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WORLD
March 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan condemned a bid by state prosecutors to shut down his ruling Justice and Development Party as an attack on democracy and political stability and vowed to resist it. A state prosecutor asked the Constitutional Court on Friday to disband the Justice and Development Party because he said it was trying to destroy secularism and turn Turkey into an Islamic state. He also sought to ban Erdogan, President Abdullah Gul and scores of other party officials from politics for five years, a move that drew criticism from the European Union, which the Turkish government aims to join.
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WORLD
August 5, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
ANTAKYA, Turkey--Turkey's former military chief was sentenced to life in prison on Monday, convicted along with many others of trying to overthrow the government of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Retired Gen. Ilker Basbug was the highest profile person among the 275 defendants, which included other military officers, politicians, academics and journalists, Turkish media reported. The trial, which has gone on for five years, was seen as a battleground case in the conflict between Erdogan's Islamist political party and Turkey's secularist establishment.
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OPINION
April 4, 2009 | Jack Miles, Jack Miles is professor of English and religious studies at UC Irvine and senior fellow for religion and international relations at the Pacific Council on International Policy.
"They say we are at war with Islam. This is the whispered line of the extremist who has nothing to offer in this battle of ideas but blame. ... We are not at war with Islam. But too often since 9/11, the extremists have defined us. ... When I am president, that will change." -- Barack Obama, August 2007 -- When President Obama addresses the Turkish parliament on Monday, he will have the chance to fulfill a campaign promise.
WORLD
June 13, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
No pressing matter of state like the economy or foreign policy compelled Alayrettin Ayyaldiz to head to a polling station in his modest Istanbul neighborhood Sunday and cast his ballot for Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's Justice and Development Party. It was a vote of faith and emotion. "We're totally connected with our hearts to the AKP," said the 38-year-old vegetable and fruit vendor, referring to the party's acronym. "It's not about what they do. It's because we love them.
OPINION
February 27, 2010
The Turkish military has long served as the guardian of secular rule in Ankara, even when it meant staging a coup to do so. Turkey's elected Islamist-based government, meanwhile, has sought to subordinate the military to civilian rule as befits a democratic country, although perhaps not always by the purest means. Now, that simmering conflict has become a crisis, with police detaining about 50 senior military figures, 20 of whom have been charged in an alleged 2003 plot to overthrow the government.
WORLD
August 5, 2013 | By Raja Abdulrahim
ANTAKYA, Turkey--Turkey's former military chief was sentenced to life in prison on Monday, convicted along with many others of trying to overthrow the government of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Retired Gen. Ilker Basbug was the highest profile person among the 275 defendants, which included other military officers, politicians, academics and journalists, Turkish media reported. The trial, which has gone on for five years, was seen as a battleground case in the conflict between Erdogan's Islamist political party and Turkey's secularist establishment.
WORLD
April 25, 2007 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
The ruling party on Tuesday chose Foreign Minister Abdullah Gul as its presidential candidate, heading off a potential political confrontation that had starkly illustrated the split between religious and secular Turks. Turkey's more Islamist-minded prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, also had weighed a run for the post, drawing sharp protests from the country's establishment, including the army and the outgoing president.
WORLD
June 12, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Millions of Turkish voters headed to the polls Sunday for critical parliamentary elections that will likely shape the country's constitution, its conflict with a restive Kurdish ethnic minority and its definition of citizenship. But judging from the gigantic billboards looming from highways and buildings throughout the country, the elections are really about whether Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan should be crowned Turkey's leader for the next 12 years. "Ready 2023," the billboards say, referring to the year marking the 100th anniversary of the Turkish republic as well as, coincidentally, how long the ambitious and presumptuous Erdogan may stay in power, if he succeeds in changing Turkey from a parliamentary to a presidential system.
WORLD
June 13, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
No pressing matter of state like the economy or foreign policy compelled Alayrettin Ayyaldiz to head to a polling station in his modest Istanbul neighborhood Sunday and cast his ballot for Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's Justice and Development Party. It was a vote of faith and emotion. "We're totally connected with our hearts to the AKP," said the 38-year-old vegetable and fruit vendor, referring to the party's acronym. "It's not about what they do. It's because we love them.
WORLD
December 27, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Turkey's parliament voted to amend the constitution to clear the way for ruling party leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan to run in a by-election as a step toward becoming prime minister. Because of a conviction in 1998 for inciting religious hatred, Erdogan was banned from running in a Nov. 3 election, in which his Justice and Development Party won a landslide. A previous constitutional change was vetoed by President Ahmet Necdet Sezer.
WORLD
June 12, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Millions of Turkish voters headed to the polls Sunday for critical parliamentary elections that will likely shape the country's constitution, its conflict with a restive Kurdish ethnic minority and its definition of citizenship. But judging from the gigantic billboards looming from highways and buildings throughout the country, the elections are really about whether Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan should be crowned Turkey's leader for the next 12 years. "Ready 2023," the billboards say, referring to the year marking the 100th anniversary of the Turkish republic as well as, coincidentally, how long the ambitious and presumptuous Erdogan may stay in power, if he succeeds in changing Turkey from a parliamentary to a presidential system.
OPINION
February 27, 2010
The Turkish military has long served as the guardian of secular rule in Ankara, even when it meant staging a coup to do so. Turkey's elected Islamist-based government, meanwhile, has sought to subordinate the military to civilian rule as befits a democratic country, although perhaps not always by the purest means. Now, that simmering conflict has become a crisis, with police detaining about 50 senior military figures, 20 of whom have been charged in an alleged 2003 plot to overthrow the government.
OPINION
April 4, 2009 | Jack Miles, Jack Miles is professor of English and religious studies at UC Irvine and senior fellow for religion and international relations at the Pacific Council on International Policy.
"They say we are at war with Islam. This is the whispered line of the extremist who has nothing to offer in this battle of ideas but blame. ... We are not at war with Islam. But too often since 9/11, the extremists have defined us. ... When I am president, that will change." -- Barack Obama, August 2007 -- When President Obama addresses the Turkish parliament on Monday, he will have the chance to fulfill a campaign promise.
WORLD
March 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan condemned a bid by state prosecutors to shut down his ruling Justice and Development Party as an attack on democracy and political stability and vowed to resist it. A state prosecutor asked the Constitutional Court on Friday to disband the Justice and Development Party because he said it was trying to destroy secularism and turn Turkey into an Islamic state. He also sought to ban Erdogan, President Abdullah Gul and scores of other party officials from politics for five years, a move that drew criticism from the European Union, which the Turkish government aims to join.
WORLD
April 25, 2007 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
The ruling party on Tuesday chose Foreign Minister Abdullah Gul as its presidential candidate, heading off a potential political confrontation that had starkly illustrated the split between religious and secular Turks. Turkey's more Islamist-minded prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, also had weighed a run for the post, drawing sharp protests from the country's establishment, including the army and the outgoing president.
WORLD
May 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Turkey's main opposition Republican People's Party and the small Democratic Left Party agreed to contest July's election together, in a move they hope will help unseat the Islamist-rooted government. The former has 151 seats in the outgoing parliament, second only to the ruling center-right Justice and Development Party of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The leftist party has no deputies in parliament now.
WORLD
September 8, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Morocco began counting votes after a record low turnout in parliamentary elections that were expected to show gains for Islamists pressing an anti-corruption message. Political analysts say the moderate Islamist Justice and Development Party has a chance of winning Cabinet posts if it emerges as the party with the most seats. The party emphasizes conservative values and ethics, a message popular in lower-income urban suburbs.
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