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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1995
Justice in America has one color: green. Marcel MATHEVET-FEMLING Costa Mesa
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OPINION
April 28, 2014 | By Bruce Ackerman
"The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice," the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. assured his followers. But was he right? The arc of American history, at least, has a different shape. During the 19th century, a high point for justice was reached after the Civil War, with Reconstruction Republicans guaranteeing equal protection and voting rights for blacks in the 14th and 15th amendments. But these brave words did not prevent a tragic retreat, from the Gilded Age beginning in the 1880s through the Roaring '20s.
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OPINION
November 10, 2013
Re "Trigger the 'nuclear option,'" Editorial, Nov. 1 The Times is correct: Senate Republicans have promiscuously deployed the filibuster in the judicial confirmation process, exacerbating the confirmation wars. The casualties are exceptional attorneys, including Patricia Millett, the nominee to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The D.C. Circuit lacks the resources it needs to deliver justice. Elections do indeed have consequences, and the GOP seems to be practicing a type of nullification when it blocks nominees like Millett for no persuasive reason.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court's new champion of the 4th Amendment, is likely to play a crucial role Tuesday when the court hears this year's most important search case: whether the police may routinely examine the digital contents of a cellphone confiscated during an arrest. Civil libertarians say the stakes are high because arrests are so common - 13.1 million were made in 2010, according to the FBI - and smartphones hold so much private information. Under current law, officers may search a person under arrest, checking pockets and looking through a wallet or purse.
OPINION
November 7, 2012
Re "Teen in girl's slaying to be tried as adult," Oct. 31 Austin Reed Sigg, 17, is accused of committing a horrendous crime, and he should pay the price if convicted. This is not denied. What is difficult here are our inconsistent laws that allow some minors to be tried and treated as adults in a court of law. Yet while they can be treated as adults in courts of law, they cannot have the rights of adults - namely the right to vote, to smoke, to consume alcohol and to be contractually obligated.
OPINION
January 13, 2013
Re "Brown's budget maps out major changes," Jan. 10 Gov. Jerry Brown's proposal to cut the budget for the state courts by an additional $200 million is sad news for California. The cuts that have already taken place have severely impacted the ability of the courts to provide basic services to those seeking justice. The governor and the Legislature have forgotten that the judiciary is a co-equal branch of government with a rightful claim to adequate funding. California arguably once had the finest court system in the nation.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON -- President Obama vowed justice for the victims of the Boston bomb attacks on Monday but cautioned against the urge to “jump to conclusions” before a full investigation is done. “We still do not know who did this or why, and people shouldn't jump to conclusions before we have all the facts,” Obama told reporters. “But make no mistake, we will get to the bottom of this. We will find out who did this, we will find out why they did this. Any responsible individuals, any responsible groups, will feel the full weight of justice.” The remarks came just over three hours after bomb blasts along the route of the Boston Marathon claimed the lives of at least two people and injured at least two dozen more, some of them seriously.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2009
OPINION
September 14, 2009 | Ronald M. George, Ronald M. George is chief justice of California and chairman of the state Judicial Council.
Starting Sept. 16, the largest court system in the nation will be closing the doors of courthouses across the state one day each month. On Wednesday, an estimated 3 million cases will be delayed, 150 jury trials interrupted and 250 child custody cases unheard. Jails will be more crowded as arraignment and release dates are postponed; attorneys and their clients will be inconvenienced, as will jurors; and the public will experience longer lines, more delays and more crowded courtrooms.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department announced a new initiative Wednesday to encourage nonviolent prisoners who have served at least 10 years to apply for what is expected to be a large-scale grant of clemency in President Obama's waning years in office. Deputy Atty. Gen. James M. Cole announced that a new pardons attorney would take over a beefed-up office to handle requests that will be actively solicited throughout the federal prison system from thousands of prisoners who meet six criteria.
OPINION
April 23, 2014
Re "Campus shooter receives 40-year term," April 19 While Brandon Spencer's shooting into a crowd and wounding of four people were inexcusable and foolish acts, I believe his actions were evidence of an immature adolescent brain not functioning well. Most important, I think his sentence of 40 years to life in prison is excessive. I would rather see the money that will be spent on incarcerating him over the next few decades go instead toward putting him through school so he and all taxpayers benefit.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court justices sounded uncertain and conflicted Tuesday in trying to decide whether a TV streaming service that allows users to receive their favorite programs through tiny, rented antennas violates the broadcasters' copyrights. The case of ABC vs. Aereo has the potential to reshape the broadcast and cable industries if the Brooklyn-based upstart prevails in the high court. And that appeared possible after Tuesday's argument. An attorney for the broadcasting industry urged the court to shut down Aereo.
OPINION
April 22, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Comprehensive immigration reform is probably dead for yet another year, the victim - once again - of a dysfunctional Congress that can't even reach agreement on the things it agrees on. There is nothing President Obama can do about that, although if therapy were available for political relationships, there'd be a referral waiting to be made. In the meantime, the president still has to administer immigration laws as they exist, and he reportedly is considering dropping his opposition to bond hearings for detained undocumented immigrants.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Confronting a case that could reshape the television broadcast industry, Supreme Court justices sounded conflicted Tuesday over whether an upstart streaming service is violating copyright laws by enabling subscribers to record programs captured over the air and view them later on the Internet. The court's ruling, due by June, could either shut down New York-based Aereo or clear the way for the growing company to continue providing subscribers with a convenient, low-cost way to watch local broadcast channels without paying for cable or satellite service or putting an antenna on a roof.
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Paul Thornton
Brandon Spencer, the 21-year-old former gang member sentenced to 40 years to life in prison for attempted murder, may have sobbed like a toddler Friday after learning that the next several decades of his life will be spent behind bars, but he deserves little sympathy, wrote Times columnist Sandy Banks on Monday. But several of our readers had a much more charitable, even forgiving, attitude toward Spencer. The two sides don't dispute the facts: A gun-toting Spencer showed up at a Halloween party at USC in 2012 looking to exact revenge on a gang rival; several shots later, three innocent bystanders in addition to Spencer's target were injured.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - In a case that could strengthen truth-in-labeling laws, Supreme Court justices on Monday voiced deep skepticism about Coca-Cola's Pomegranate Blueberry juice that is 99.4% apple and grape juice, saying the name would probably fool most consumers, including themselves. The high court is hearing an appeal from Stewart and Lynda Resnick of Los Angeles, makers of a rival pomegranate juice called Pom Wonderful, who complained that the name of the Coca-Cola product, sold under the Minute Maid brand, is false and misleading.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. said Monday that the Justice Department will announce new clemency criteria aimed at freeing potentially thousands of prisoners convicted of using crack cocaine. To prepare for the expected flood of petitions, the Justice Department is planning to assign dozens of new lawyers to its small pardon attorney's office, Holder said. Holder made the announcement in his weekly video message , a relatively new feature apparently designed to get the attorney general additional news exposure.
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