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NATIONAL
March 12, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The U.S. Justice Department on Monday said Texas' new voter identification law failed to comply with the Voting Rights Act and did not demonstrate that it wouldn't discriminate against minority voters. In a letter to the state, Justice Department officials said the measure could disproportionately harm Latinos. The department blocked a similar law earlier this month in Wisconsin, and in South Carolina in December. Last year, eight states passed voter ID laws. Supporters of such laws, generally Republicans, say the laws protect the integrity of elections.
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BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer and Richard A. Serrano
The Justice Department and FBI have opened an investigation of Los Angeles nutritional products company Herbalife Ltd., which has been fighting critics who say it's operating an illegal pyramid scheme. Law enforcement sources confirmed the investigation. The FBI started looking into the company "more than several months ago," said a person who has been briefed on the investigation. "We are doing our job of getting to the bottom of this issue," said the official, who asked not to be identified because the investigation is ongoing.
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NATIONAL
May 11, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Justice Department officials have announced plans to monitor local elections Saturday in three areas of Texas to ensure compliance with the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Federal observers will monitor polling places in Dallas, Galveston and Jasper counties, according to a Justice Department statement released Friday. “Observers will watch and record activities during voting hours at polling locations in these counties, and Civil Rights Division attorneys will coordinate the federal activities and maintain contact with local election officials,” the statement said.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - A secret Senate report on the CIA's treatment of Al Qaeda detainees from 2001 to 2006 concludes that the spy agency used brutal, unauthorized interrogation techniques, misrepresented key elements of the program to policymakers and the public, and actively sought to undermine congressional oversight, officials who have read the report say. Contrary to previous assertions by President George W. Bush and CIA leaders, the use of harsh interrogation...
NEWS
June 2, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - Republicans sharply criticized Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. on Sunday for his handling of an investigation into a possible leak of classified information to a Fox News reporter, suggesting that Holder lied to Congress last month in testifying that he was unaware of any potential prosecutions of journalists. GOP critics said Holder was aware of a search warrant in 2010 for emails from Fox News' James Rosen that called him a possible co-conspirator in the investigation and a risk to flee the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2012 | By Joe Flint
The Department of Justice has launched a probe into the pay-television business to determine whether cable and satellite operators and programmers are engaging in business practices that, among other things, could derail the emergence of competing broadband distribution services. The wide-ranging examination is looking at such topics as contracts between programmers and distribution companies and how that affects consumers and competitors, and caps on the amount of data that cable subscribers can use for downloads, according to several people familiar with the situation who declined to speak publicly.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The Department of Justice is siding with broadcasters in their legal fight against Aereo, the start-up service that streams local television signals to consumers via the Internet. In a brief filed at the Supreme Court on Monday afternoon, the department said Aereo is "clearly infringing" on the copyrights of the broadcasters whose content it is streaming without permission, and said a lower court ruling declaring the service legal should be reversed. Launched in 2012 and available in 13 markets, Aereo plucks the signals of broadcasters and transmits them to the Internet via tiny antennae.
OPINION
November 6, 2010 | By Samuel T. Morison
The Times' well-intentioned Oct. 30 editorial bemoaning that fact that President Obama hasn't yet granted any pardons or commutations, in which the editorial board correctly notes that the president is "aided in such decisions by the Office of the Pardon Attorney in the Justice Department," betrays a profound misunderstanding of the role the pardon office plays in the clemency advisory process. In particular, The Times writes, "Ideally, presidents would give great deference to the pardon attorney's recommendations and take a liberal view of the clemency power, exercising it often and on the basis of clear standards.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Federal prosecutors secretly obtained records of telephone calls from more than 20 telephone lines belonging to the Associated Press and its journalists over a two-month period in an apparent investigation of a leak of sensitive information about a terrorist plot in Yemen. The head of the Associated Press lodged a formal complaint Monday with the Department of Justice in Washington, for what he called an “overbroad collection” of telephone records of the wire service's reporters and editors.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Bank of America has lost a major civil fraud case brought by the Justice Department, a major victory for the federal government as it continues to pursue cases stemming from the financial crisis. A federal jury in Manhattan found BofA liable for faulty loans its unit Countrywide Financial Corp. sold to mortgage finance giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The jury also found former Countrywide executive Rebecca Mairone liable, a spokeswoman for U.S. Atty. Preet Bharara said.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
