Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJury Selection
IN THE NEWS

Jury Selection

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
June 11, 2013 | By Michael Muskal and Tina Susman
The extensive process of examining potential jurors in the George Zimmerman homicide case continues Tuesday morning, after the well-publicized case got off to a slow start Monday. Despite the notoriety, the heavy newspaper coverage and hours of television, cable and radio coverage, the initial potential jurors said they weren't following the events closely but had heard at least the bare bones of the fateful confrontation between Zimmerman, 29, and an unarmed African American teenager, Trayvon Martin.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge Friday refused to halt or dismiss the case against Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, saying that suggestions the government had charged the wrong man were “utterly meritless” and ruling that the first Sept. 11-related trial to be held in New York will open with jury selection on Monday. Defense lawyers for Sulaiman abu Ghaith had filed a last-minute request for a delay in the trial or dismissal of the case altogether, claiming they had uncovered evidence that another man, a detainee at Guantanamo Bay, is the actual person who was the top Al Qaeda propagandist and warned of more airplane attacks.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
February 19, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber
Jury selection began Tuesday in preparation for the capital murder trial of  the so-called Craigslist killer, who allegedly lured his suspects to rural Ohio in 2011 with fake farm-job offers. The world found out about Richard Beasley, a 53-year-old, self-styled street preacher, after one of his alleged victims, Scott Davis, managed to escape and call the police.  During the trial last fall of Beasley's suspected co-conspirator -- a teenager who had considered Beasley his mentor -- Davis testified that he responded to a Craigslist ad to do work in southern Ohio in the fall of 2011.  In testimony posted online by a Cleveland news station, Davis said that after walking out to a wooded area with Beasley, he heard a cuss word and then the cocking of a gun. “I knew I was in trouble,” Davis said, adding that although he got shot in the arm, the gun jammed and he was able to escape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2014 | By Adolfo Flores
Jury selection begins Tuesday in a discrimination case in which three Latino police officers contend they were routinely passed over for promotions and two of them were given the "dead end" job of patrolling a local mall. The three Westminster officers maintain that despite years of service and numerous awards their careers have languished as non-Latino officers have been promoted and given prestigious assignments in the predominantly Asian city. "These three Latino officers dedicate their lives, put their lives on the line and have been outstanding officers and they've been denied opportunities, at every turn, to move up the ranks," said Victor Viramontes, an attorney representing the officers.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Jury selection in the Chicago murder trial involving the family of movie star and singer Jennifer Hudson began in earnest on Monday, again raising the question of just how much celebrity influences justice. Perhaps no city is more aware than Los Angeles of how celebrity ramps up the visibility of even routine cases, let alone major judicial proceedings such as murder charges. From O.J. Simpson to Phil Spector to Michael Jackson (and, separately, his doctor); from Lindsay Lohan to Paris Hilton to Mel Gibson, the list seems endless, with new stars seemingly added almost every day. Now it's the turn of Chicago, no stranger to colorful characters and their trials, including Al Capone and the Chicago Seven.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
SAN JOSE -- A trial pitting Apple against Samsung kicked off Monday in federal court in San Jose, with jury selection underway in the closely watched patent-infringement case. Prospective jurors were grilled through the morning about whether they had friends who worked at Apple or other tech companies; the brand of their cellphones and tablets; and what books they had read concerning Apple and/or Samsung. The selection process took place in U.S. District Judge Lucy H. Koh's courtroom on the fifth floor of the courthouse, with dozens of prospective jurors sitting in several rows of seats usually used by spectators.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2013 | By Michael Muskal and Tina Susman
The second day of jury selection in the George Zimmerman murder trial inched along on Tuesday as lawyers tried to uncover the politics and leanings of prospective jurors. Zimmerman, 29, is charged with second-degree murder in the shooting of unarmed African American teenager Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman has apologized for shooting Martin, 17, in a confrontation on Feb. 26, 2012, in Sanford, Fla., but insists he acted in self-defense. The case sparked local and national demonstrations accusing Zimmerman, a former neighborhood watch volunteer, of having profiled Martin because the teenager was black.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1993
