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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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OPINION
March 15, 2004
Re "Ginsburg Has Ties to Activist Group," March 11: It is gratifying to learn that there is at least one U.S. Supreme Court justice who looks after the welfare of women -- one who can speak to the concerns of the women of our nation. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is an equalizing voice in the important decisions that affect the lives of women. The diversity of the court makes it fair and strong. Lea Petrick Los Olivos
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court upheld Michigan's ban on the use of racial affirmative action in its state universities Tuesday, ruling that voters are entitled to decide the issue. The 6-2 decision clears away constitutional challenges to the state bans on affirmative action, which began in California in 1996. Justice Anthony Kennedy, speaking for the majority, said the democratic process can decide such issues. “This case is not about how the debate about racial preferences should be resolved,” he said.
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NATIONAL
June 7, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Opponents of Chrysler's sale to Fiat are asking the Supreme Court to block the deal. Three Indiana state pension and construction funds filed emergency papers at the high court early today to put the sale on hold so they can pursue an appeal. The federal appeals court in New York approved the sale Friday, but gave objectors until Monday afternoon to try to get the high court to intervene. The emergency request goes first to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who handles such matters from New York.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - This spring marks the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court's decision in New York Times vs. Sullivan, its most important pronouncement on the freedom of the press, but the ruling has not won the acceptance of Justice Antonin Scalia. “It was wrong,” he said Thursday evening at the National Press Club in a joint appearance with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “I think the Framers would have been appalled. … It was revising the Constitution.” The 9-0 ruling handed down in March 1964 threw out a libel suit brought by police commissioner L.B. Sullivan from Montgomery, Ala. He claimed he had been defamed by a paid ad in the New York Times, even though it did not mention him by name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1996
In "New Controversy for the Lone Justice" (May 30), you wrote: "Unlike the other justices, [Clarence] Thomas seldom gets invited to speak at prominent law schools or to teach summer school classes in Europe." In the past three years, the Valparaiso University School of Law has hosted three of the justices in our summer study program in Cambridge, England. In 1993, Justice Antonin Scalia lectured on the separation of powers. In 1994, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lectured on gender-based discrimination.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2013 | By David Savage
Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer broke his shoulder in a fall from his bicycle and underwent surgery Saturday morning, according to a court spokeswoman. The 74-year-old justice was resting comfortably and is expected to be released from Georgetown University Hospital early in the week. Breyer was riding his bike Friday afternoon near the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington, next to the Lincoln Memorial, when he took a fall, according to the statement. He was taken to the hospital by ambulance.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Michael McGough
Civil libertarians are upbeat after an argument in the Supreme Court this week over whether lawyers, activists and academics can challenge the constitutionality of a law authorizing the wiretapping of potential terrorists abroad -- who may be conversing or swapping emails with Americans. The plaintiffs, who carry on confidential conversations with foreign clients and sources, say the law chills them in the exercise of their rights. As is often the case, the civil liberties groups are pinning their hopes on Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who has voted with liberals on the court in previous cases arising from the war on terrorism.  Kennedy seemed receptive to the plaintiffs' argument that they have standing to sue because they fear that their confidential conversations with sources and clients are being monitored.   “I think the lawyer would engage in malpractice if he talked on the telephone with some of these clients, given this statute,” Kennedy told Solicitor General Donald Verrilli.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court announced Monday it was closing its grand front entrance to the arriving public, prompting dissents from two justices who said the open front door was a powerful symbol of equal justice for all. Starting on Tuesday, visitors will not be permitted to walk up the marble steps to enter the building under the facade that says "Equal Justice Under Law." Instead, for security reasons, they will be required to enter a side entrance and go through screening devices.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - This spring marks the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court's decision in New York Times vs. Sullivan, its most important pronouncement on the freedom of the press, but the ruling has not won the acceptance of Justice Antonin Scalia. “It was wrong,” he said Thursday evening at the National Press Club in a joint appearance with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “I think the Framers would have been appalled. … It was revising the Constitution.” The 9-0 ruling handed down in March 1964 threw out a libel suit brought by police commissioner L.B. Sullivan from Montgomery, Ala. He claimed he had been defamed by a paid ad in the New York Times, even though it did not mention him by name.