Albuquerque police have used deadly force more often than necessary, resulting in a series of unjustified fatal shootings by officers, according to a damning report released Thursday by the U.S. Justice Department. Acting Assistant Atty. Gen. Jocelyn Samuels said the Albuquerque Police Department needed a "systematic change" to address a long-ingrained culture of using deadly force - a culture the report called indifferent to operating within constitutional guidelines. "This is no longer an acceptable way to proceed," Samuels said.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton and Timothy M. Phelps
If you're not investigating high-speed stock trading, you're missing one of the hottest trends on Wall Street. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. announced Friday that the Justice Department is examining high-frequency trading for possible violations of antitrust and insider-trading laws. When Justice Department investigators visit companies, they may bump into their compatriots from other state and federal agencies. The FBI disclosed this week that it is in the middle of a months-long probe.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | Tina Susman and Jerry Hirsch
A federal judge ratified the landmark deal in the criminal prosecution of Toyota Motor Corp. over safety defects in its vehicles, but not without a tongue-lashing about the "reprehensible picture" of corporate misconduct the automaker displayed. "Corporate fraud can kill," Judge William H. Pauley III said Thursday as Christopher P. Reynolds, the chief legal officer of Toyota Motor North America, stood silently before him in a lower Manhattan courtroom. "I sincerely hope that this is not the end but only a beginning to seek to hold those individuals responsible for making these decisions accountable," Pauley said.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The U.S. Justice Department used faulty statistics to overstate its mortgage-fraud prosecution efforts and ranked mortgage-fraud last in its list of priorities despite public pledges to combat these types of crimes, an internal watchdog said Thursday.  The 52-page report by the Justice Department's inspector general found that for the fiscal years of 2009 through 2011, the federal law enforcement agency's effort to prosecute mortgage fraud...
NATIONAL
March 12, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. is to endorse a proposal to reduce future drug sentences by an average of 11 months during a hearing by the U.S. Sentencing Commission on Thursday. Overly-tough drug sentences result in “too many Americans going to prison for far too long, and at times for no truly good public safety reason,” Holder said in prepared remarks released by the Justice Department. There are more than 216,000 inmates in federal prisons alone, Holder said, nearly half of them serving time for drug-related crimes.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- The House passed the first of a pair of bills aimed at reining in what Republicans call a pattern of overreach by the executive branch under President Obama . Democrats decried the base-pleasing measure as a political stunt. Immigration reform advocates said it threatens the administration's deferred action deportation program. The legislation is a response to what Republicans say has been an "imperial presidency" under Obama -- a term that one conservative lawmaker noted also fit the Nixon administration during the Watergate scandal.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Justice Department officials and attorneys general from California and several other states were set Tuesday morning to announce a landmark civil suit against Standard & Poor's Corp. concerning the company's credit ratings of troubled mortgage-backed securities before the financial crisis. U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr., along with California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris, and the attorneys general of Connecticut, Delaware, Mississippi, Illinois and Iowa were scheduled to hold a news conference in Washington at 8:15 a.m. PST. The attorney general of the District of Columbia also was set to appear.
NATIONAL
July 26, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON -- Eight senior Department of Justice administrative employees should be disciplined for seeking jobs for their children and other relatives, and the department needs to tighten its employment guidelines after three nepotism incidents in recent years, the Inspector General's Office said Thursday. In the latest cases, the inspector general's report determined that within certain departments, a culture of “nepotism, ethical lapses and misleading statements was the result of bad behavior by individuals insufficiently impressed with the principles of fair and open” job hiring competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before insert funny line here . Oops, did I really do that? The Skinny: I caught some of the British version of "House of Cards " last night and liked it. It felt more gritty and less glamorous than the Netflix version. Also finally watched "Zodiac," which was really great. I know, you come here for news not my viewing habits. Well, we have some big news today. Dish and Disney struck a huge distribution deal and the Department of Justice is on the side of broadcasters in their fight against Aereo.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The Department of Justice is siding with broadcasters in their legal fight against Aereo, the start-up service that streams local television signals to consumers via the Internet. In a brief filed at the Supreme Court on Monday afternoon, the department said Aereo is "clearly infringing" on the copyrights of the broadcasters whose content it is streaming without permission, and said a lower court ruling declaring the service legal should be reversed. Launched in 2012 and available in 13 markets, Aereo plucks the signals of broadcasters and transmits them to the Internet via tiny antennae.
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