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Justification

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NEWS
July 19, 1992
Re "Recalcitrant Employees" (June 26): The case of Darryl Gates is atypical. Civil Service rules provided him an unusual protection, which caused the dilemma the city faced. However, an average employee does not enjoy similar protection. Nor are employers, in general, helpless victims. The ways the employer treats the so-called recalcitrant employee, as writer Roy Rivenburg described, are real. An employee is always in a weaker position than the employer and by and large suffers through miserable working conditions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Ken Dobson, a retired police officer, said he received quite a welcome when he landed his single-engine Cessna in Detroit two days after leaving his home in Palm Desert. Five sheriff's cars surrounded the plane and deputies got out with guns drawn. Then a helicopter arrived with four federal agents and a drug-sniffing dog. They demanded to see Dobson's pilot's license, asked about the flight and mentioned that his long trip from Southern California was suspicious. Fearing he would lose his flight credentials if he didn't cooperate, Dobson consented to a search of his plane.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1988
The sarcastic letter by Ray Kovitz (Dec. 11) about the Nixon Library illustrates complete ignorance as to the purpose and justification for the library. Regardless of one's political views, the purpose of the presidential libraries is to preserve the records of presidents, to make them open to scholars so we may better understand both our national successes and failures, and thereby hopefully not repeat our mistakes. I hope before this century ends that Congress will see fit to release all presidential records of Richard M. Nixon's to the library so that everything that represents the man is in one place.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
The parent company of American Airlines reported a $292-million profit for July, a monthly record for the company that is trying to exit bankruptcy in the next few months. Excluding $57 million in reorganization fees, AMR Corp. reported $349 million in operating profit, according to a monthly filing required by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court. July's profit is the highest for any month in the company's history. In comparison, AMR reported a $357-million profit for the entire second quarter of 2013, the company said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2009
Boilerplate looks like an old stove with legs. He was built by Chicagoan Archibald Campion as the model for a new kind of soldier -- for "preventing the deaths of men in the conflicts of nations." After many exotic adventures around the globe, he disappeared in 1918, during World War I, in the Argonne Forest in northeast France: No piece of wreckage was ever found. Subsequent rumors, though, suggested that the robot had been recovered by the Germans and later rechristened as "Panzermann."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989
Now that the Soviet Union has finally held its first free elections in history, and Nicaragua has apparently agreed to hold elections later this year, what is the United States going to use as justification for its obscenely swollen defense budget? Well, not to fear . . . I'm sure our leaders will come up with some high-minded justification. Or rather, their campaign contributors will. ALAN FENSTER Santa Monica
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1993
The ATF has yet to justify its actions in Waco, Tex. I am no supporter of the Davidians. Yet, with the standoff lasting weeks, no detailed explanation has been given by the ATF concerning why they were there. The Second Amendment is in place to protect the population from the government in power, not from foreign invaders. The ATF claims the justification of a warrant, yet no one has seen or heard the justification for that warrant. Texas gun laws differ from California laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1990
I agree with Father Wood. There is no civilized justification for an execution. Society has the right and duty to protect its members but, based on the preponderance of evidence, executions are not a means to that end. Rather, they are no different from cold-blooded, premeditated murder. Ironically, executions are meted out on individuals at a time when, by virtue of their maximum security incarceration, these individuals have been rendered completely harmless to society. NAIDU PERMAUL Pacific Palisades
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1990
Rather than being shortsighted, as your Nov. 8 editorial claimed, the rejection by Ventura County voters of the half-cent sales tax increase for transit improvements showed 20/20 vision. You can't really believe that two-thirds of us would vote no just to save $50 on $10,000 of taxable purchases; it wasn't for that reason. When I was growing up in the Valley of the '50s and early '60s, I was excited by the new freeways going in. My parents' old home movies show a sky so deep blue you'd think it was Hawaii.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1993
I am disgusted with the editorial about so-called justice ("Justice Gets a Good Mugging," Dec. 5). What you call justice is atavistic vengeance. In all civilized states the only legal justification for the use of deadly force is the imminence of grievous bodily harm or death to yourself or another person you are defending. That is not only the law, it is the only moral justification of the use of deadly force. In some states, New York among them, there is an additional requirement that the defending person "retreat to the utmost" before the use of deadly force.
