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Justine Frischmann

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2000 | MARC WEINGARTEN
Justine Frischmann doesn't brook excess--neither the emotional nor musical kind--too well. For her band Elastica's engagement at the Roxy on Thursday, the gruffly sensual singer punched out terse spoken introductions to songs that left no room for ambiguity. When the band launched into a number, it did so with swift dispatch, then got out just as efficiently.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2000 | MARC WEINGARTEN
Justine Frischmann doesn't brook excess--neither the emotional nor musical kind--too well. For her band Elastica's engagement at the Roxy on Thursday, the gruffly sensual singer punched out terse spoken introductions to songs that left no room for ambiguity. When the band launched into a number, it did so with swift dispatch, then got out just as efficiently.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1997 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
Along with Oasis, Elastica was the high-profile British rock invader of 1995, a coed band that combined the seductiveness of the Pretenders with the perky energy of Wire and other choice groups from rock's early-'80s new-wave movement. Singer-songwriter Justine Frischmann and bandmates not only gave us one of the most acclaimed albums of that year in "Elastica" but were also profiled by every publication with even a trace of pop consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1997 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
Along with Oasis, Elastica was the high-profile British rock invader of 1995, a coed band that combined the seductiveness of the Pretenders with the perky energy of Wire and other choice groups from rock's early-'80s new-wave movement. Singer-songwriter Justine Frischmann and bandmates not only gave us one of the most acclaimed albums of that year in "Elastica" but were also profiled by every publication with even a trace of pop consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2000 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Taking five years to follow a promising, bracing debut, this English band offers just 39 minutes of music--35 without the pointless version of Trio's novelty "Da Da Da." Sadly, the rest of "The Menace" (in stores Tuesday) is merely frothy punk/new wave exercises evoking X-Ray Specs here, B-52's there and adding up to pretty much nothing. Justine Frischmann projects some barbed attitude ("Your Arse My Place"), but only on the moody "My Sex" does she dig inside herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM
If the peppy cheerleader type catches your fancy, you'll probably be just mad about Saffron. The smiling, bouncy frontwoman of the new English dance-rock band Republica wasn't mellow yellow or any other shade of laid-back on Wednesday, turning the stage of the Galaxy Theatre in Santa Ana into her own combination gymnasium and go-go platform. In a monolithic but fetching performance, Saffron hopped, leaped, shuffled, spun, shadowboxed and punched the sky like a pep-squad leader sans pompons.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1995 | Steve Hochman
ELASTICA, "Elastica" ( DGC/Geffen ) *** 1/2 Any Tom, Dick or Billy Joe can re-create the sound of early-'80s power punk. Reviving the spirit is another matter entirely, and the 16 brash bursts on this young English quartet's debut album have that spirit in spades. Sure, we've heard it all before: The angular rhythms come straight from old Wire and Fall records, and Justine Frischmann's pointed barbs and no-nonsense delivery are right out of vintage Chrissie Hynde and X-Ray Spex.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1995 | ROBERT HILBURN
Sleeper is no Elastica, and Louise Wener is no Justine Frischmann. Though the two British rock quartets and their lead singers are frequently linked back home because both deal in invigorating power-punk textures and somewhat sassy lyrics, Sleeper's performance on Saturday at the Whisky fell far short of Elastica's recent triumph in the same club.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1995 | Robert Hilburn
Some of them you know. Some you don't. But the following artists, entertainers and executives have one thing in common: We're counting on each to mae a significant impact or difference in their respective fields this year. Sure, there will be thers who make a splash, but after we talked with dozens of people who work in entertainment and the arts, these were the names mentioned most often. You might say that Jim Carrey was a face to watch in '94, and you would be right.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1995 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
The last thing Elastica needed as the quartet walked on stage for its L.A. debut on Tuesday at the Whisky was for KROQ-FM emcee Rodney Bingenheimer to proclaim from the stage that the capacity crowd was about to see "history in the making." This English band was so widely acclaimed months before its first album hit the streets this week that even the mildest cynics surely suspected that a heavy dose of hype was heading their way.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1999 | ROBERT HILBURN
Record industry insiders were wrong in their predictions that electronica was going to be the next big commercial thing in pop, but that's no reason not to check out some enticing new works that touch to varying degrees on the British dance-scene movement, including collections by Badmarsh+Shri, Prodigy's Liam Howlett and Underworld. All three are in this guide to how to keep up with what's exciting in pop on an album budget of $50 a month.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1995 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
By commercial standards, it was strictly no contest in 1995 between Alanis Morissette and Ani DiFranco. DiFranco's album "Not a Pretty Girl" has only sold about 50,000 copies on her own, tiny Righteous Babe label. Thanks to the hit single "You Oughta Know," Morissette's "Jagged Little Pill" album has sold more than 3 million copies for Madonna's high-powered Maverick label.
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