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Justice Antonin Scalia

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NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Justice Antonin Scalia earned his reputation as the Supreme Court's most outspoken conservative with sharp one-liners in his opinions and sarcastic cracks in the courtroom. When a government lawyer defending campaign funding laws raised the specter this week of million-dollar checks flowing to congressional campaigns, Scalia was unmoved. “I don't think $3.5 million is a heck of a lot of money,” he said, since billions are spent on national campaigns. This week, he also sounded off on the pope, the devil and the Gipper as well homosexuals, as he referred to them, and the “shrilly liberal” news media.
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NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Justice Antonin Scalia earned his reputation as the Supreme Court's most outspoken conservative with sharp one-liners in his opinions and sarcastic cracks in the courtroom. When a government lawyer defending campaign funding laws raised the specter this week of million-dollar checks flowing to congressional campaigns, Scalia was unmoved. “I don't think $3.5 million is a heck of a lot of money,” he said, since billions are spent on national campaigns. This week, he also sounded off on the pope, the devil and the Gipper as well homosexuals, as he referred to them, and the “shrilly liberal” news media.
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NATIONAL
December 11, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Confronted by a gay student at Princeton University, Justice Antonin Scalia defended his writings comparing laws against homosexuality to those prohibiting bestiality and murder, saying he was arguing that many laws are based on society's moral feelings. "If we cannot have moral feelings against homosexuality, can we have it against murder?" Scalia asked in response to a question. "Can we have it against other things? I don't apologize for the things I raise. " Scalia said he was not equating homosexual conduct with bestiality or murder.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Justice Antonin Scalia sat for a revealing interview with New York Magazine that is being variously described as “weird,” “bizarro” and proof that Scalia is a terrible man. A lot of what Scalia has to say won't come as a surprise to anyone who has followed his career or read his opinions. He thinks that not every stupid law is unconstitutional. He believes the Constitution should be interpreted according to its original meaning. He's adamant that he was right not to sit out a case involving his duck-hunting buddy Dick Cheney.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Jim Newton
American Original The Life and Constitution of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia Joan Biskupic Sarah Crichton Books/Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 436 pp., $28 To begin, a few snapshots from the life of Justice Antonin Scalia: As a young boy, he failed the entrance exam to a prestigious high school. Six decades later, he's still kicking himself over a question he got wrong. He was passed over by Princeton. He was passed over again by President Ronald Reagan for solicitor general, and yet again by President George W. Bush for chief justice.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Associated Press and the Hattiesburg American newspaper filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Marshals Service over an April 7 incident in which a federal marshal erased reporters' recordings of a speech given by Justice Antonin Scalia. A spokesman for the Marshals Service said the agency had not seen the lawsuit. Scalia has apologized for confiscating the recordings.
OPINION
September 12, 2005
Is there no limit to Michael Ramirez's nonsense? Not only does he treat us to his sports illiteracy by combining a baseball analogy with an image of football players, he represents Justice Clarence Thomas as a legal heavyweight instead of what he is: Justice Antonin Scalia's second vote (editorial cartoon, Opinion, Sept. 8). KEN FELDMAN Chino Hills I'm guessing it wasn't the intent of Ramirez's cartoon, but it accurately characterizes Scalia and Thomas as the small-minded pinheads they are. PATRICK R. PIERES Simi Valley
NATIONAL
March 2, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Supreme Court said it referred to Justice Antonin Scalia a request that he remove himself from a case about Vice President Dick Cheney's energy task force because their recent duck-hunting trip raised questions about his impartiality. The Sierra Club environmental group filed a motion last week asking that Scalia disqualify himself from the case because the January trip had created "an appearance of impropriety."
OPINION
February 21, 2004
Regarding "Old MacDonald Had a Judge ... " (Commentary, Feb. 17), about Justice Antonin Scalia refusing to recuse himself in the case involving Vice President Dick Cheney: Maybe Scalia believes he can be impartial when voting about his friend, and after receiving gratuities like the hunting trip from the companies involved. But then why do I already know exactly how he will vote on the matter? Steve Dillow Torrance Robert Scheer is so right in calling on Scalia to recuse himself in the upcoming case involving Cheney, since they went on a hunting trip together.
OPINION
June 19, 2008
Re "Crossing Obama off the list," letters, June 18 To the women with the brilliant idea that electing John McCain will leave a clear field for Hillary Rodham Clinton in 2012, I have three words: Supreme Court justices. There probably will be at least two openings on the court in the next four years. If McCain gets to fill them with the type of justice he says he admires most, you can say goodbye to Roe vs. Wade, workplace protection laws, equal pay legislation -- and say hello to more government wiretapping and the policy of "guilty unless proven innocent."
