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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1998 | DADE HAYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the rugged High Desert of the Antelope Valley, it always has been easy to feel isolated from the rest of Los Angeles County, scores of miles and rock formations to the south. Just ask a juvenile offender. Historically, minors caught breaking the law there had to make a 60-mile trip to Sylmar to appear in one of the county's 27 full-time juvenile courts. Sometimes they got sent even farther, to East Los Angeles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2013 | By Emily Foxhall
The older brother of an autistic Menifee boy who went missing will be formally charged with his brother's murder Monday, Riverside County prosecutors said. The 16-year-old brother of Terry Smith Jr., 11, was arrested after his brother's remains were found in a shallow grave near the family's home. The brother is due in juvenile court for a detention hearing Monday. Prosecutors will ask a judge to consider charging the brother as an adult at a future court date, prosecutors said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two weeks after fire destroyed his home in the Crest de Ville section of Orange, John O'Neill finds himself scanning the papers and tuning in his radio for any word about the 17-year-old suspected of starting the blaze that also gutted a neighbor's home and damaged 29 others. "I keep waiting to hear something, but so far, no news," said O'Neill, a businessman who is moving with his wife and three sons into a rental home this weekend.
OPINION
June 23, 2013 | Jim Newton
Over the years, Judge Michael Nash, who supervises the Los Angeles Juvenile Court, has been tough and persistent. Bucking a long-standing tradition of secrecy, he opened courtrooms in Dependency Court, where the futures of young people in foster care are decided, and he waited out the uproar that ensued without wavering. He regularly confronts some of society's most dispiriting failures and yet he's remained a tireless - and generally upbeat - advocate for children. Last week, though, I found him in an uncharacteristically glum mood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his cramped and cluttered office in a temporary trailer here, Juvenile Court Presiding Judge Francisco P. Briseno has witnessed the changing face of crime in recent years among young people in Orange County. "Every morning I get lists of who's taken into custody," he said, "and every morning I'm amazed at the number of serious felonies committed by minors, the numbers carrying guns, and the number of kids in gangs."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992 | ROSE KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As she stood triumphantly at the new juvenile courthouse named in her honor, retired Judge Betty Lou Lamoreaux on Wednesday recalled the skepticism she encountered in 1984 when she told her fellow judges that she would get a new courthouse built. "Needless to say, my heart is full.
NEWS
July 25, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Crime's pressure is mounting for office workers and juveniles, according to two studies released by the Justice Department on Sunday. A study by the department's Bureau of Justice Statistics, found that one of every six violent crimes occurs at work, affecting nearly 1 million victims nationwide each year. It said 16% of all assaults, 8% of all rapes and 7% of all robberies take place at work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2002 | STUART PFEIFER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's standing room only most mornings in the third-floor hallways of the juvenile courthouse in Orange. Young couples, some entire families, fill benches and line the walls, looking as though they are waiting for the courtrooms to open. But behind twin wooden doors, judges are conducting serious business, deciding what to do with children who have allegedly been neglected or abused by their parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993 | RENE LYNCH and MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The 17-year-old arrested in connection with the $1-million Anaheim Hills blaze that gutted two homes and damaged 29 others has been charged with recklessly setting a fire, but not with arson, a juvenile court official said Monday. Orange County Juvenile Court Referee James Odriozola said the case will remain confidential, along with the juvenile's name, in keeping with juvenile court guidelines designed to protect youthful offenders from public exposure. Since his Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Joyce A. Karlin, who has been at the center of a storm of protest since her controversial decision to give a Korean-born grocer probation in the killing of a black girl, has been transferred from the Compton courthouse to a new assignment with the Juvenile Court. The reassignment was announced Friday afternoon by Superior Court Presiding Judge Ricardo A. Torres, who just two months ago refused to move Karlin off the criminal bench.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts
Marcus Bell knows how important Los Angeles County courts are for at-risk youth. Bell, a gang intervention and prevention worker in South Los Angeles, has worked hard with young people, trying to get them to not run from police. He's worked with them to get into the courts when they have legal issues, to deal with them responsibly instead of not showing up and having warrants issued at a young age. On Saturday, Bell said he worries about the Los Angeles County Superior Court's cost-cutting plan that includes the closure of the Kenyon Juvenile Justice Center.
