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NEWS
July 10, 1988
In its first primary election ever, Argentina's opposition Peronist party chose a flamboyant populist, La Rioja Province Gov. Carlos Menem, as the party's candidate in next year's presidential election. Menem, 58, won 53% of the vote, compared to 46% for Buenos Aires Province Gov. Antonio Cafiero. Both are leaders of the reform movement within the worker-based party founded by the late Juan D. Peron and known formally as the Justicialist Party.
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NEWS
June 13, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Argentine President Raul Alfonsin announced Monday night that he will resign June 30, five months before his term expires, to allow his Peronist successor to begin confronting an unprecedented economic crisis. However, President-elect Carlos Saul Menem indicated early today that he might not accept the quick handover, calling Alfonsin's announcement "surprising." Menem huddled with his Cabinet appointees to discuss Alfonsin's unilateral declaration. In resolving to step down and hand over power to Menem, Alfonsin said that in light of the severe economic problems facing the country, "any delay will bring greater suffering."
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NEWS
May 16, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
The party created by Juan D. Peron in the mid-1940s, which won every Argentine election it was allowed to contest until its drubbing in 1983, has put to rest doubts that Peronism would be able to outlive its charismatic founder. Invoking the memory of Peron and his famous wife Evita, populist Carlos Saul Menem stormed to a stunning victory in the presidential election Sunday. He thus capitalized on disgust with the failure of the ruling Radical Civil Union to arrest Argentina's economic decline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989
Food riots in Argentina, a nation once renown for its prosperity and the self-assurance of its people, are the latest warning signs of the terrible toll being taken throughout Latin America by a prolonged economic crisis. A dozen people died and hundreds were injured and arrested as a result of rioting and looting in several Argentine cities, including some of the poorer suburbs of Buenos Aires, the nation's normally genteel and civilized capital. The riots were apparently sparked by popular frustration at the latest efforts by outgoing President Raul Alfonsin to stem a runaway inflation (estimated at 70% last month alone)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989
Food riots in Argentina, a nation once renown for its prosperity and the self-assurance of its people, are the latest warning signs of the terrible toll being taken throughout Latin America by a prolonged economic crisis. A dozen people died and hundreds were injured and arrested as a result of rioting and looting in several Argentine cities, including some of the poorer suburbs of Buenos Aires, the nation's normally genteel and civilized capital. The riots were apparently sparked by popular frustration at the latest efforts by outgoing President Raul Alfonsin to stem a runaway inflation (estimated at 70% last month alone)
NEWS
June 13, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Argentine President Raul Alfonsin announced Monday night that he will resign June 30, five months before his term expires, to allow his Peronist successor to begin confronting an unprecedented economic crisis. However, President-elect Carlos Saul Menem indicated early today that he might not accept the quick handover, calling Alfonsin's announcement "surprising." Menem huddled with his Cabinet appointees to discuss Alfonsin's unilateral declaration. In resolving to step down and hand over power to Menem, Alfonsin said that in light of the severe economic problems facing the country, "any delay will bring greater suffering."
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
To his most ardent critics in Argentina, Peronist candidate Carlos Saul Menem was a Pied Piper offering vague promises and preying on the desperation of a people facing social and economic ruin. Yet in the week since he won the presidency with an enticing mixture of charisma and fervor, even skeptics admit that Menem has earned a rare degree of public good will in a fractious, jaded country. Although under Argentina's constitution he won't take office for seven months, Menem now faces fierce pressure to explain not only his vision for the country, but also how he plans to achieve it. Referring to his campaign slogan, "Follow Me," many are asking: Where to?
NEWS
February 27, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
The resurgent Peronist party, seeing the presidency within its grasp, has endorsed a moderate campaign platform, abandoning the party's long-held conviction that the state should dominate the national economy. Flamboyant Peronist candidate Carlos Saul Menem spoke in a weekend interview with the restraint and confidence of a front runner who is convinced that he needs merely to avoid major gaffes to win the May 14 election.
