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Justin Tanner

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1994
Eight plays by Justin Tanner are going up at the Cast Theatre in the next two weeks--seven revivals and the brand-new "The Tent Show," under the umbrella title "The Collected Plays of Justin Tanner." Here are descriptions and schedules: Still Life With Vacuum Salesman (formerly "Barbie and Ken at Home") (1989). Former high school royalty choose an unfortunate salesman as their method of returning to the top.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Laurie Winer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The director David Schweizer is rehearsing the large cast of "Procreation," Justin Tanner's new play about, guess what, a hilariously dysfunctional, lower-middle-class clan in a nondescript suburb of Los Angeles. This milieu has been Tanner's rich playground for as long as he's been writing — two decades now. Schweizer, a slim, silver-haired man with large, soulful eyes and a mellifluous voice, wants the actors to re-play a scene, going back to "the outburst." "Which outburst?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Laurie Winer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The director David Schweizer is rehearsing the large cast of "Procreation," Justin Tanner's new play about, guess what, a hilariously dysfunctional, lower-middle-class clan in a nondescript suburb of Los Angeles. This milieu has been Tanner's rich playground for as long as he's been writing — two decades now. Schweizer, a slim, silver-haired man with large, soulful eyes and a mellifluous voice, wants the actors to re-play a scene, going back to "the outburst." "Which outburst?"
NEWS
August 11, 2005 | Don Shirley
The Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization is asking Justin Tanner to remove any elements from his play "Oklahomo!," now running in Burbank, that are derived from the musical "Oklahoma!" Tanner contends that the only two parts of the play that quote from "Oklahoma!" -- with altered lyrics -- are so brief that he hopes the organization's viewpoint will change after it receives a script that Tanner says is being sent. Bert Fink, a spokesman for Rodgers & Hammerstein, said the "Oklahomo!"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1994 | Laurie Winer, Laurie Winer is The Times' theater critic
What if Arthur Miller felt there was nothing shameful about being in the lower middle class and he had a sense of humor? And he was 30? Would he be Justin Tanner? No, better let a young writer more concerned with morals, like Jon Robin Baitz, inherit the heavy mantle of the American Playwright.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1999 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today, the stage at Hollywood's Cast Theatre looks like a landfill, with what appears to be the year's trash quota for Greater Los Angeles strewn across the floor. Crumpled paper, foam coffee cups, old high school trophies. An extra-large plastic soda bottle, not quite empty, serves as the leg for a coffee table.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Yippee yai kai yai yay! Justin Tanner, gadfly playwright known for such campy comedies as "Pot Mom" and "Intervention," takes a wild gallop over the top in "Oklahomo!" -- the first production by the newly formed Third Stage Company at Third Stage in Burbank. Tanner's cheerfully offensive romp about marginal West Hollywood theater types putting on an unauthorized gay adaptation of "Oklahoma!" will likely leave you hooting at the sheer preposterousness of it all. A caveat.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2005 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Playwright Justin Tanner, whose work was a favorite of L.A.'s theater audiences during the '90s, is formally regrouping his troupe of actors as the Third Stage Company, which will produce a five-play season at Burbank's 50-seat Third Stage. "Michael Ritchie threw down the gauntlet," Tanner says, referring to the new Center Theatre Group artistic director's vow to create collaborations with smaller theater companies to help develop new plays. "That lit a fire under me.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
When "The Collected Plays of Justin Tanner" opened in 1994 at the Cast Theatre in Hollywood, it should have been a heady time for Tanner. Though he was only 30, he was clearly the L.A. playwright of the moment. Seven of his earlier, widely acclaimed and long-running comedies were being revived, and the Tannerfest culminated with the premiere of his new play, "The Tent Show." But Tanner didn't have much time to bask in the glory. He was the director of all eight productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1998 | Diane Haithman, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
There's this new drug everybody's talking about--you know the one. If you've forgotten the name of it, take a look at every other headline in the paper. It's for men. It's blue. It's a comedian's dream. According to medical reports, it's the best thing to happen to the sexually challenged American male since the little red Corvette. But it takes no prescription, in fact, no pill at all, to change your ordinary, run-of-the-mill female into a Coyote Woman.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Yippee yai kai yai yay! Justin Tanner, gadfly playwright known for such campy comedies as "Pot Mom" and "Intervention," takes a wild gallop over the top in "Oklahomo!" -- the first production by the newly formed Third Stage Company at Third Stage in Burbank. Tanner's cheerfully offensive romp about marginal West Hollywood theater types putting on an unauthorized gay adaptation of "Oklahoma!" will likely leave you hooting at the sheer preposterousness of it all. A caveat.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2005 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Playwright Justin Tanner, whose work was a favorite of L.A.'s theater audiences during the '90s, is formally regrouping his troupe of actors as the Third Stage Company, which will produce a five-play season at Burbank's 50-seat Third Stage. "Michael Ritchie threw down the gauntlet," Tanner says, referring to the new Center Theatre Group artistic director's vow to create collaborations with smaller theater companies to help develop new plays. "That lit a fire under me.
