the bodies of her five children.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2004 | From Associated Press
After nine days of questioning, a jury of 12 was seated Thursday for the trial of Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry L. Nichols on murder charges that could bring the death penalty. The jury of six men and six women includes a retired Army Special Forces officer, a homemaker, a chef at an Italian restaurant, an accountant and a computer networking specialist. Also seated were six alternate jurors -- three women and three men. Opening statements are set for March 22.
NEWS
February 3, 1989
Selection of a jury pool for Oliver L. North's Iran-Contra trial reached the halfway point, with the judge predicting the effort will take most of next week also. By the end of the third day of selecting a pool of 50 potential jurors, 18 women and seven men had been qualified after painstaking, often solicitous questioning. U.S. District Judge Gerhard A.
SPORTS
August 2, 1992 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The jurors are the stars of the show. There are eight of them, and they're all women. And they're most visible four times a day, when they enter and leave the courtroom. By order of presiding Judge David S. Doty, the women who are determining pro football's fate this summer march in from a rear door, moving briskly down the center aisle. And they leave the same way. After the fifth week of the antitrust suit filed against the league by eight players, Doty still has no other options, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1990
A jury was impaneled in Los Angeles on Thursday in the trial of a reputed cocaine dealer and three alleged hit men charged with murdering a New York producer in a dispute over financing of the movie "The Cotton Club." The Superior Court jury of nine women and three men as well as six alternate jurors, all women, was selected over a month's time. Opening statements in the trial are scheduled for Oct. 31. Final pretrial motions will be argued until then.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2000 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Asserting that the officers who investigated alleged Hollywood madam Jody Babydol Gibson did nothing improper, an LAPD supervisor testified Friday the department has allowed officers on undercover vice assignments to disrobe as a matter of policy. "The policy came about because we investigate massage parlors," said Det. Keith R. Haight, who is in charge of the prostitution section of the Los Angeles Police Department's Organized Crime and Vice Division.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|