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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2012 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Riverside jurors ordered the death penalty Tuesday for Earl Ellis Green, who was convicted of fatally shooting Riverside Police Officer Ryan Bonaminio at point-blank range as the officer pleaded for his life. After 3 1/2 hours of deliberations, the panel returned the decision, agreeing with prosecutors who argued that the penalty should fit the crime. The 46-year-old convicted felon, who was on parole at the time of the November 2010 killing, smiled as the jury announced the verdict, witnesses said.
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BUSINESS
July 8, 2010 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
A federal jury in Riverside has dealt what could be a severe blow to how Hollywood studios report profits in television shows and movies, in a decision Wednesday that orders Walt Disney Co. to pay nearly $270 million in damages to the creator of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire." The decision, if upheld on appeal, potentially undercuts the rationale that drove a wave of consolidation that swept the entertainment industry over the last two decades, in which media giants contended that it was economically advantageous to control both the production and distribution of TV programming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1987
Your Editorial ("Excluded From the Jury Box," March 29) does not go far enough. Under today's conditions why should either the attorney for the prosecution or the defense have the right to challenge prospective jurors? The objective of the trial is to obtain justice, but that is not the objective of the attorney. Why not have the judicial branch prepare questionnaires on matters of interest to justice and have the clerk of the court see that one is filled out by each prospective juror to be handed to the judge who is responsible for selecting the jury.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1985
The firm won on all but one count in a $28-million lawsuit brought by former workers who alleged that they were poisoned on the job by chemicals. The federal court jury in Charleston, W.Va., ruled that, although the seven former employees suffer from long-term health problems as a result of on-the-job contact with dioxin, the company did not knowingly poison them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors told a Vista jury Thursday that putting to death Rudolph Jose Roybal, the "coldblooded killer" of a 65-year-old Oceanside woman, would be "morally right." Quoting the Old Testament during closing arguments in the penalty phase of Roybal's trial, Deputy Dist. Atty. Jack Koerber implored the jury to sentence Roybal to die for killing Yvonne Weden in June, 1989, while burglarizing her home. "Don't let him hide behind your conscience, because he has no conscience," Koerber said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2004
Deanne STILLMAN complains that fame and celebrity "corrode every aspect of American life" and warns that this may impact fairness to Robert Blake in his upcoming murder trial ("For Mickey Gubitosi, It's the Role of a Lifetime," Dec. 5). She then goes on to write a two-page Valentine to the accused wife slayer. Unlike Stillman, who seems more of a defense team publicist than a journalist, I have faith in the legal system and believe the jury will not focus on what doesn't matter, i.e. Blake's celebrity and career, but will evaluate the evidence to determine whether this man indeed shot his wife to death and left four children without a mother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2000
Though Timothy Lynch's Jan. 24 commentary, "We All Lose When Judges Overreach," is accurate, such brevity bypasses what may be a greater threat to our venerable jury system. I was elected foreman of a jury deliberating the fate of an individual accused of a "cocaine buy." One juror brought a pocket Bible to the table, which she kept in front of her during the deliberations. At one point, 10 of us were certain that a particular witness had lied during his testimony, another one was not sure, but this particular juror was adamant that he had told the truth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2013 | By Richard Winton
Antonio Lopez Chaj's skull looks a pie chart with a quarter missing. He cannot speak, needs help to walk and needs 24-hour care after being severely beaten by a security guard in a Los Angeles bar three years ago, his attorneys say. After hearing evidence about the horrific April 2010 attack, a Torrance jury awarded the 43-year-old immigrant painter nearly $58 million in economic and medical losses. The Los Angeles resident's injuries were so severe that doctors had to remove a portion of his brain and skull.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1989
The Los Angeles County Grand Jury has charged that the county is failing to meet state standards to inspect restaurants four times a year. In a written statement released this week, the jury put most of the blame on the county's inability to retain qualified staffers. A report by the jury indicated that the actual frequency of county inspection is 1.6 times per year, less than half the state standard. "We recognize that the county has a staffing problem, but we feel that there are reasonable solutions," said jury foreman Robert Leland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By James Barragan
The fate of the co-founder of frozen yogurt giant Pinkberry depends on the answer to one question: Who had the tire iron? Young Lee, 48, is accused of assault with a deadly weapon for allegedly beating Donald Bolding with a tire iron in June 2011 while Bolding was panhandling on the side of an east Hollywood street. After becoming upset that Bolding flashed a tattoo to people in Lee's car - including his fiancee - showing a stick-figure couple having sex, Lee drove away - but he returned with another man and beat Bolding, prosecutors say. During closing arguments Wednesday, the defense attorney and prosecutor alike said the outcome of the case depended on whether the jury believed Lee was the one who wielded the tire iron.
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