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Justin Kell

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BUSINESS
April 27, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
Moviegoers and movie critics have come away from "Oblivion" raving about the vavoom vehicles in the box-office hit starring Tom Cruise -- especially lead character Jack's futuristic folding motocross bike. Known on the set as "Jack's moto bike," the wispy ghost-white bike wheelies its way across a landscape of desert salt flats -- actually, volcanic sand in Iceland -- and transports the hero into and out of trouble throughout director Joseph Kosinski's dystopian film. The "moto bike," though, was a Honda CRF450X before local motorcycle-fabricator-to-the-stars Justin Kell started transforming it. Kell, whose Glory Motor Works has built or restored bikes for "The Master," "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" and "G.I.
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BUSINESS
April 27, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
Moviegoers and movie critics have come away from "Oblivion" raving about the vavoom vehicles in the box-office hit starring Tom Cruise -- especially lead character Jack's futuristic folding motocross bike. Known on the set as "Jack's moto bike," the wispy ghost-white bike wheelies its way across a landscape of desert salt flats -- actually, volcanic sand in Iceland -- and transports the hero into and out of trouble throughout director Joseph Kosinski's dystopian film. The "moto bike," though, was a Honda CRF450X before local motorcycle-fabricator-to-the-stars Justin Kell started transforming it. Kell, whose Glory Motor Works has built or restored bikes for "The Master," "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" and "G.I.
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NEWS
July 3, 2003 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to motorcycling, each type of riding has its unique style. Motocrossers gear up in multicolored jerseys. Sport bikers don one-piece racing suits. Harley riders favor chaps and fringe. For the most part, the clothing is new and easy to find. But when it comes to vintage motorcycling, riders are at the mercy of what has survived decades of wind, rain and occasional brushes with pavement. The result: slim pickings.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2012 | By Cristy Lytal
Working in Hollywood has a lot in common with riding motorcycles: high stakes and a fast pace. That's why Justin Kell, owner of Glory Motor Works, loves providing and building motorcycles for films such as the upcoming "Gangster Squad," "G.I. Joe: Retaliation" and "Oblivion. " "You have a bad day on a bike, you could be dead; you have a bad day on set, you have a dead career," he said. "But all the stuff that makes these jobs really hard to do, I like. I like having to think 500 steps ahead of what could happen and be prepared for it. I love the energy of these jobs, the push and the deadlines.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2012 | By Cristy Lytal
Working in Hollywood has a lot in common with riding motorcycles: high stakes and a fast pace. That's why Justin Kell, owner of Glory Motor Works, loves providing and building motorcycles for films such as the upcoming "Gangster Squad," "G.I. Joe: Retaliation" and "Oblivion. " "You have a bad day on a bike, you could be dead; you have a bad day on set, you have a dead career," he said. "But all the stuff that makes these jobs really hard to do, I like. I like having to think 500 steps ahead of what could happen and be prepared for it. I love the energy of these jobs, the push and the deadlines.
NEWS
January 6, 2000 | SUSAN CARPENTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dogs along Silver Lake Boulevard still drag their owners toward Penny Lane. The vintage home furnishings store, newly opened in a space formerly occupied by a pet supply shop, has been visited more often by confused dogs than paying customers at this point. The shop, which opened this week, still smells of fresh paint--colored celery green to compliment the blond wood, Heywood-Wakefield furnishings on sale.
NEWS
July 3, 2003 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
When it comes to motorcycling, each type of riding has its unique style. Motocrossers gear up in multicolored jerseys. Sport bikers don one-piece racing suits. Harley riders favor chaps and fringe. For the most part, the clothing is new and easy to find. But when it comes to vintage motorcycling, riders are at the mercy of what has survived decades of wind, rain and occasional brushes with pavement. The result: slim pickings.
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