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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty, according to records and interviews. An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.
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NATIONAL
April 10, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
Albuquerque police have used deadly force more often than necessary, resulting in a series of unjustified fatal shootings by officers, according to a damning report released Thursday by the U.S. Justice Department. Acting Assistant Atty. Gen. Jocelyn Samuels said the Albuquerque Police Department needed a "systematic change" to address a long-ingrained culture of using deadly force - a culture the report called indifferent to operating within constitutional guidelines. "This is no longer an acceptable way to proceed," Samuels said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2009 | By Jack Leonard
A former security guard accused of fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student in a Palmdale parking lot nearly a decade ago was convicted of murder Friday, authorities said. The verdict caps a lengthy legal saga that began when Raymond Lee Jennings first reported finding Michelle O'Keefe's body during a routine patrol of the park-and-ride lot. Investigators found the victim, a student at Antelope Valley College, slumped in the front seat of her Ford Mustang. She had been shot four times in the chest and face.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton and Timothy M. Phelps
If you're not investigating high-speed stock trading, you're missing one of the hottest trends on Wall Street. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. announced Friday that the Justice Department is examining high-frequency trading for possible violations of antitrust and insider-trading laws. When Justice Department investigators visit companies, they may bump into their compatriots from other state and federal agencies. The FBI disclosed this week that it is in the middle of a months-long probe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1995
Justice in America has one color: green. Marcel MATHEVET-FEMLING Costa Mesa
OPINION
November 10, 2013
Re "Trigger the 'nuclear option,'" Editorial, Nov. 1 The Times is correct: Senate Republicans have promiscuously deployed the filibuster in the judicial confirmation process, exacerbating the confirmation wars. The casualties are exceptional attorneys, including Patricia Millett, the nominee to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The D.C. Circuit lacks the resources it needs to deliver justice. Elections do indeed have consequences, and the GOP seems to be practicing a type of nullification when it blocks nominees like Millett for no persuasive reason.
OPINION
November 7, 2012
Re "Teen in girl's slaying to be tried as adult," Oct. 31 Austin Reed Sigg, 17, is accused of committing a horrendous crime, and he should pay the price if convicted. This is not denied. What is difficult here are our inconsistent laws that allow some minors to be tried and treated as adults in a court of law. Yet while they can be treated as adults in courts of law, they cannot have the rights of adults - namely the right to vote, to smoke, to consume alcohol and to be contractually obligated.
OPINION
January 13, 2013
Re "Brown's budget maps out major changes," Jan. 10 Gov. Jerry Brown's proposal to cut the budget for the state courts by an additional $200 million is sad news for California. The cuts that have already taken place have severely impacted the ability of the courts to provide basic services to those seeking justice. The governor and the Legislature have forgotten that the judiciary is a co-equal branch of government with a rightful claim to adequate funding. California arguably once had the finest court system in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2014 | By Marisa Gerber
When Tina Kinser showed up at the Fullerton police station Saturday morning she had a flashback to the summer of 2011. Almost everything seemed the same. The demands for justice blaring out of bullhorns. The people holding signs with pictures of her brother's bloodied face. And the way the crowd of protesters swelled so big it spilled onto Commonwealth Avenue. "It looks just like the protest I came to two years ago," said Kinser, the youngest sister of Kelly Thomas, the homeless man with schizophrenia who died after being beaten unconscious by Fullerton police officers.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
On Wednesday, conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court continued their project of undermining reasonable attempts by Congress to limit the corrupting influence of money in election campaigns. The same 5-4 majority that lifted limits on corporate political spending in the Citizens United decision struck down long-standing limits on the total amount a citizen can donate during an election cycle. As in Citizens United, the majority held that the restrictions violated 1st Amendment protections for political speech.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court sounded ready Monday to curtail the use of certain business patents in a case involving a patent for a computerized risk analysis of international financial transactions. Use of such business-method patents has soared in recent decades. Once granted, they can give a firm or a person a monopoly for up to 20 years to profit from the patented process. Critics say many of the recent computer-related patents are vague and stifle innovation by giving exclusive rights to commonly used methods or formulas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | Corina Knoll
She spent three decades in prison as the outside world moved on. Her children aged. Grandchildren were born. Friends passed away. Mary Virginia Jones, who was serving life without parole for murder, did not despair. She told visitors not to cry. An ordained minister, she preached to dozens every week at the interfaith chapel. She directed Bible services, led hymns and was sought out by those who asked for spiritual guidance. They called her "Mother Mary. " On Monday, she walked into a Los Angeles courtroom in a blue jumpsuit, her hands shackled behind her, her gray hair pulled into a taut bun. The 74-year-old calmly sat down and smiled at her attorneys.
OPINION
March 19, 2014
Re "Much depends on Ginsburg," Opinion, March 16 As a lawyer and an Irvine resident, I respect and commend Erwin Chemerinsky for what he's done as the founding dean of the UC Irvine Law School. But he's wrong to say that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg should resign soon so President Obama can put someone like her on the court. No one currently on the court is as intelligent and respectful of the Constitution as Ginsburg. Her opinions and dissents are based on the law and articulated so as to make her a stalwart defender of the rights of all people, not just those with money and power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
California Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye told the Legislature on Monday that the closure of budget-strapped courts has deprived more than 2 million residents of accessible justice and left the state on the verge of a "civil rights crisis. " "A one-way, three-hour trip to a courthouse can't be fair in anyone's book," Cantil-Sakauye said in her annual address to state lawmakers. California court budgets in the last several years have been cut by about $1 billion, and Cantil-Sakauye has been pleading with legislators to restore more funding next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
California Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye warned Monday that the closure of budget-strapped courts has deprived more than 2 million residents of accessible justice and left the state “on the verge of a civil rights crisis.” "A three-hour drive to the nearest courthouse can't be fair in anyone's book,” Cantil-Sakauye planned to tell state lawmakers Thursday, according to a text of her speech released in advance. California courts in the last several years have been cut by about $1 billion, and Cantil-Sakauye has been pleading with legislators to restore more funding next year.
OPINION
March 15, 2014 | By Erwin Chemerinsky
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg should retire from the Supreme Court after the completion of the current term in June. She turned 81 on Saturday and by all accounts she is healthy and physically and mentally able to continue. But only by resigning this summer can she ensure that a Democratic president will be able to choose a successor who shares her views and values. A great deal turns on who picks Ginsburg's successor. There are, for example, four likely votes to overturn Roe vs. Wade on the current court: Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justices Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas, and Samuel A. Alito Jr. If a Republican president selects Ginsburg's replacement, that justice easily could be the fifth vote needed to allow the government to prohibit all abortions.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The U.S. Justice Department used faulty statistics to overstate its mortgage-fraud prosecution efforts and ranked mortgage-fraud last in its list of priorities despite public pledges to combat these types of crimes, an internal watchdog said Thursday.  The 52-page report by the Justice Department's inspector general found that for the fiscal years of 2009 through 2011, the federal law enforcement agency's effort to prosecute mortgage fraud...
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