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Justice Stephen G Breyer

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NATIONAL
September 9, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Justice Sonia Sotomayor took her seat at the Supreme Court in front of a packed courtroom that included President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. The ceremony was just for show: Sotomayor and the rest of the court will return today for arguments in a key case about campaign finance law. Sotomayor, 55, last month became the first Latino and third woman to be a justice. She took the oath of office in a ceremony where the court formally welcomes its newest member. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. presented Sotomayor's ivory-colored commission from Obama.
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NATIONAL
May 3, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court announced Monday it was closing its grand front entrance to the arriving public, prompting dissents from two justices who said the open front door was a powerful symbol of equal justice for all. Starting on Tuesday, visitors will not be permitted to walk up the marble steps to enter the building under the facade that says "Equal Justice Under Law." Instead, for security reasons, they will be required to enter a side entrance and go through screening devices.
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OPINION
January 7, 2008
Re "Conservative courts likely Bush legacy," Jan. 2 The Times allows Washington attorney Bradford Berenson to pass along a time-honored but incorrect stereotype about judicial behavior. Berenson claims that conservative justices are less prone to overturn the statutory actions of legislative bodies than are their liberal peers. That is not the case. A study analyzing Supreme Court voting behavior between 1994 and 2005 found that the conservative justices were in fact the most willing to strike down congressional statutes.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2010 | By Timothy M. Phelps, Tribune Washington Bureau
Social conservatives can usually count Justice Antonin Scalia as a faithful ally on the Supreme Court. But Wednesday, Scalia had only sarcasm for opponents of Washington state's domestic partner law, who wanted to overturn the law through a referendum without having their names made public. "Oh, this is such a touchy-feely, oh so sensitive" point of view, Scalia said. "You know, you can't run a democracy this way, with everybody being afraid of having his political positions known."
OPINION
April 2, 2006
Re "Court Appears Wary of Terror War Tribunals," March 29 The Supreme Court heard arguments regarding the legality of President Bush's terror war tribunal. Justice Stephen G. Breyer and others addressed a fundamental flaw in the logic of the Bush administration and its war on terror. The events of Sept. 11 were clearly an attack against the United States; however, the endeavor to effectively respond to this attack is not a "war" in the traditional sense. In Bush's war on terror there are no clearly defined adversaries.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court announced Monday it was closing its grand front entrance to the arriving public, prompting dissents from two justices who said the open front door was a powerful symbol of equal justice for all. Starting on Tuesday, visitors will not be permitted to walk up the marble steps to enter the building under the facade that says "Equal Justice Under Law." Instead, for security reasons, they will be required to enter a side entrance and go through screening devices.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2010 | By David G. Savage
Barre Yousuf, a Somali businessman living in the state of Georgia, spent much of the 1980s in a small, dark and windowless cell in Somalia. "I was tortured with an electric shock and waterboarded," he said. At other times, military police subjected him to what the Somali regime called the "Mig." He was forced to lie on his stomach with his arms and legs tied behind him, while a heavy rock was placed on his back. In this painful position, the victim's body was said to resemble the swept-back wings of a Mig fighter jet. Yousuf recounted his ordeal Wednesday outside the Supreme Court, where the justices for the first time considered whether victims of torture or state-sponsored murder can sue the responsible officials under a 1991 law designed to give victims and family members a chance to get recompense for their suffering.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2009 | Johanna Neuman
The case involved Hillary Clinton (the movie), the future of campaign finance reform and the sanctity of the 1st Amendment guarantee of free speech. Just the usual fodder for a Supreme Court tasked with being the last appeal for all causes, from all corners. There were a few firsts at the hearing Wednesday. Elena Kagan made her first argument at the high court as solicitor general, presenting the government's case that the movie was a campaign ad and therefore subject to regulation by campaign finance laws.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2010 | By Timothy M. Phelps, Tribune Washington Bureau
Social conservatives can usually count Justice Antonin Scalia as a faithful ally on the Supreme Court. But Wednesday, Scalia had only sarcasm for opponents of Washington state's domestic partner law, who wanted to overturn the law through a referendum without having their names made public. "Oh, this is such a touchy-feely, oh so sensitive" point of view, Scalia said. "You know, you can't run a democracy this way, with everybody being afraid of having his political positions known."
