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Juvenile Crime

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1998
In his latest phony public relations move, our governor wants to create a confrontation with Democrats over his proposals to address juvenile crime (Feb. 4). One question: Where was Gov. Crimefighter a few months ago, when Democrats in the Legislature voted to ban the sale of the junk guns that are favored by juvenile criminals? Given the chance to address youth violence and save lives, Gov. Pete Wilson ignored the will of the majority of Californians and the legislative support of every major law enforcement organization.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein
Yet another cinematic slice of suburban dysfunction, "The Family Tree" works better as a serious look at a family's second chance at happiness than when it pushes its darkly comic agenda about an Ohio community's various peccadilloes. Director Vivi Friedman's inability to successfully reconcile the film's duality undercuts an eclectic cast gamely committed to Mark Lisson's thematically ambitious, if scattered, script. An ill-gotten clonk on the head gives bitter, two-timing wife Bunnie Burnett (Hope Davis)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1997 | DADE HAYES
State lawmakers will meet with students and residents Monday to discuss the issue of juvenile crime at a joint hearing of the Assembly's Public Safety and Human Services committees at Birmingham High School. The event is one of six such hearings around the state, and two in Los Angeles. Assemblyman Robert Hertzberg (D-Sherman Oaks) arranged to hold the all-day hearing at Birmingham in an effort to connect with those affected directly by juvenile crime.
NEWS
December 2, 2007 | Sharon Cohen, Associated Press
A generation after America decided to get tough on kids who commit crimes -- sometimes locking them up for life -- the tide may be turning. States are rethinking and, in some cases, retooling juvenile sentencing laws. They're responding to new research on the adolescent brain, and studies indicating that teens sent to adult court end up worse off than those who aren't: They get in trouble more often, they do it faster and the offenses are more serious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1996
Re "Florida's Tough Teen Crime Stance May Be Wrong Cure," July 11: Florida's new "tougher sentences" are a joke. To send three teens to jail for three years for attempting to murder someone is offensive and ludicrous. I've been an emergency physician for 12 years, and have seen scores of such miscreants coursing through my departments. It is always an experience. Their values are truly alien to the majority of hard-working people living in this country. For most, shooting someone produces about the same emotional response as walking across the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1996
One fact we can all agree on is that juvenile crime is the fastest-rising element of crime in America. Another is that once on the road to crime it is difficult to take another road. We also know that, in the last two years, juvenile crime has dropped by more than 30% in Dallas. The Dallas City Council did not hire more police nor spend more money on high-tech equipment. They did stop thousands of people from becoming victims, they did cut the number of victims taken to hospital emergency rooms at hospitals, they did stop the need to build more jails and prisons, they did stop the trauma of crime on thousands of families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1997
As one of the Orange County organizations alluded to in your Dec. 26 editorial, "Getting Tough Isn't the Only Answer to Juvenile Crime," the Orange County Bar Foundation strongly supports your view that programs targeting juvenile crime prevention should be adopted statewide and should be assured a reliable source of funds. The foundation's nationally acclaimed Shortstop Program, its Hispanic counterpart Programa Shortstop, and our Peer Court and gang violence suppression programs focus on early intervention so that juveniles at risk or who have committed a first violation receive education, counseling and encouragement to get back on track.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1994 | RON HARRIS
It didn't take me long to realize that I'd been had. A bunch of faded faces peeking out of drab suits had fooled me with the oldest trick in the book, the bait and switch. I had been invited to speak before a state legislative committee on the subject of juvenile justice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2004 | Jenifer Warren, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger vetoed a bill Tuesday that sought to help judges decide which juvenile crimes were serious enough to merit prosecution in adult court. In a statement, Schwarzenegger said the bill would "seriously compromise public safety" by preventing some of California's most dangerous juvenile offenders from being tried as adults. He also suggested that the measure would erode a ballot initiative, approved by voters in 2000, that sought to toughen penalties for young criminals.
OPINION
July 6, 2004
After reading two recent articles regarding juvenile justice in The Times, I have one question: Could someone please tell U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) about Missouri ("Spare the Rod, Save the Child," July 1)? It is clear to me after reading the June 25 article regarding [co-sponsor] Feinstein's federal Gang Prevention and Effective Deterrence Act that what she proposes is more of the same regarding how we deal with juvenile offenders, and that is the problem. What we currently do doesn't work.
OPINION
November 3, 2002
For too long, the needs of California's children have been ignored as special interests have derailed repeated attempts to provide proven after-school programs for California's children. Public safety professionals witness the consequences of the lack of after-school programs. Juvenile crime -- homicide, rape, robbery and assault -- surges between the hours of 3 and 6 p.m. This is when children are most likely to abuse alcohol, tobacco or drugs or have sex. In most instances, kids are also the victims of juvenile crime.
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | MAURA DOLAN and GREG KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The California Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the constitutionality of a ballot measure that allows for stringent penalties against teenagers who commit crimes and gives prosecutors unilateral authority to decide whether certain teens should be tried as adults. In its sweeping ruling, the state high court rejected multi-pronged attacks on Proposition 21, the juvenile justice measure overwhelming passed by voters in March 2000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2001 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's effort to prevent its young from becoming criminals or crime victims is haphazard and underfunded and often fails to help those most in need, a state oversight panel concludes in a report released Tuesday. Despite a steady decline in juvenile crime, the report calls youth violence a crisis and says prevention programs must no longer be viewed as a luxury by lawmakers and taxpayers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2001 | JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Board of Corrections has signed off on a $10-million grant for nearly a dozen Orange County programs aimed at curbing juvenile crime, the governor's office announced Thursday. The grant will help fund 11 local initiatives, including a new team of investigators that will gather intelligence on problem high school students in areas patrolled by the Sheriff's Department.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2000 | Howard Rosenberg
Thank goodness for the U.S. Supreme Court. George W. Bush was elected just in time to shake loose aspiring talk-show host Bill Clinton's Hollywood pals from positions of influence and pluck the U.S. Justice Department from the diamond-studded hip pocket of the entertainment industry. Right? The Clinton Justice Department must be doing the entertainment industry's bidding. Right?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2000 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ventura County judge refused Tuesday to send a murder case involving a 17-year-old Oxnard boy to Juvenile Court, ruling that prosecutors have the legal discretion to charge the teen as an adult. Superior Court Judge Glen Reiser's decision is the first in this county to tackle the constitutionality of a tough new juvenile crime law being challenged in courts throughout the state.
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