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BUSINESS
February 25, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - A Senate subcommittee investigation accused Swiss banking giant Credit Suisse of using elaborate “cloak-and-dagger” methods to hide the accounts of 22,000 wealthy American citizens with a total of up to $12 billion in assets from U.S. authorities so they could avoid paying taxes. The bipartisan probe also sharply criticized the Justice Department for being lax in using subpoenas and other legal tools to pressure the bank to reveal most of the names of account holders, which have been withheld as part of a long Swiss tradition of bank secrecy.
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NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Daniel Rothberg
WASHINGTON -- After a spate of large-scale  cyberattacks  on large retailers, Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. urged Congress to adopt a national standard for notifying consumers of a security breach. Holder said creating such a law would bolster the Justice Department's ability to combat crimes and hold organizations accountable for failing to protect private information. The announcement Monday comes just weeks after lawmakers called for tighter notification standards during congressional hearings into recent commercial  cyberattacks , including high-profile cases at Target Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Joe Flint
The practice of competing local television stations sharing resources needs tougher regulations, the Justice Department warned Friday. In a filing to the Federal Communications Commission, the department said agreements between local television stations to partner on business and editorial operations "often confer influence or control of one broadcast competitor over another. " It added that that such arrangements can also allow broadcasters to circumvent the FCC's rules limiting the number of television stations one company can own. Known in the television industry as joint sales agreements, shared service agreements or local news service agreements, such arrangements have become commonplace, particularly in small and midsize markets.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Michael McGough
Sen. Elizabeth Warren's populist crusade has a new objective: preventing “a corporate capture of the federal courts.” The Massachusetts Democrat and progressive heroine graciously concedes that “there are some really talented judges who came from the private sector.” But she insists that “it matters that someone has represented people other than corporate clients, that they've had real experience with people who can't afford lawyers, that...
NATIONAL
February 8, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON -- In a new milestone for gay rights, Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. will issue a directive Monday expanding government recognition of same-sex marriages to all federal courtrooms and prisons, and some federal benefits programs. The new policy, which Holder plans to announce Saturday night at a gay rights dinner in New York City, means the Justice Department will not object if gay or lesbian partners refuse to testify against their spouses in federal criminal and civil cases, and will push for them to be accorded the same rights in Bankruptcy court as other married couples.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - A former government official pleaded guilty Friday to leaking secret information about North Korea to a Fox News reporter, a case that triggered a controversy last spring over the Justice Department's targeting of journalists who expose classified materials. Stephen Jin-Woo Kim, a State Department intelligence advisor who specialized in weapons of mass destruction, agreed to a sentence of 13 months in prison for disclosing a June 2009 intelligence report about North Korea to Fox's James Rosen.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Twitter is hinting that it will file a lawsuit if it is not allowed to release far more detailed information about requests for information about users it receives from the U.S. government. Twitter is "considering legal options" on 1st Amendment grounds, the company said in a blog post Thursday. Twitter has been pressing the Justice Department to be permitted to release specifics on the number and the type of requests it receives. Facebook, Google, LinkedIn and Microsoft recently reached an agreement with federal officials to disclose broad details about the data requests that they have been secretly complying with under national security orders.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. confirmed the Justice Department is investigating the theft of financial and personal information of 110 million Target customers. In a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Wednesday, Holder said that while the Justice Department doesn't generally discuss specific cases, the department is working to track down and prosecute the hackers who stole Target customer data late last year. “We are committed to working to find not only the perpetrators of these sorts of data breaches but also any individuals and groups who exploit that data via credit card fraud,” Holder said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Target Corp. said cyberthieves stole credentials from one of the retailer's vendors in order to access its system, according to an ongoing forensic investigation into a data breach that may have exposed information from as many as 110 million customers. The company said that since disclosing the hack Dec. 15, it cleared its system of the malware that had been planted. “In addition, since that time we have taken extra precautions such as limiting or updating access to some of our platforms while the investigation continues,” Target spokeswoman Molly Snyder said in a statement Wednesday.
OPINION
January 29, 2014
Re "Fixing the Voting Rights Act," Editorial, Jan. 24 There isn't any legislation needed. The Supreme Court's decision last year was aimed at only one section of the Voting Rights Act; the rest remains in full force. As The Times recognizes, the Justice Department and civil rights groups are now using those other provisions to try to advance their agendas. All that's different is that lawyers have to prove racial discrimination before they can get court relief, which is the way every other civil rights law works.
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