NEWS
February 22, 1985 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Confronted by a bitter internal struggle among her erstwhile followers, the last of the Perons has apparently bowed out of Argentine politics. Leaders of of two Peronist feuding factions said Thursday that they have received a handwritten letter from Maria Estela Peron announcing her "irrevocable resignation" as leader of the diffuse, labor-based political movement founded more than 40 years ago by her late husband, Juan D. Peron. Written from her self-imposed exile in Madrid on Feb.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | Reuters
Sen. Eduardo Menem, brother of Argentine President Carlos Saul Menem, has become the effective leader of the ruling Justicialist (Peronist) Party after becoming its vice president Friday night, party sources said Saturday. Although Carlos Saul Menem was chosen party president by the national council, he accepted the position in name only, saying he cannot take a leading role in internal party affairs while being president of the nation.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
To his most ardent critics in Argentina, Peronist candidate Carlos Saul Menem was a Pied Piper offering vague promises and preying on the desperation of a people facing social and economic ruin. Yet in the week since he won the presidency with an enticing mixture of charisma and fervor, even skeptics admit that Menem has earned a rare degree of public good will in a fractious, jaded country. Although under Argentina's constitution he won't take office for seven months, Menem now faces fierce pressure to explain not only his vision for the country, but also how he plans to achieve it. Referring to his campaign slogan, "Follow Me," many are asking: Where to?
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
The party created by Juan D. Peron in the mid-1940s, which won every Argentine election it was allowed to contest until its drubbing in 1983, has put to rest doubts that Peronism would be able to outlive its charismatic founder. Invoking the memory of Peron and his famous wife Evita, populist Carlos Saul Menem stormed to a stunning victory in the presidential election Sunday. He thus capitalized on disgust with the failure of the ruling Radical Civil Union to arrest Argentina's economic decline.
NEWS
February 27, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
The resurgent Peronist party, seeing the presidency within its grasp, has endorsed a moderate campaign platform, abandoning the party's long-held conviction that the state should dominate the national economy. Flamboyant Peronist candidate Carlos Saul Menem spoke in a weekend interview with the restraint and confidence of a front runner who is convinced that he needs merely to avoid major gaffes to win the May 14 election.
NEWS
July 10, 1988
In its first primary election ever, Argentina's opposition Peronist party chose a flamboyant populist, La Rioja Province Gov. Carlos Menem, as the party's candidate in next year's presidential election. Menem, 58, won 53% of the vote, compared to 46% for Buenos Aires Province Gov. Antonio Cafiero. Both are leaders of the reform movement within the worker-based party founded by the late Juan D. Peron and known formally as the Justicialist Party.
NEWS
February 22, 1985 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Confronted by a bitter internal struggle among her erstwhile followers, the last of the Perons has apparently bowed out of Argentine politics. Leaders of of two Peronist feuding factions said Thursday that they have received a handwritten letter from Maria Estela Peron announcing her "irrevocable resignation" as leader of the diffuse, labor-based political movement founded more than 40 years ago by her late husband, Juan D. Peron. Written from her self-imposed exile in Madrid on Feb.
WORLD
May 15, 2003 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Nestor Kirchner, a little-known governor from Argentina's sparsely populated south, became this country's president-elect Wednesday after his rival in the presidential runoff withdrew. Carlos Menem, the two-time president who finished first in a crowded first round of voting last month but trailed badly in the polls for the runoff, officially ended his campaign with a letter signed in his home province, La Rioja.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1989
Argentina's President Raul Alfonsin made a difficult but courageous decision in choosing to resign so that a popularly elected civilian successor can take office earlier than planned. Ever since Alfonsin's Radical Party was overwhelmingly defeated by Peronist candidate Carlos Menem in last month's national election, Argentina has been paralyzed politically. The severe economic crisis that provoked an overwhelming majority of Argentine voters to turn out the Radicals in favor of the Justicialist Party, as the Peronists are officially known, is getting worse, and no one in Alfonsin's government seems capable of coping with it. The seven-month transition period decreed by the nation's constitution left Alfonsin a weak lame duck, blocking Menem from putting populist economic programs into action.
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