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August 2, 1985
South Korean President Chun Doo Hwan named hard-liners to two important posts in his government party, apparently in preparation for an anticipated clash in the National Assembly this fall with opposition parties seeking greater democracy. Chung Soon Duk, 49, a former brigadier general, was named secretary general of the governing Democratic Justice Party, and Lee Sei Kee, 48, a former professor, as majority floor leader.
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WORLD
October 16, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Mark Magnier
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - A suicide bomber in Pakistan's volatile northwest killed eight people Wednesday, including a powerful provincial minister, and wounded 30 in the latest attack to hit the troubled region near the border with Afghanistan. Israrullah Gandapur, the law and parliamentary affairs minister in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province, was its third lawmaker to be killed since June. Gandapur was hosting more than 500 visitors for the Islamic holiday of Eid al-Adha when the bomber attacked him at his home in the village of Kulachi, said Shah Farman, Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa's information minister.
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NEWS
May 3, 1987 | Associated Press
President Chun Doo Hwan's party charged Saturday that a new opposition party is advocating "violent revolution" and said the government will not tolerate any attempt to undermine its decisions. The Reunification Democratic Party, led by Kim Young Sam and Kim Dae Jung, South Korea's two best-known dissidents, was formally inaugurated Friday. It vowed to fight for democracy and to revive parliamentary debate on a new constitution.
WORLD
July 30, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistani lawmakers elected a longtime stalwart of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's ruling party as the country's new president Tuesday, paving the way for President Asif Ali Zardari's exit when his term ends Sept. 8.   Mamnoon Hussain, 73, will assume a presidency that is for the most part a ceremonial post. During his five years in office, Zardari wielded the most power within the civilian arm of the government not because he was president but because he headed up the ruling party during that time, the Pakistan People's Party (PPP)
WORLD
July 30, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Pakistani lawmakers elected a longtime stalwart of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's ruling party as the country's new president Tuesday, paving the way for President Asif Ali Zardari's exit when his term ends Sept. 8.   Mamnoon Hussain, 73, will assume a presidency that is for the most part a ceremonial post. During his five years in office, Zardari wielded the most power within the civilian arm of the government not because he was president but because he headed up the ruling party during that time, the Pakistan People's Party (PPP)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1988
Opposition politicians charged foul and fraud even before the polls opened for South Korea's National Assembly elections this week, but if the government indeed had it in mind to rig the results its efforts proved remarkably inept. When the ballot counting ended, President Roh Tae Woo's Democratic Justice Party had lost its legislative majority and with it the chance for a more or less free hand in shaping Korean affairs over the next four years.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | From Reuters
Two of South Korea's opposition parties announced Saturday that they will seek an alliance to prepare for local elections later this year. Former presidential candidates Kim Young Sam and Kim Jong Pil, leaders of two of the three opposition parties, said in a joint statement, "We will strengthen our recent friendship and cooperation in seeking to reshape political structure before elections for provincial parliaments."
WORLD
June 22, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
KARACHI, Pakistan - To members of Imran Khan's upstart Movement for Justice party, the assassination of one of their top officials last month here in the nation's largest city sent a blunt message: Welcome to Karachi, where power, armed thugs and turf wars combine to transform politics into blood sport. Zahra Shahid Hussain, who led the women's wing of the party in the southern province of Sindh, had just gotten out of her car in her driveway when two young men pulled up on a motorcycle, a senior Karachi police official said.
WORLD
May 11, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Millions of Pakistanis braved threats from militants and voted Saturday in national elections that marked the country's first democratic transfer of governance and appeared to put former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif on track for a potential return to power. The elections change Pakistan's political landscape and probably will sideline the Pakistan People's Party, which has ruled the country for five years. But the results are not expected to lead to any major shift in U.S.-Pakistan relations because the country's powerful military still holds sway over crucial issues such as Pakistan's role in peace talks with insurgents in Afghanistan and the country's relationship with its nuclear archrival, India.
WORLD
January 23, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
Men in pressed suits and polished shoes, some carrying holy books and sporting beards, rushed past concrete barricades and hurried beneath a silver dome to begin setting laws for a nation that for generations had oppressed and imprisoned many of those now rising to power. Egypt's new parliament held its inaugural session Monday, and a sense of wonder was mixed with the gravity of a country still under military rule and beset by economic turmoil. Dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood, once banned from running for office, the chamber echoed with the raucous voices of a burgeoning political era that is replacing the specter of Hosni Mubarak's corrupt secular government.
WORLD
December 4, 2011 | By Amro Hassan and Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Islamist parties won more than 60% of the vote in the first round of Egypt's parliamentary elections, according to official results reported Sunday by state media. The Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party won 36.6% and the Salafis of the Al Nour party won 24.4% of the 9.7 million votes cast. The Brotherhood's dominance was expected, but the strong showing by the Salafis was a surprise, suggesting Egyptians were heavily influenced by the religious message and grass-roots organization of the Islamists.
WORLD
December 2, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Eager to move beyond the repression and corruption of longtime President Hosni Mubarak's government, Egyptians turned out in unprecedented numbers in the first round of parliamentary elections, authorities announced Friday. Voter turnout in two days of balloting this week was 62%, said Abdul Moez Ibrahim, head of the election commission, who joked that the figure was the highest in any poll "since the pharaohs. " Ibrahim said most races would be decided in runoffs next week.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | From Reuters
Two of South Korea's opposition parties announced Saturday that they will seek an alliance to prepare for local elections later this year. Former presidential candidates Kim Young Sam and Kim Jong Pil, leaders of two of the three opposition parties, said in a joint statement, "We will strengthen our recent friendship and cooperation in seeking to reshape political structure before elections for provincial parliaments."
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | Associated Press
The National Assembly on Saturday rejected President Roh Tae Woo's choice for chief justice, the first such refusal in South Korea's history. It was also the first major test of power in the new, opposition-controlled Parliament. All past Assemblies have been controlled by the governing party. The leadership of the governing Democratic Justice Party, including its chairman Yoon Giel Joong and floor leader Kim Yoon Hwan, offered to resign after the vote. The offer was rejected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1988
Opposition politicians charged foul and fraud even before the polls opened for South Korea's National Assembly elections this week, but if the government indeed had it in mind to rig the results its efforts proved remarkably inept. When the ballot counting ended, President Roh Tae Woo's Democratic Justice Party had lost its legislative majority and with it the chance for a more or less free hand in shaping Korean affairs over the next four years.
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