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NATIONAL
June 23, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
As the verdict was read - guilty, guilty, guilty - Jerry Sandusky's emotionless expression was proof for jurors that they'd made the right decision. "The look on his face… no real emotion, just kind of accepting,” said juror Joshua Harper, a high school teacher in State College, Pa., in an interview with NBC . “You know, because he knew it was true.” Harper on Saturday morning became the first juror to speak publicly about the experience of the five men and seven women who effectively handed the 68-year-old former Penn State coach a sentence of life in prison.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2013 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
A lingering venom spilled out on questionnaires given to potential jurors for the trial of six former Bell city leaders charged with raiding the treasury in the small, working-class town. "My mind is made up, I can't be impartial. I'm disgusted by the behavior," wrote one juror, who was excused Tuesday by a Los Angeles County Superior Court judge. Another potential juror described being "riveted and repulsed by the greed and audacity" and had a "negative description of the case from news reporting.
SPORTS
January 31, 2012 | Staff and wire reports
Prosecutors in the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse case asked Tuesday to have jurors brought in from another Pennsylvania county, a day after disclosing in court records they would tell the former Penn State assistant coach the names of his 10 alleged victims. The attorney general's office argued in a court motion that pretrial publicity and Penn State's prominent role in its local community mean Sandusky's criminal trial warrant the use of jurors from outside the State College area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
Jurors in the trial of two former Fullerton police officers accused of beating a mentally ill homeless man to death will probably be told to disregard the opinions of witnesses who said the two acted within department policy. The admonition is expected to be part of jury instructions that are still being negotiated by attorneys in the trial over the beating death of Kelly Thomas. “You are ordered to disregard those opinions,” a draft of the admonition says. “It is up to you to determine whether the defendants used excessive or unreasonable force based on all the evidence that has been presented in this trial but you may not consider evidence that has been stricken.” The probable instruction results from prosecutors' attempts to challenge the testimony of two witnesses who said defendants Manuel Ramos and Jay Cicinelli acted, for the most part, within Fullerton Police Department policy.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1991
There is a fundamental reason why jurors are poorly treated (Times, Feb. 3): They are inexpensive! Jurors get paid just $5 per day. The main problem with such low pay is that it devalues jurors' time and dignity. It encourages the court to treat jurors shabbily, like a low-value commodity. A lawyer makes more in an hour than a jury of 12 people makes in a day. Years ago, when jurors were paid $10 a day (probably equivalent to $25 today), the entire system seemed to move faster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams
Spurned in his effort to get out of jury duty, salesman Tony Prados turned his attention to the case that could cost him three weeks' pay: A Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy was suing his former sergeant, alleging severe emotional distress inflicted by lewd and false innuendo that he was gay. Prados, an ex-Marine, leaned forward in the jury box and asked in a let-me-get-this-straight tone of voice: "He's brave enough to go out and get shot...
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Ted Rall
Legislation approved by the Assembly would make California the first state to allow noncitizens to serve on juries. Naturally, the courts would have to make certain adjustments. ALSO: The power of jury duty Photo gallery: Ted Rall cartoons Kenny Smith schools Chris Broussard on inclusiveness Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall
NATIONAL
July 17, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
How do you guarantee a fair jury for one of the most talked-about criminal trials in the country? You lock 'em up, of course. The six female jurors chosen to decide whether George Zimmerman would go free or head to prison spent 22 nights in plush detention as they weighed his case -- squirreled away from the public and sequestered in a hotel by deputies so they wouldn't be tainted by media coverage and loose talk of the case. And according to new details released by the Seminole County Sheriff's Office, that bit of judicial precaution didn't come cheap: It cost $33,000 to feed, house and entertain the six jurors when they weren't in the county courthouse.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Jurors in the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse trial resumed their deliberations  on Friday after listening to testimony from one of the prosecution's star witnesses -- and a defense witness who told of slightly different details. The jury of seven women and five men entered the courtroom in Bellefonte, Pa., just before 9 a.m.  local time to start their second day of deliberations in the case against Sandusky, a former Penn State assistant football coach. Jurors worked more than eight hours on Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1986
On Dec. 11 I received a jury summons to appear for jury duty on Dec. 22. I cannot understand why prospective jurors are being contacted only 10 days before they are required to serve. The policy is totally uncalled for and disrespectful of others' personal lives. It is an even greater violation when that notice arrives just before the holidays. It places an added burden on employers who have staffs at bare minimum to allow for vacations. I think it is a reflection of poor planning/management that the need for jurors cannot be anticipated more in advance so that prospective jurors and their employers could be given a month to two months notice.
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