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court upheld Michigan's ban on the use of racial affirmative action in its state universities Tuesday, ruling that voters are entitled to decide the issue. The 6-2 decision clears away constitutional challenges to the state bans on affirmative action, which began in California in 1996. Justice Anthony Kennedy, speaking for the majority, said the democratic process can decide such issues. “This case is not about how the debate about racial preferences should be resolved,” he said.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Outside accountants and lawyers who reveal fraud and wrongdoing at publicly traded companies are protected as whistle-blowers just as employees are, the Supreme Court ruled, expanding the reach of an anti-fraud law passed in the wake of the collapse of companies such as Enron Corp. and WorldCom Inc. The 6-3 decision Tuesday will affect the mutual fund and financial services industries in particular because they rely heavily on outside contractors and advisors. Denying whistle-blower protection to all outside employees of such companies would leave a "huge hole" in the 2002 law, said Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, noting that most mutual fund companies hire independent investment advisors and contractors rather than employees.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before making sure "The Americans" is on my DVR. The Skinny: Very excited that FX's "The Americans" is back Wednesday night. If you're not watching, start. It will easily fill the void left by the shark-jumping "Homeland. " I'm also strangely excited for the rain we're supposed to get. Today's Fix includes a preview of this Sunday's Oscars and a look at the museum the movie academy is building. Also, more stories about the challenges the Dodgers channel is facing getting distributed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Joe Flint
Broadcasters are hoping that the daughter of a Supreme Court justice can help them convince the high court that Aereo -- the start-up service that streams local TV signals via the Internet -- is illegal and needs to be shutdown. In their 65-page briefing filed Monday to the Supreme Court, broadcasters -- including ABC, CBS, NBCUniversal, Fox and Los Angeles Times parent Tribune Co. -- cited work critical of a lower court ruling favoring Aereo by Jane Ginsburg, a professor at Columbia University's School of Law and daughter of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.  In an April 2013 article for the Media Institute that was cited twice, Ginsburg called a ruling in support of Aereo by the U.S. 2nd  Circuit Court of Appeals, a "decision so inconsistent with statutory text and policy as to inspire surmise that the ruling was an April Fool's prank.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Police officers may enter and search a home without a warrant as long as one occupant consents, even if another resident has previously objected, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday in a Los Angeles case. The 6-3 ruling, triggered by a Los Angeles Police Department arrest in 2009, gives authorities more leeway to search homes without obtaining a warrant, even when there is no emergency. The majority, led by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., said police need not take the time to get a magistrate's approval before entering a home in such cases.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Supporters of photo ID requirements for voters are fond of noting that the Supreme Court upheld Indiana's ID law in a 2007 decision written by the then-dean of the court's liberal wing, Justice John Paul Stevens. Now critics of voter ID laws, who portray them as an attempt to suppress the votes of racial minorities and other Democratic-leaning groups, have a comeback. In a new book, the famously prolific Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago writes that “I plead guilty to having written the majority opinion (affirmed by the Supreme Court)
BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
The smart money is saying that at least some Watergate-era campaign finance limits could be struck down by the Supreme Court in a case reminiscent of the 2011 Citizens United disaster. Oral arguments were heard Tuesday in the new case, McCutcheon vs. Federal Election Commission. As we reported earlier , Shaun McCutcheon, the plaintiff, is a conservative Alabama businessman who thinks the existing limits on how much he can donate to political parties and congressional candidates stifle his free speech.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court on Tuesday expanded protections for whistle blowers covered by an anti-fraud law passed following the collapse of energy giant Enron, ruling outside accountants, auditors and lawyers cannot be fired or punished for exposing fraud. The 6-3 decision will have an effect in the mutual fund and financial services industries, the court said, because they rely heavily on outside contractors and advisers. The case before the court arose when two employees of a firm that did research for the Fidelity family of mutual funds revealed the funds were overstating expenses.
NEWS
June 25, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court struck down a key part of the historic Voting Rights Act on Tuesday, ruling that Southern states may no longer be forced to seek federal approval before making changes in their election laws. The ruling came on a 5-4 vote, with Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. speaking for the court. Roberts said the 1965 law had been a “resounding success” and has ensured that blacks now register and vote at the same rate as whites. But he said it was no longer fair or rational to subject these states and municipalities to special scrutiny based on a formula that is more than 40 years old. “States must beseech the federal government for permission to implement laws that they would otherwise have a right to enact and execute on their own,” he wrote.
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