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NATIONAL
March 12, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The U.S. Justice Department on Monday said Texas' new voter identification law failed to comply with the Voting Rights Act and did not demonstrate that it wouldn't discriminate against minority voters. In a letter to the state, Justice Department officials said the measure could disproportionately harm Latinos. The department blocked a similar law earlier this month in Wisconsin, and in South Carolina in December. Last year, eight states passed voter ID laws. Supporters of such laws, generally Republicans, say the laws protect the integrity of elections.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department announced a new initiative Wednesday to encourage nonviolent prisoners who have served at least 10 years to apply for what is expected to be a large-scale grant of clemency in President Obama's waning years in office. Deputy Atty. Gen. James M. Cole announced that a new pardons attorney would take over a beefed-up office to handle requests that will be actively solicited throughout the federal prison system from thousands of prisoners who meet six criteria.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2012 | By Joe Flint
The Department of Justice has launched a probe into the pay-television business to determine whether cable and satellite operators and programmers are engaging in business practices that, among other things, could derail the emergence of competing broadband distribution services. The wide-ranging examination is looking at such topics as contracts between programmers and distribution companies and how that affects consumers and competitors, and caps on the amount of data that cable subscribers can use for downloads, according to several people familiar with the situation who declined to speak publicly.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
The latest Albuquerque police officer to fatally shoot a suspect was caught in a lie three years ago during the case of another officer implicated in a deadly shooting, according to an attorney and sworn testimony. In 2011, Officer Jeremy Dear told a police investigator that he saw the suspect, Alan Gomez, holding a cigarette and standing in front of his house talking with police, according to federal court records. Gomez was a suspect in a hostage situation and was considered armed.
OPINION
November 6, 2010 | By Samuel T. Morison
The Times' well-intentioned Oct. 30 editorial bemoaning that fact that President Obama hasn't yet granted any pardons or commutations, in which the editorial board correctly notes that the president is "aided in such decisions by the Office of the Pardon Attorney in the Justice Department," betrays a profound misunderstanding of the role the pardon office plays in the clemency advisory process. In particular, The Times writes, "Ideally, presidents would give great deference to the pardon attorney's recommendations and take a liberal view of the clemency power, exercising it often and on the basis of clear standards.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Justice Department officials have announced plans to monitor local elections Saturday in three areas of Texas to ensure compliance with the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Federal observers will monitor polling places in Dallas, Galveston and Jasper counties, according to a Justice Department statement released Friday. “Observers will watch and record activities during voting hours at polling locations in these counties, and Civil Rights Division attorneys will coordinate the federal activities and maintain contact with local election officials,” the statement said.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Federal prosecutors secretly obtained records of telephone calls from more than 20 telephone lines belonging to the Associated Press and its journalists over a two-month period in an apparent investigation of a leak of sensitive information about a terrorist plot in Yemen. The head of the Associated Press lodged a formal complaint Monday with the Department of Justice in Washington, for what he called an “overbroad collection” of telephone records of the wire service's reporters and editors.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Bank of America has lost a major civil fraud case brought by the Justice Department, a major victory for the federal government as it continues to pursue cases stemming from the financial crisis. A federal jury in Manhattan found BofA liable for faulty loans its unit Countrywide Financial Corp. sold to mortgage finance giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The jury also found former Countrywide executive Rebecca Mairone liable, a spokeswoman for U.S. Atty. Preet Bharara said.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Justice Department officials and attorneys general from California and several other states were set Tuesday morning to announce a landmark civil suit against Standard & Poor's Corp. concerning the company's credit ratings of troubled mortgage-backed securities before the financial crisis. U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr., along with California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris, and the attorneys general of Connecticut, Delaware, Mississippi, Illinois and Iowa were scheduled to hold a news conference in Washington at 8:15 a.m. PST. The attorney general of the District of Columbia also was set to appear.
NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department announced a new initiative Wednesday to encourage nonviolent prisoners who have served at least 10 years to apply for what is expected to be a large-scale grant of clemency in President Obama's waning years in office. Deputy Atty. Gen. James M. Cole announced that a new pardons attorney would take over a beefed-up office to handle requests that will be actively solicited throughout the federal prison system from thousands of prisoners who meet six criteria.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
Less than two weeks after federal officials rebuked the Albuquerque Police Department for a rash of unjustified officer-involved shootings, an officer fatally shot a 19-year-old woman suspected of stealing a vehicle before pointing a gun at police, authorities said. Mary Hawkes became the first person to be killed by Albuquerque police since the Justice Department released a scathing report that called for a "systematic change" to address what it said was a long-ingrained culture of deadly force in the Police Department.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. said Monday that the Justice Department will announce new clemency criteria aimed at freeing potentially thousands of prisoners convicted of using crack cocaine. To prepare for the expected flood of petitions, the Justice Department is planning to assign dozens of new lawyers to its small pardon attorney's office, Holder said. Holder made the announcement in his weekly video message , a relatively new feature apparently designed to get the attorney general additional news exposure.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer and Richard A. Serrano
The Justice Department and FBI have opened an investigation of Los Angeles nutritional products company Herbalife Ltd., which has been fighting critics who say it's operating an illegal pyramid scheme. Law enforcement sources confirmed the investigation. The FBI started looking into the company "more than several months ago," said a person who has been briefed on the investigation. "We are doing our job of getting to the bottom of this issue," said the official, who asked not to be identified because the investigation is ongoing.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - A secret Senate report on the CIA's treatment of Al Qaeda detainees from 2001 to 2006 concludes that the spy agency used brutal, unauthorized interrogation techniques, misrepresented key elements of the program to policymakers and the public, and actively sought to undermine congressional oversight, officials who have read the report say. Contrary to previous assertions by President George W. Bush and CIA leaders, the use of harsh interrogation...
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON -- A House committee voted Thursday in favor of holding Lois Lerner, a former Internal Revenue Service official, in contempt of Congress for her refusal to testify before the panel. Lerner, the former head of the IRS's tax-exempt branch, twice appeared in front of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee and declined to respond to questions, citing her 5th Amendment right against self-incrimination. The panel is investigating the IRS's alleged targeting of conservative groups.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
Albuquerque police have used deadly force more often than necessary, resulting in a series of unjustified fatal shootings by officers, according to a damning report released Thursday by the U.S. Justice Department. Acting Assistant Atty. Gen. Jocelyn Samuels said the Albuquerque Police Department needed a "systematic change" to address a long-ingrained culture of using deadly force - a culture the report called indifferent to operating within constitutional guidelines. "This is no longer an acceptable way to proceed," Samuels said.
NATIONAL
July 26, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON -- Eight senior Department of Justice administrative employees should be disciplined for seeking jobs for their children and other relatives, and the department needs to tighten its employment guidelines after three nepotism incidents in recent years, the Inspector General's Office said Thursday. In the latest cases, the inspector general's report determined that within certain departments, a culture of “nepotism, ethical lapses and misleading statements was the result of bad behavior by individuals insufficiently impressed with the principles of fair and open” job hiring competition.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON -- Fourteen federal law enforcement officials -- from field agents in Arizona to top managers in the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and the Justice Department in Washington -- created a "significant danger to public safety" under Operation Fast and Furious , an investigative report found. Those officials still employed were referred for possible job discipline for carrying out the gun-trafficking operation that saturated the Southwest border with more than 2,000 illegally purchased firearms.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Hollywood studios are turning the screws on Kim Dotcom, founder of the once infamous piracy website Megaupload. Several major U.S. studios on Monday filed a lawsuit against Kim Dotcom (a.k.a. Kim Schmitz and Kim Tim Jim Vestor) and others associated with Megaupload, alleging that they encouraged and profited from massive copyright infringement of movies and television shows before they were indicted on federal criminal charges and Megaupload was shut down. “When Megaupload.com was shut down in 2012 by U.S. law enforcement, it was by all estimates the largest and most active infringing website targeting creative content in the world,” said Steven Fabrizio, senior executive vice president and global general counsel of the Motion Picture Assn.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. announced Friday that the Justice Department is investigating the practice of high-speed trading on the stock exchanges. Holder, in testimony prepared for delivery before the House Appropriations Committee, said the Justice Department is investigating the use of computer algorithms and ultra-high-speed data networks to execute trades as a possible violation of antitrust laws. Firms that use such tactics, employing physicists and other scientists to predict changes in the markets sometimes only seconds in advance, have been around for more than three decades.
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