NEWS
December 13, 2000
Justice Breyer, with whom Justice Stevens and Justice Ginsburg join except as to Part I-A-1, and with whom Justice Souter joins as to Part I, dissenting. * The court was wrong to take this case. It was wrong to grant a stay. It should now vacate that stay and permit the Florida Supreme Court to decide whether the recount should resume. I The political implications of this case for the country are momentous. But the federal legal questions presented, with one exception, are insubstantial.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2010 | By David G. Savage
Barre Yousuf, a Somali businessman living in the state of Georgia, spent much of the 1980s in a small, dark and windowless cell in Somalia. "I was tortured with an electric shock and waterboarded," he said. At other times, military police subjected him to what the Somali regime called the "Mig." He was forced to lie on his stomach with his arms and legs tied behind him, while a heavy rock was placed on his back. In this painful position, the victim's body was said to resemble the swept-back wings of a Mig fighter jet. Yousuf recounted his ordeal Wednesday outside the Supreme Court, where the justices for the first time considered whether victims of torture or state-sponsored murder can sue the responsible officials under a 1991 law designed to give victims and family members a chance to get recompense for their suffering.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2009 | Johanna Neuman
The case involved Hillary Clinton (the movie), the future of campaign finance reform and the sanctity of the 1st Amendment guarantee of free speech. Just the usual fodder for a Supreme Court tasked with being the last appeal for all causes, from all corners. There were a few firsts at the hearing Wednesday. Elena Kagan made her first argument at the high court as solicitor general, presenting the government's case that the movie was a campaign ad and therefore subject to regulation by campaign finance laws.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Justice Sonia Sotomayor took her seat at the Supreme Court in front of a packed courtroom that included President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden. The ceremony was just for show: Sotomayor and the rest of the court will return today for arguments in a key case about campaign finance law. Sotomayor, 55, last month became the first Latino and third woman to be a justice. She took the oath of office in a ceremony where the court formally welcomes its newest member. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. presented Sotomayor's ivory-colored commission from Obama.
OPINION
January 7, 2008
Re "Conservative courts likely Bush legacy," Jan. 2 The Times allows Washington attorney Bradford Berenson to pass along a time-honored but incorrect stereotype about judicial behavior. Berenson claims that conservative justices are less prone to overturn the statutory actions of legislative bodies than are their liberal peers. That is not the case. A study analyzing Supreme Court voting behavior between 1994 and 2005 found that the conservative justices were in fact the most willing to strike down congressional statutes.
OPINION
April 2, 2006
Re "Court Appears Wary of Terror War Tribunals," March 29 The Supreme Court heard arguments regarding the legality of President Bush's terror war tribunal. Justice Stephen G. Breyer and others addressed a fundamental flaw in the logic of the Bush administration and its war on terror. The events of Sept. 11 were clearly an attack against the United States; however, the endeavor to effectively respond to this attack is not a "war" in the traditional sense. In Bush's war on terror there are no clearly defined adversaries.
NEWS
December 13, 2000
Justice Breyer, with whom Justice Stevens and Justice Ginsburg join except as to Part I-A-1, and with whom Justice Souter joins as to Part I, dissenting. * The court was wrong to take this case. It was wrong to grant a stay. It should now vacate that stay and permit the Florida Supreme Court to decide whether the recount should resume. I The political implications of this case for the country are momentous. But the federal legal questions presented, with one exception, are insubstantial.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Mandatory minimum sentences passed by Congress are "bad policy" because they are unfair in some cases, Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer said. Breyer, a member of the U.S. Sentencing Commission in the 1980s, said there must be flexibility for exceptional cases. In a speech to about 550 people in Boston, Breyer said Congress had passed statutes with "no room for flexibility on the downside."
NEWS
September 3, 1994 | From Associated Press
Harold LaMont Otey, convicted of raping a woman, beating her with a hammer and stabbing her to death, was executed early Friday in Nebraska's first execution in 35 years. Otey, 43, died in the electric chair for the 1977 rape and murder of Jane McManus of Omaha. Otey initially confessed to killing McManus, 26, who had been stabbed 15 times and beaten in her home. He later recanted. In his confession to police, Otey said he killed McManus in a panic after she confronted him during a robbery.
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