OPINION
August 19, 2013 | By Jim Sensenbrenner
On Aug. 9, the Obama administration released a previously secret legal interpretation of the Patriot Act that it used to justify the bulk collection of every American's phone records. The strained reasoning in the 22-page memo won't survive long in public light, which is itself one of the strongest arguments for transparency in government. As the late Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis wrote, "Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants. " Recent revelations by the Washington Post emphasize the need for greater transparency.
OPINION
May 29, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Apparently, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer feels she just hasn't yet done enough to tarnish her state's reputation. After defiantly defending SB 1070, the noxious Arizona law that sought to bully immigrants into leaving the state - only to have the U.S. Supreme Court strike down the bulk of it - she is now waging a new fight against immigrants. Brewer is back in federal court, this time defending her 2012 executive order denying driver's licenses to young immigrants who have been granted temporary protection from deportation by the Obama administration.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Carla Hall
Just when you thought Saudi Arabia might be edging its way into the 21 st century - or even the late 20 th - the country's sports minister dispelled that notion with the disappointing and troubling announcement that no women will officially represent the country at the 2012 Olympics.  Only last week, Prince Nayef ibn Abdulaziz had said women could represent Saudi Arabia as long as their participation did not conflict with Islamic laws....
OPINION
March 7, 2012
Not too many debates were settled Monday when U.S. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. detailed the Obama administration's decision-making process on targeted killings. Critics were left with as many questions as before, while supporters had a few more things to cheer about. For our part, we're as troubled as ever by drone-based assassinations - and perhaps more concerned that this nation is heading down a dangerous path. The debates, in large part, are about priorities: At what point does the threat of a terrorist attack justify bypassing constitutional guarantees of due process, not to mention international law?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Write
U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Jay S. Bybee accepted more than $3.2 million in free legal services from a Los Angeles-based firm to fight allegations of ethics violations for providing the Bush administration legal justification to use harsh interrogation tactics that critics called torture, his financial disclosure reports reveal. In his latest report to the Administrative Office of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2011 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
When it's completed this fall, Riverside's Hillcrest High School will be a high-tech academic hub with wireless Internet, a robotics lab, digital smart boards in every classroom and a first-rate performance hall worthy of any "Glee" hopeful. But no students. Sapped by state budget cuts, the Alvord Unified School District doesn't have the money to turn on the lights or hire staff for the $105-million campus. There's no guarantee it will open in 2012-13, despite being built specifically to relieve the packed classrooms in the district's other high schools.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2003
California's attorney general should not be playing politics with California's food supply ("Grocers, Lockyer in Late Talks Over Mutual-Aid Probe," Dec. 23). The attorney general's investigation of the stores has no justification but to benefit the unions, which have supported Lockyer in many elections. Why isn't Lockyer investigating cooperative pacts among the different union organizations? The attorney general should be protecting the consuming public, not his political supporters.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2008
Acoustic lineup: KROQ-FM (106.7) will announce today the lineup for the first night of its 18th annual Almost Acoustic Christmas concert on Dec. 13, with headliners the Offspring, Stone Temple Pilots, Staind and AFI. Tickets will go on sale soon for the show at the Gibson Amphitheatre. Settlement: Harold B. Nelson, the former head of the Long Beach Museum of Art who alleged he was fired without justification, settled his lawsuit against the museum's foundation, court papers show. The deal came Tuesday as the case was set to go to trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2011 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
Approximately 1,000 Los Angeles city parking citations over a two-year period were dismissed — some without justification — through an obscure service known as the "Gold Card Desk" that allows the mayor and other elected officials to fast-track citation reviews, a new audit has found. The service, which few outside of city government appear to know about, partly involves a plastic parking bureau "Gold Card" that is distributed to city offices. It includes a special phone number to call and on the back side notes that the holder may have an "urgent need to resolve any parking citation matter which requires special attention.
NEWS
December 21, 2010 | By Noam N. Levey, Los Angeles Times
Pushing to restrain skyrocketing health insurance premiums, the Obama administration Tuesday set out new rules requiring insurers to justify any increase of more than 10% a year. And administration officials outlined new efforts to increase federal review of premiums if state regulators do not have the capacity to protect consumers. "Year after year, insurance company profits soar, while Americans pay more for less healthcare coverage," Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius said Tuesday in announcing the regulation, which was authorized by the new healthcare law President Obama signed in March.
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