OPINION
February 12, 2012
Judge Michael Nash, who presides over the Los Angeles County Juvenile Court, has long argued that public access to the court's proceedings would improve its accountability and the accountability of those who appear before it. Last week, he set out to prove it. Nash, along with this page, had supported state legislation that would change the presumption that dependency court hearings, in which the fate of children in foster care is decided, should...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2012 | By Garrett Therolf and John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
Just days into an unprecedented effort to open Los Angeles County children's courts to the press, Judge D. Zeke Zeidler weighed the case of a young boy whose abuse injuries raised concerns that he might never be able to run again and have confined him to a medical facility for many months. In a hearing Tuesday at Edelman Children's Court in Monterey Park — the sort of proceeding almost never viewed by the media or outsiders prior to an order handed down last week — the boy's lawyer reported that since being taken from his parents, the youngster has made remarkable progress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2012 | By Garrett Therolf, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Juvenile Court will be opened to press coverage regularly, with certain exceptions intended to protect the interests of children, under an order issued Tuesday by the court's presiding judge. FOR THE RECORD: Juvenile Court: In the LATExtra sections of Feb. 1 and Feb. 8, articles about a decision to open Los Angeles County children's courts to reporters erred in some instances in headlines and in text by referring to access by media. The order by Judge Michael Nash specified that those courtrooms be open to the press.
OPINION
November 28, 2011 | By Marcy Valenzuela
Juvenile dependency courts exist to protect children and youths who have been neglected and abused, so it's shocking that the presiding judge who oversees the Los Angeles County Superior Court's juvenile division is pushing a plan that puts foster children and youths at risk of further harm. If Judge Michael Nash's order stands, vulnerable children, youths and their families, who are already dealing with painful consequences of neglect and abuse, would face the additional burden of proving why the most intimate details of their lives should be kept private.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2011 | By Garrett Therolf, Los Angeles Times
Dozens of foster children and attorneys protested Monday outside Los Angeles County's Edelman Children's Court in opposition to the proposed opening of juvenile dependency hearings to the public. Currently, members of the media and public are barred from entering dependency courtrooms without court permission. But Judge Michael Nash proposed a blanket order this month that would make the hearings open unless someone objects and a judge decides to close the proceeding. Lucias Bouge, a 19-year-old former foster youth opposed to Nash's proposal, said: "Kids laughed at me because of the way I talked, because my family was poor and because I was different from everybody else.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2012 | By Garrett Therolf and John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
Just days into an unprecedented effort to open Los Angeles County children's courts to the press, Judge D. Zeke Zeidler weighed the case of a young boy whose abuse injuries raised concerns that he might never be able to run again and have confined him to a medical facility for many months. In a hearing Tuesday at Edelman Children's Court in Monterey Park — the sort of proceeding almost never viewed by the media or outsiders prior to an order handed down last week — the boy's lawyer reported that since being taken from his parents, the youngster has made remarkable progress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1998 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT
People interested in learning how a case moves through the courts and who the players are in the local justice system can attend a question-and-answer forum May 20 in Ventura. The forum will be from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Ventura City Council chambers, 501 Poli St. It will be broadcast live by cable companies throughout the county. People who cannot attend may submit questions by calling 654-7830.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2011 | By Garrett Therolf, Los Angeles Times
The presiding judge of Los Angeles County's Juvenile Court is preparing to open child dependency proceedings to the public in an effort to improve accountability and transparency in child abuse, neglect and foster care placement cases. Currently, members of the media and the public are barred from entering dependency courtrooms without court permission. But Judge Michael Nash is proposing a blanket order that would make the hearings open unless someone objects and a judge decides to close the proceeding.
WORLD
October 1, 2011 | By Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times
When Suad Dabbagh and two other women graduated from Iraq's Judicial Institute in 1979, they became the first female judges in a nation run by Saddam Hussein. The novelty led to a deluge of news photo and interview requests. But progress was short-lived. By the mid-1980s, when Hussein's government once again stopped accepting women in its judicial study program, there were only six female judges. These days, after eight wrenching years of invasion, occupation and rebuilding, the outlook is different: There are 72 female judges working in Iraqi courts.
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