NEWS
December 5, 2002 | David C. Nichols
Hot Property: Writer-director Justin Tanner's first Los Angeles premiere in four years is generally hilarious and representative of its author's distinctive voice. Like many Tanner works, "Property" transpires in present-day Los Angeles at the Beachwood Canyon apartment of protagonist Brett (Matt Huhn). The premise pits veteran 99-seat theater actor Brett against drugs, colleagues, the heartless Industry and, above all, his visiting family, yet another dysfunctional Tanner brood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
When "The Collected Plays of Justin Tanner" opened in 1994 at the Cast Theatre in Hollywood, it should have been a heady time for Tanner. Though he was only 30, he was clearly the L.A. playwright of the moment. Seven of his earlier, widely acclaimed and long-running comedies were being revived, and the Tannerfest culminated with the premiere of his new play, "The Tent Show." But Tanner didn't have much time to bask in the glory. He was the director of all eight productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
A big question mark hangs over the future of the Cast Theatre. For the last decade, the little two-space complex in Hollywood has housed the works of Justin Tanner, L.A.'s best-known home-grown playwright-director. Last April, Tanner and his longtime collaborator, Andy Daley, jointly split from their mutual producer and mentor, Diana Gibson, taking control of the theater with them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Justin Tanner, playwright laureate for L.A.'s young and unsettled singles, finally allowed someone other than himself--Lisa James--to stage one of his plays, using a number of actors who are new to his work rather than his standard repertory company. The vehicle is "Bitter Women," his 1993 hit about the inhabitants of a Silver Lake apartment building. The production is in the familiar environs of Tanner's home base at the Cast Theatre, but who are all those new faces up there?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1996 | Janice Arkatov, Janice Arkatov is a regular contributor to Calendar
It's a medical fact: Laurel Green and Justin Tanner are not joined at the hip. True, the actress has appeared in every one of Tanner's 12 plays--and many times he's created and shaded the roles specifically for her. And yes, they bonded as freshmen at L.A. City College, car-pooling to school together and later living in the same apartment building. Rarely a day goes by when they don't see each other or talk on the phone. It's never been romantic--just a fierce friendship.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1994 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer
If you call the Cast Theatre in Hollywood, the man who answers the phone may very well be the same guy who writes the plays. And directs them. Besides being a remarkably prolific playwright-director, Justin Tanner works part-time in the box office for the Cast--which consists of two small theaters, one seating 99, the other 65. He does the spreadsheets on the receipts from his own shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999
Reading that the Cast Theatre might be returning to its roots (Theater Notes, May 23) brought me much joy. I was a friend of Ted Schmitt and was lucky enough to have worked with him on David Mamet's "Sexual Perversity in Chicago" in 1980. Without his generosity of spirit and risk-taking elan, the show would never have been possible. Ted nurtured the entire production team as no other producer I've ever known. To him, we were all the Cast. We don't have many legacies in Los Angeles, and the theater community has even fewer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
In the '80s, Ted Schmitt turned Hollywood's Cast Theatres into two of L.A.'s most creative stages. When he died in May 1990, he was replaced by his longtime associate Diana Gibson, who converted the small theater complex into a virtually exclusive showcase for playwright Justin Tanner and his repertory company. Tanner became L.A.'s most popular home-grown playwright of the '90s, and he frequently gave Gibson much of the credit. Yet as the '90s end, Gibson is gone.
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