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Justin Kaplan

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Justin Kaplan, an author and cultural historian who wrote a definitive, Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Mark Twain and spiced the popular canon as general editor of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, has died. He was 88. Kaplan died Sunday at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Mass. He had been suffering for years from Parkinson's disease, said his wife, author Anne Bernays. A longtime professor at Harvard University, Kaplan wrote several acclaimed biographies, notably "Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Justin Kaplan, an author and cultural historian who wrote a definitive, Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Mark Twain and spiced the popular canon as general editor of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, has died. He was 88. Kaplan died Sunday at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Mass. He had been suffering for years from Parkinson's disease, said his wife, author Anne Bernays. A longtime professor at Harvard University, Kaplan wrote several acclaimed biographies, notably "Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain.
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NEWS
October 16, 1992 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER and No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. and --Eleanor Roosevelt
Wrong, Eleanor. A quick chat with Justin Kaplan could send even the smuggest semanticist into what Matthew Arnold called "an iron time of doubt." This man has read everything and everyone. Kaplan, editor of the 16th Edition of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, has spent two years poring over virtually every quotable quote ever written, spoken or sung--with the power to decide what goes in and what stays out of the classic reference book. From Ptahhotpe in 24th Century B.C.
BOOKS
December 15, 2002 | Frederic Raphael, Frederic Raphael is the author, most recently, of "Personal Terms," edited notebooks, 1950-69, and "All His Sons: A Novella and Nine Stories."
John Bartlett (1820-1905) was a pioneer in the now well-plowed field of reference books. Although a native of Cambridge, Mass., he found the great majority of his quotations in what was then called English (today it has to be "British") literature. In preferring favorite passages from longer works to sayings or quips, Bartlett anticipated Gertrude Stein's "Remarks are not literature" (itself a remark, of course).
BOOKS
March 23, 1997 | THOMAS MALLON, Thomas Mallon is the author of "A Book of One's Own," a study of diaries. His novel, "Dewey Defeats Truman" (Pantheon), was recently published
In all the accounts of those grotesque baby beauty pageants inflicted on JonBenet Ramsey, I have yet to see any suggestion that the abuse of this child began the moment she was named. "JonBenet," with its ridiculous central capital, was cobbled together from the first and middle names (John Bennett) of her father. At that instant, it seems to me, this little girl became the ego trip of her parents, fit for parading instead of for living anything close to an actual childhood.
BOOKS
July 21, 2002 | DAN WAKEFIELD, Dan Wakefield is the author of the memoir "New York in the 50s," which was the basis of a documentary film of the same name.
At the 35th reunion of the Columbia College class of 1955, Rabbi Harold Kushner told his classmates that there were shelves and shelves of books on the '60s in any library, but only a few, if any, volumes about our own decade, the '50s. We were dismissed as "The Silent Generation," part of the boring "Eisenhower Age," descriptions that the late Meg Greenfield once called "a sort of a libel" on a decade she believed was "badly researched and badly reported."
BOOKS
December 15, 2002 | Frederic Raphael, Frederic Raphael is the author, most recently, of "Personal Terms," edited notebooks, 1950-69, and "All His Sons: A Novella and Nine Stories."
John Bartlett (1820-1905) was a pioneer in the now well-plowed field of reference books. Although a native of Cambridge, Mass., he found the great majority of his quotations in what was then called English (today it has to be "British") literature. In preferring favorite passages from longer works to sayings or quips, Bartlett anticipated Gertrude Stein's "Remarks are not literature" (itself a remark, of course).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1985 | From United Press International
Composer-conductor Leonard Bernstein has been honored by the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters with its 1985 gold medal for distinguished achievement in music. Writer Robert Penn Warren received the gold medal for distinguished achievement in poetry. Novelists Norman Mailer and Erskine Caldwell were elected to the academy and biographer Justin Kaplan, novelist Elizabeth Spencer and composers George Rochberg and Charles Wuorinen became members of the institute. Sen.
NEWS
May 11, 1998 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Merriam-Webster defines the word "nigger" as, simply, a "black person." Not so, says an ad hoc coalition of civil rights and black activists, who argue that the "N-word" actually is a defamatory slur associated with black people--not a broadly sweeping noun synonymous with them. This sort of etymological debate typically rages within a self-contained community of wordsmiths laboring unseen and little noticed on college campuses or at major publishing houses.
BOOKS
July 21, 2002 | DAN WAKEFIELD, Dan Wakefield is the author of the memoir "New York in the 50s," which was the basis of a documentary film of the same name.
At the 35th reunion of the Columbia College class of 1955, Rabbi Harold Kushner told his classmates that there were shelves and shelves of books on the '60s in any library, but only a few, if any, volumes about our own decade, the '50s. We were dismissed as "The Silent Generation," part of the boring "Eisenhower Age," descriptions that the late Meg Greenfield once called "a sort of a libel" on a decade she believed was "badly researched and badly reported."
BOOKS
March 23, 1997 | THOMAS MALLON, Thomas Mallon is the author of "A Book of One's Own," a study of diaries. His novel, "Dewey Defeats Truman" (Pantheon), was recently published
In all the accounts of those grotesque baby beauty pageants inflicted on JonBenet Ramsey, I have yet to see any suggestion that the abuse of this child began the moment she was named. "JonBenet," with its ridiculous central capital, was cobbled together from the first and middle names (John Bennett) of her father. At that instant, it seems to me, this little girl became the ego trip of her parents, fit for parading instead of for living anything close to an actual childhood.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER and No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. and --Eleanor Roosevelt
Wrong, Eleanor. A quick chat with Justin Kaplan could send even the smuggest semanticist into what Matthew Arnold called "an iron time of doubt." This man has read everything and everyone. Kaplan, editor of the 16th Edition of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, has spent two years poring over virtually every quotable quote ever written, spoken or sung--with the power to decide what goes in and what stays out of the classic reference book. From Ptahhotpe in 24th Century B.C.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | JACK SMITH
I have a letter from Charlton Heston deploring the fact that the 16th edition of Bartlett's "Familiar Quotations," published in 1992, contains only three quotations from Ronald Reagan, and opining that those were selected to make him look bad. Heston further alleges that the editor of that edition, Justin Kaplan, was guilty of "Draconian censorship" in excluding from Bartlett's "most of the conservative comment" of the last generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2004 | Nicholas A. Basbanes, Special to The Times
Living With a Writer Edited by Dale Salwak Palgrave Macmillan: 238 pp., $24.95 * A few years ago I had occasion to interview biographer Michael Holroyd and his wife, novelist Margaret Drabble, while each was crisscrossing the country, both promoting new books. For reasons known only to their respective publishers, they traveled separately to the same cities, so while Holroyd was talking to me in Boston, Drabble might be in Los Angeles.
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