NATIONAL
September 28, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Nine years ago, Kevin Ring was a young rising star in conservative legal circles here when he published his first book, "Scalia Dissents," a tribute to Antonin Scalia as the Supreme Court's "wittiest, most outspoken justice. " This week, the former lawyer and lobbyist may well need an assist from the outspoken Scalia if he is to avoid going to federal prison for nearly two years. Ring's last-chance appeal comes before the Supreme Court justices as they meet Monday for an annual fall ritual.
OPINION
September 8, 2013 | By Joseph J. Ellis
There is an opinion abroad in the land that the right to bear arms is unlimited, an absolute right, like the right to vote or the right to a fair trial. This heartfelt conviction has surfaced lately in state legislation that attempts to nullify federal gun regulations. For the nullifiers, and many others, the broadest possible right to bear arms is purportedly enshrined in the 2nd Amendment and recognized in the Supreme Court case Heller vs. District of Columbia. And yet, no matter how prevalent or fervently held, the opinion that the Bill of Rights supports and the high court acknowledges an absolute right to gun ownership is just plain wrong.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Confronted by a gay student at Princeton University, Justice Antonin Scalia defended his writings comparing laws against homosexuality to those prohibiting bestiality and murder, saying he was arguing that many laws are based on society's moral feelings. "If we cannot have moral feelings against homosexuality, can we have it against murder?" Scalia asked in response to a question. "Can we have it against other things? I don't apologize for the things I raise. " Scalia said he was not equating homosexual conduct with bestiality or murder.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Justice Antonin Scalia has never been shy about saying what he thinks and never reluctant to criticize those he disagrees with. For more than a quarter-century, the high court's term has nearly always ended with a rush of opinions in late June and a fiery dissent from Scalia. His colleagues sit with tight expressions or distant gazes as Scalia sounds off, his tone one of anger and disgust. His targets Monday included illegal immigrants and President Obama.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court's most outspoken and combative conservative, is not often described as friendly to criminals. But in recent years, Scalia has led an unusual pro-defendant faction at the high court in reversing convictions for murder, drug dealing, wife beating and drunken driving. Next up in early December is a Chicago rapist who claims his 6th Amendment right to confront his accusers was violated because prosecutors did not put on the witness stand a lab technician from Maryland who conducted the DNA test that sent him to prison.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2011 | By Tom Hamburger, Washington Bureau
A government watchdog group alleges that two of the Supreme Court's most conservative members had a conflict of interest when they considered a controversial case last year that permitted corporate funds to be used directly in political campaigns. Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas are the subjects of an unusual letter delivered Wednesday to the Justice Department by the nonpartisan group Common Cause. The letter asks the department to look into whether the jurists should have disqualified themselves from hearing the campaign finance case if they had participated in a private meeting sponsored by Charles and David Koch, billionaire philanthropists who fund conservative causes.
OPINION
July 5, 2008
Re "A fool for a lawyer," editorial, June 28 Justice Antonin Scalia's recent opinions, including in the Edwards case, reflect his well-known view that when courts read the Constitution, they may look only to the literal meaning of the words and not to the "values behind" those words -- in other words, not to what the Constitution was intended to accomplish. As your editorial says, Scalia's premise for this is that our rights are rooted in our dignity as individuals. But Scalia's dissent in the Edwards case would have resulted in the pathetic spectacle of a mentally ill defendant demonstrably incapable of doing so being allowed to defend himself.
OPINION
March 16, 2004
"Ginsburg Has Ties to Activist Group" (March 11) concerns the association of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg with the NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund. This appears to be nothing more than an association with the group from which she came -- much like the association of Justice Thurgood Marshall with the NAACP. To attempt to equate the legitimate activities of Justice Ginsburg with the very questionable duck hunting trip taken by Vice President Dick Cheney and Justice Antonin Scalia is totally dishonest.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2010 | By Timothy M. Phelps, Tribune Washington Bureau
Social conservatives can usually count Justice Antonin Scalia as a faithful ally on the Supreme Court. But Wednesday, Scalia had only sarcasm for opponents of Washington state's domestic partner law, who wanted to overturn the law through a referendum without having their names made public. "Oh, this is such a touchy-feely, oh so sensitive" point of view, Scalia said. "You know, you can't run a democracy this way, with everybody being afraid of having his political positions known."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Jim Newton
American Original The Life and Constitution of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia Joan Biskupic Sarah Crichton Books/Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 436 pp., $28 To begin, a few snapshots from the life of Justice Antonin Scalia: As a young boy, he failed the entrance exam to a prestigious high school. Six decades later, he's still kicking himself over a question he got wrong. He was passed over by Princeton. He was passed over again by President Ronald Reagan for solicitor general, and yet again by President George W. Bush for chief justice.
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