With more and more attention being focused on the racial makeup of juries, perhaps the time has come to make the selection of potential jurors while seated behind a screen or tinted glass partition rendering ethnic characteristics difficult to distinguish. If the jury selection process is to preserve its integrity and credibility, this format should help allay any doubt or suggestion as to whether a panelist was excused based exclusively on his race. With the fate of defendants resting virtually in the hands of the jury, it is incumbent that the jurors know that their selection was based on factors beyond race alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2013 | By Steve Marble
Michael Jackson's doomed comeback attempt is again taking center stage in Los Angeles as the pop singer's family and the entertainment behemoth AEG square off in a legal showdown that could last months. Jackson's mother and children are suing the Los Angeles entertainment giant, alleging it is liable for Jackson's death because it hired and supervised Dr. Conrad Murray, who used a powerful surgical anesthetic in an effort to help the singer cope with insomnia. Murray was convicted of involuntary manslaughter in 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2013 | By Jean Merl
More than three years after a grand jury indicted state Sen. Roderick Wright on charges of perjury and voting fraud, the Inglewood Democrat's trial is scheduled to start on Thursday.  Jury selection will begin in the morning on the first day the court is open after the New Year's Day holiday, according to the court's calendar. Wright's attorney, Kevin Winston McKesson, said he will ask for a couple of days' break between jury selection and opening...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Jury selection has opened in the trial of two former Fullerton police officers accused in the beating death of Kelly Thomas, a mentally ill homeless man who was a well-known figure in the city's downtown area. Former Officer Manuel Ramos is charged with second-degree murder and involuntary manslaughter and former Cpl. Jay Cicinelli with involuntary manslaughter and excessive use of force in the July 2011 death of the 37-year-old Thomas. A third officer, Joseph Wolfe, faces involuntary manslaughter charges and will be tried separately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Ruben Vives
Jury selection is set to begin Monday in the public-corruption trial of Angela Spaccia --  the second-in-command in Bell when the city erupted in scandal. Under former city manager Robert Rizzo, Spaccia pulled in a salary of $376,000 a year and doubled as the top administrator in neighboring Maywood, a city that let go most of its civic employees after it lost its insurance in 2010. Rizzo pleaded no contest last week to 69 felony charges, including misappropriating public funds.
OPINION
September 26, 2013
Re "Fairness for the jury pool," Editorial, Sept. 20 I am a lawyer who respectfully disagrees with your support for abolishing peremptory challenges. These challenges remain necessary to assure that people who are likely biased can be excused as jurors. A recent example: In a personal injury case, five of the first 12 prospective jurors emphatically stated their belief that an injured plaintiff should recover little or no money for pain and suffering. In response to questions from the judge, all five said they could put these attitudes aside and award such damages if the facts and law supported recovery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A federal appeals court grappled Wednesday with whether a prohibition against excluding jurors because of race or gender should be extended to sexual orientation. During an hourlong hearing, a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals peppered lawyers with questions about the removal of a gay man during jury selection for an antitrust trial two years ago. The dispute between Abbott Laboratories and SmithKline Beecham involved Abbott's price hike for an AIDS drug, which had infuriated the gay community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Weeks before his trial, Robert Rizzo was handed a setback Wednesday when a judge rejected his request to move the corruption case out of Los Angeles County and joked that the once highly paid municipal official should thank disgraced San Diego Mayor Bob Filner for "kind of taking the edge" off him. Rizzo's attorney had asked that the case, filed after The Times exposed the high salaries and questionable financial dealings in Bell, be moved out...
NATIONAL
August 11, 2013 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The jury that will decide the fate of Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, accused of gunning down fellow soldiers at this central Texas military base, is an elite group of Army officers operating under a military legal system that must strike a delicate balance. Military law and courtroom rules strive to promote fairness to the defendant and free inquiry among jurors of varying ranks, despite constant reminders of the importance of rank, right down to the jurors' seating arrangements. Military law also guarantees that there will not be a hung jury.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas -- Military lawyers advising accused Ft. Hood shooter Major Nidal Malik Hasan at his court-martial on Wednesday asked the judge to modify their role in the high-stakes trial, saying Hasan appears to be seeking the death penalty and that to assist him would be “repugnant.” At a court hearing , the military lawyers did not explicitly say they wished to withdraw from the case, but did argue that a change in their "status" was...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|